Bulletin of the United States Geological and Geographical Survey of the Territories, 4. köide

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Page 314 - Istly, that the several regions are not of equal rank ; — :2ndly, that they are not equally applicable to all classes of animals. As to the first objection, it will be found impossible to form any three or more regions, each of which differs from the rest in an equal degree or in the same manner. One...
Page 443 - They consist of the greater part of a skeleton, embracing all of the bones of the anterior and posterior extremities, excepting the femora. Unfortunately, the bill and the anterior portion of the head are wanting, but the outlines of the remainder of the head and of the neck are distinctly traceable. The bones are all in situ, and indicate beyond question a high ornithic type, probably referable to the Oscine division of the Passeres. The specimen bears also remarkably distinct impressions of the...
Page 316 - If these considerations are well founded," he continues, " the objections of those who study insects or molluscs, — for example, that our regions are not true for their departments of nature, — cannot be maintained. For they will find, that a careful consideration of the exceptional means of dispersal and conditions of existence of each group, will explain most of the divergences from the normal distribution of higher animals.
Page 325 - ... part of its natural history. We require also to know its exact range at the present day and in prehistoric times, and to have some knowledge of its geological age, the place of its earliest appearance on the globe, and of the various extinct forms most nearly allied to it. To those who accept the theory of development as worked out by Mr. Darwin, and the views as to the general permanence and immense antiquity of the great continents and oceans so ably developed by. Sir Charles Lyell, it ceases...
Page 700 - The head is shining chestnut brown with black mandibles. The body is livid or blackish green, naked, with series of black dots, each dot giving rise to a single, rather stout, bristle, The prothoracic shield is blackish. The larva has three pair of thoracic or true jointed feet, and four abdominal or false feet, besides anal claspers. This larva, eating on the inner side of the bark, and making furrows in the wood, causes the bleeding which, when the depletion is excessive or continuous, and especially...
Page 266 - The snake prepares for action by throwing itself into a number of superimposed coils, upon the mass of which the neck and a few inches more lie loosely curved, the head elevated, the tail projecting and rapidly vibrating. At the approach of the intended victim, the serpent, by sudden contraction of the muscles upon the convexity of the curves, straightens out the anterior portion of the body, and thus darts forward the head. At this instant, the jaws are widely separated, and the back of the head...
Page 333 - ... this in a subdivision of the earth which is established for the very purpose of expressing such contrasts more clearly and concisely than by ordinary geographical terminology, would be both illogical and inconvenient. The one question then remains, whether the Nearctic region should be kept separate, or whether it should form part of the Palaearctic or of the Neotropical regions.
Page 777 - Report on the Collection of Fishes Made by Dr. Elliott Coues, USA , in Dakota and Montana, During the Seasons of 1873 and 1874.
Page 315 - One will surpass all others in the possession of peculiar families; another will have many characteristic genera; while a third will be mainly distinguished by negative characters. There will also be found many intermediate districts, which possess some of the characteristics of two well-marked regions...
Page 497 - ... be entirely destroyed. After they have passed, nothing remains but the large branches and the roots, which being under ground have escaped their voracity." And in a late work of travels in the same country we find the following passage : — " During our ride (from Cordova to Seville) we observed a number of men advancing in skirmishing order across the country, and thrashing the ground most savagely with long flails. Curious to know what could be the motives for this Xerxes-like treatment of...

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