The Sacred Foundations of Justice in Islam: The Teachings of ʻAlî Ibn Abî Ṭâlib

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World Wisdom, Inc, 2006 - 176 pages
Through the wisdom of his teachings, their profound metaphysical insights and practical guidance, and the exemplary life that he led, 'Ali ibn Abi Talib (599-661) is regarded as a paragon of wisdom, piety and virtue and is not only a great Muslim but a great religious leader whose universal message of truth is relevant for all time. The son in law of the prophet Mohammed, he is revered by both Sunni and Shi'a Muslims, for whom he is the first Imam and the Prophet's spiritual successor. He was assassinated in 661. The Sacred Foundations of Justice in Islam is an anthology of essays on the teachings of the first Shia Imam (the fourth Caliph of Sunni Islam and one of the forefathers of Sufism) dealing with the metaphysical foundations of human governance.

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Contents

Imam Ali Truth and Justice
3
Imam Alis Letter to Malik alAshtar
61
Ali ibn Abi Talibs Ethics of Mercy in the Mirror of the Persian Sufi Tradition
109
Note on Ali ibn Abi Talib c600661 CE
147
Notes on Contributors
151
Index of Arabic Terms
153
Index of Quranic References
155
Index of Proper Names
157
General Index
159
Sources Referred to in the Text
165
Copyright

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Page 130 - The only point where human bliss stands still, And tastes the good without the fall to ill ; Where only merit constant pay receives, Is...
Page 24 - And when the woman saw that the tree was good for food, and that it was pleasant to the eyes, and a tree to be desired to make one wise, she took of the fruit thereof, and did eat, and gave also unto her husband with her; and he did eat. And the eyes of them both were opened, and they knew that they were naked; and they sewed fig leaves together, and made themselves aprons.
Page 135 - He who the sword of heaven will bear Should be as holy as severe ; Pattern in himself, to know, Grace to stand, and virtue go ; More nor less to others paying, Than by self-offences weighing. Shame to him, whose cruel striking Kills for faults of his own liking...
Page 56 - Truth is within ourselves ; it takes no rise From outward things, whate'er you may believe. There is an inmost centre in us all, Where truth abides in fulness ; and around, Wall upon wall, the gross flesh hems it in, This perfect, clear perception— which is truth. A baffling and perverting carnal mesh Binds it, and makes all error : and to KNOW Rather consists in opening out a way Whence the imprisoned splendour may escape, Than in effecting entry for a light Supposed to be without.
Page 23 - And the Lord God planted a garden eastward, in Eden; and there he put the man whom he had formed. And out of the ground made the Lord God to grow every tree that is pleasant to the sight, and good for food; the tree of life also in the midst of the garden, and the tree of the knowledge of good and evil.
Page 122 - Teach me to feel another's woe, To hide the fault I see; That mercy I to others show, That mercy show to me.
Page 6 - Verily, we offered the trust to the heavens and the earth and the mountains, but they refused to bear it, and shrank from it; but man bore it: verily, he is ever unjust and ignorant.
Page 38 - Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind. This is the first and great commandment. And the second is like unto it, Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself. On these two commandments hang all the law and the prophets.

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