Strictures on the Lives and Characters of the Most Eminent Lawyers of the Present Day: Including, Among Other Celebrated Names, Those of the Lord Chancellor, and the Twelve Judges

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G. Kearsley, 1790 - 232 pages
 

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Page 39 - His * references to expreflions which fell from him in the courfe of a debate, and his quotations from books, were fo faithful, that they might have been faid to have been repeated -verbatim. The purpofes to which he employed thefe amazing talents, were ftill more extraordinary : if it was the weak part of his opponent's arguments that he referred to, he was fure to expofe its fallacy, weaknefs, or abfurdity in the moft poignant fatire, or hold it up in the moft ridiculous point of view. If, on the...
Page 48 - Besides what is irreparable my pecuniary loss is great. I apprehended no danger, and therefore took no precaution. But, how great soever that loss may be, I think it does not become me to claim or expect reparation from the state. I have made up my mind to my misfortune, as I ought ; with this consolation, that it came from those whose object manifestly was general confusion and destruction at home, in addition to a dangerous and complicated war abroad.
Page 41 - ... due effect to, the laws,' — I have hitherto done it without any other gift or reward than that most pleasing and most honourable one, the conscientious conviction of doing what was right.
Page 41 - It is not the applause of a day, it is not the huzzas of thousands, that can give a moment's satisfaction to a rational being ; that man's mind must indeed be a weak one, and his ambition of a...
Page 37 - Mansfield advanced to the dignities of the state by rapid strides. They were not bestowed by the caprice of party favour, or affection ; they were (as was said of Pliny) liberal dispensations of power upon an object that knew how to add new lustre to that power by the rational exertion of his own. As a speaker in the House of Lords, he was without a competitor. His language was...
Page 52 - Conspicuous scene ! another yet is nigh, (More silent far) where kings and poets lie; Where Murray (long enough his country's pride) Shall be no more than Tully or than Hyde...
Page 42 - If the security of our persons and our property, of all we hold dear and valuable, are to depend upon the caprice of a giddy multitude, or to be at the disposal of a giddy mob...
Page 9 - I did not expect to hear of a refufal ; yet as I have had no long time to brood hope, and have not rioted in imaginary opulence, this cold reception has been fcarce a difappointment ; and from your Lordfhip's kindnefs I have received a benefit which men like you are able to beftow.
Page 41 - It's not the applaufe of a day, it's not the huzzas of thoufands, that can give a moment's fatisfaftion to a rational being ; that man's mind muft indeed "be a weak one, and his ambition of a moft depraved fort, who can be captivated by fuch wretched allurements, or fatisfied with fhch momentary gratifications.
Page 226 - He has more reverence for his profession, than to debauch it to unrighteous purposes; and had rather be dumb, than suffer his tongue to pimp for injustice, or club his parts, to bolster up a cheat with the legerdemain of lawcraft. He is not faced like Janus, to take a retaining fee from the plaintiff, and afterwards a backhanded bribe from the defendant; nor so doubletongued, that one may purchase his pleading, and the other at the same, or a larger price, his silence; but when he undertakes a business,...

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