A Common-school History of the United States: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time

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Mason Brothers, 1866 - 378 pages
 

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Page 349 - ... whenever any form of government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the right of the people to alter or abolish it, and to institute a new government, laying its foundations on such principles, and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their safety and happiness.
Page 327 - The conventions of a number of the states having, at the time of their adopting the constitution, expressed a desire, in order to prevent misconstruction or abuse of its powers, that further declaratory and restrictive clauses should be added...
Page 36 - IN THE NAME OF GOD, AMEN. We whose names are underwritten, the loyal subjects of our dread sovereign lord King James, by the grace of God of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, king, defender of the faith, etc. Having undertaken, for the glory of God and advancement of the Christian faith...
Page 330 - Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted. ARTICLE IX The enumeration in the Constitution of certain rights shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people.
Page 55 - I thank God there are no free schools nor printing, and I hope we shall not have, these hundred years, for learning has brought disobedience and heresies and sects into the world, and printing has divulged them and libels against the best government. God keep us from both...
Page 350 - He has called together legislative bodies, at places unusual, uncomfortable, and distant from the repository of their public records, for the sole purpose of fatiguing them into compliance with his measures.
Page 42 - We whose names are underwritten do here solemnly in the presence of Jehovah, incorporate ourselves into a Bodie Politick, and as he shall help, will .submit our persons, lives and estates unto our Lord Jesus Christ, the King of Kings and Lord of Lords, and to all those perfect and most absolute laws of his given us in his holy word of truth, to be guided and judged thereby.
Page 352 - He has combined with others to subject us to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitutions, and unacknowledged by our laws ; giving his assent to their acts of pretended legislation...
Page 260 - They had for more than a century before been regarded as beings of an inferior order and altogether unfit to associate with the white race, either in social or political relations, and so far inferior that they had no rights which the white man was bound to respect; and that the Negro might justly and lawfully be reduced to slavery for his benefit.
Page 159 - If I were an American, as I am an Englishman, while a foreign troop was landed in my country, I never would lay down my arms — Never I — never ! — never ! But, my lords, who is the man...

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