Ancient Religion and Modern Thought: By William Samuel Lilly

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Chapman and Hall, 1884 - 371 pages
 

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Page 260 - Go, wiser thou ! and, in thy scale of sense, Weigh thy opinion against Providence ; Call imperfection what thou fanciest such, Say, here he gives too little, there too much...
Page 208 - Now the God of peace, that brought again from the dead our Lord Jesus Christ, that great Shepherd of the sheep, through the blood of the everlasting covenant...
Page 149 - There are two extremes, O Bhikkhus, which the man who has given up the world ought not to follow — the habitual practice, on the one hand, of those things whose attraction depends upon the passions, and especially of sensuality — a low and pagan way (of seeking satisfaction) unworthy, unprofitable, and fit only for the worldlyminded — and the habitual practice, on the other hand, of asceticism (or self-mortification), which is painful, unworthy, and unprofitable.
Page 240 - Things and actions are what they are, and the consequences of them will be what they will be : Why then should we desire to be deceived?
Page 182 - THE sun, the moon, the stars, the seas, the hills and - the plains — Are not these, O Soul, the Vision of Him who reigns ? Is not the Vision He ? tho...
Page 150 - There is a middle path, O Bhikkhus, avoiding these two extremes, discovered by the Tathagata (ie, the Perfect One, The Buddha) — a path which opens the eyes, and bestows understanding, which leads to peace of mind, to the higher wisdom, to full enlightenment, to Nirvana!
Page 95 - To consider the world in its length and breadth, its various history, the many races of man, their starts, their fortunes, their mutual alienation, their conflicts; and then their ways, habits, governments, forms of worship ; their enterprises, their aimless courses, their random achievements and acquirements, the impotent conclusion of long-standing facts, the tokens so faint and broken of a superintending design, the blind evolution of what turn out to be great powers...
Page 96 - ... the disappointments of life, the defeat of good, the success of evil, physical pain, mental anguish, the prevalence and intensity of sin, the pervading idolatries, the corruptions, the dreary hopeless irreligion, that condition of the whole race so fearfully yet exactly described in the Apostle's words: "Having no hope and without God in the world...
Page 254 - What is the course of the life Of mortal men on the earth ? — Most men eddy about Here and there — eat and drink, Chatter and love and hate, Gather and squander, are raised Aloft, are hurl'd in the dust, Striving blindly, achieving Nothing...
Page 219 - In vain, they gaze, turn giddy, rave, and die. Religion, blushing, veils her sacred fires, And unawares Morality expires. Nor public flame, nor private dares to shine; Nor human spark is left, nor glimpse divine Lo, thy dread empire, Chaos ! is restored; Light dies before thy uncreating word : Thy hand, great Anarch, lets the curtain fall, And universal darkness buries all.

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