Hints to planters, collected from various authors and from actual observation

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Page 53 - Beneath those rugged elms, that yew-tree's shade, Where heaves the turf in many a mouldering heap, Each in his narrow cell forever laid, The rude forefathers of the hamlet sleep.
Page 1 - Like verdant isles the sable waste adorn. Let India boast her plants, nor envy we The weeping amber or the balmy tree, While by our Oaks the precious loads are born, And realms commanded which those trees adorn. Not proud Olympus yields a nobler sight, Tho...
Page 34 - Nor by me e'er shall you, You of all names the sweetest, and the best, You Muses, books, and liberty, and rest; You gardens, fields, and woods forsaken be, As long as life itself forsakes not me.
Page 31 - Howell, the famous chesnut tree of Mount Etna is one hundred and sixty feet in circumference, but quite hollow within ; which, however, affects not its verdure ; for the chesnut tree, like the willow, depends upon its bark for subsistence, and by age loses its internal part.
Page 27 - ... situations ; they, however, will grow freely almost any where, in any common soil and exposure ; but considerably the fastest and strongest in low moist land, particularly in marshy situations, by the verges of rivers, brooks, and other waters ; likewise along the sides of ditches, &c. which places often lying waste, may be employed to good advantage in plantations of willows for different purposes.
Page 24 - The leaves gathered in autumn, before the frost has injured them, make better mattresses than straw or chaff, and will last seven or eight years. The nuts, eaten raw, occasion giddiness, and severe head-ache, but baked and powdered, make a wholesome bread. In Silesia, butter is made from the oil extracted from the nut.
Page 18 - ... Memoirs of the Royal Society of Agriculture at Paris, for the year 1787, there is an essay by M. le President de la Tour d'Aigues, on the culture of the larch; in which it is celebrated as one of the most useful of all timber trees. He tells us, that in his own garden he has rails, which were put up in the year 1743, partly of oak, and partly of larch. The former, he says, have yielded to time ; but the latter are still sound. And in his castle of Tour d'Aigues, he has larchen beams of twenty...
Page 17 - ... among the contractors for the French dock-yards. In the Memoirs of the Royal Society of Agriculture at Paris, for the year 1787, there is an essay by M. le President de la Tour d'Aigues, on the culture of the larch; in which it is celebrated as one of the most useful of all timber trees. He tells us, that in his own garden he has rails, which were put up in the year 1743, partly of oak, and partly of larch. The former, he says, have yielded to time ; but the latter are still sound. And in his...
Page 25 - For come without the pains of planting grow. With osiers thus the banks of brooks abound. Sprung from the watery genius of the ground : From the same principle gray willows eome ; Herculean poplar, and the tender broom.
Page 31 - Chesnut, though unequal to the Oak, the Beech, and the Esculus, has a degree of greatness belonging to it which recommends it strongly to the gardener's attention. Its Uses have been highly extolled ; and it may deserve a considerable share of the praise which has been given it. As a substitute for the Oak, it is preferable to the Elm : For...

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