Detroit Review of Medicine & Pharmacy, 11. köide

Front Cover
E.B. Smith & Company, 1876
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 270 - THERE is no flock, however watched and tended, But one dead lamb is there ! There is no fireside, howsoe'er defended, But has one vacant chair ! The air is full of farewells to the dying, And mournings for the dead ; The heart of Rachel, for her children crying, Will not be comforted...
Page 349 - There shall be no more thence an infant of days, nor an old man that hath not filled his days: for the child shall die an hundred years old ; but the sinner being an hundred years old shall be accursed.
Page 271 - ... that this last shall unawares have spoken what he imagines himself only to have thought ; if such revelations be received without tumult, and acknowledged not so often by an uttered sympathy as by silence, an inarticulate breath, and here and there a word, to indicate that all is understood ; if to these qualifications of a confidant be joined the advantages afforded by his recognized...
Page 341 - ... matter upon the earth. For when this matter is dissolved or suspended in water, in that state of comminution and decay which immediately precedes its final decomposition into the elementary gases, and its consequent return from the organic to the inorganic world, these wakeful members of nature's invisible police are everywhere ready to arrest the fugitive organized particles, and turn them back into the ascending stream of animal life.
Page 170 - Alas ! — how light a cause may move Dissension between hearts that love ! Hearts that the world in vain had tried, And sorrow but more closely tied ; That stood the storm, when waves were rough, Yet in a sunny hour fall off, Like ships that have gone down at sea, When heaven was all tranquillity...
Page 606 - When bad men combine, the good must associate; else they will fall, one by one, an unpitied sacrifice in a contemptible struggle.
Page 271 - ... himself only to have thought; if such revelations be received without tumult, and acknowledged not so often by an uttered sympathy as by silence, an inarticulate breath, and here and there a word, to indicate that all is understood; if to these qualifications of a confidant be joined the advantages afforded by his recognized character as a physician; — then, at some inevitable moment, will the soul of the sufferer be dissolved, and flow forth in a dark, but transparent stream, bringing all...
Page 271 - ... prominent characteristics of his own ; if he have the power, which must be born with him, to bring his mind into such affinity with his patient's, that this last shall unawares have spoken what he imagines himself only to have thought...
Page 504 - Curtis and L. Curtis, this committee. On motion of Prof. Biddle, the following resolution was unanimously adopted : No degree in medicine should be conferred, under any circumstances, except after an examination in person of the candidate upon all the branches of medicine.
Page 330 - The secretion of milk proceeds best in a tranquil state of mind, and with a cheerful temper : then the milk is regularly abundant, and agrees well with the child. On the contrary, a fretful temper lessens the quantity of milk, makes it thin and serous, and causes it to disturb the child's bowels, producing intestinal fever and much griping.

Bibliographic information