American Presbyterian Review

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Henry Boynton Smith, James Manning Sherwood
C. Scribner, 1871
 

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Page 192 - How small , of all that human hearts endure , That part which laws or kings can cause or cure.
Page 559 - Think not that I am come to destroy the law, or the prophets: I am not come to destroy, but to fulfill. For verily I say unto you, Till heaven and earth pass, one jot or one tittle shall in no wise pass from the law, till all be fulfilled.
Page 297 - For though I preach the gospel, I have nothing to glory of: for necessity is laid upon me ; yea, woe is unto me, if I preach not the gospel...
Page 348 - Behold, the hire of the labourers who have reaped down your fields, which is of you kept back by fraud, crieth : and the cries of them which have reaped are entered into the ears of the Lord of Sabaoth.
Page 326 - ... all vital action may, with equal propriety, be said to be the result of the molecular forces of the protoplasm which displays it. And if so, it must be true, in the same sense and to the same extent, that the thoughts to which I am now giving utterance, and your thoughts regarding them, are the expression of molecular changes in that matter of life which is the source of our other vital phenomena.
Page 190 - The waters wear the stones: thou washest away the things which grow out of the dust of the earth ; and thou destroyest the hope of man.
Page 63 - That King James II., having endeavoured to subvert the constitution of the kingdom, by breaking the original contract between king and people ; and by the advice of Jesuits and other wicked persons, having violated the fundamental laws and having withdrawn himself out of the kingdom, has abdicated the government, and that the throne is thereby vacant.
Page 193 - Ill fares the land, to hastening ills a prey, Where wealth accumulates, and men decay : Princes and lords may flourish, or may fade ; A breath can make them as a breath has made ; But a bold peasantry, their country's pride, When once destroyed, can never be supplied.
Page 564 - And said, For this cause shall a man leave father and mother, and shall cleave to his wife : and they twain shall be one flesh ? 6 Wherefore they are no more twain, but one flesh.
Page 563 - Again ye have heard that it hath been said by them of old time, Thou shalt not, forswear thyself, but shalt perform unto the Lord thine oaths...

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