Van Nostrand's Engineering Magazine, 19. köide

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D. Van Nostrand, 1878
 

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Page 403 - Nature by the same kind of reasoning from mechanical principles, for I am induced by many reasons to suspect that they may all depend upon certain forces by which the particles of bodies, by some causes hitherto unknown, are either mutually impelled towards one another, and cohere in regular figures, or are repelled and recede from one another.
Page 408 - ... forms ? Again, if we turn from Art to Letters, truth to nature and to fact is undoubtedly a characteristic of sterling literature ; and yet in the delineation of outward nature itself, still more in that of feelings and affections, of the secret parts of character and motives of conduct, it frequently happens that the writer is driven to imagery, to an analogy, or even to a paradox, in order to give utterance to that of which there is no direct counterpart in recognised speech. And yet which...
Page 288 - No. 7. SURCHARGED AND DIFFERENT FORMS OF RETAINING. walls. By James S. Tate, CE No.
Page 402 - And, therefore, as the solitariness of mathematics has been a frequent theme of discourse, it may be not altogether unprofitable to dwell for a short time upon the other side of the question, and to inquire whether there be not points of contact in method or in subjectmatter between mathematics and the outer world which have been frequently overlooked ; whether its lines do not in some cases run parallel to those of other occupations and purposes of life ; and lastly, whether we may not hope for...
Page 375 - ... is volatile, some of it is launched into the air, on its escape from combination ; and in the air it is always found. As it is soluble in water, it is found wherever we find water on the surface of the earth, or in the air, and probably in all natural waters, even the deepest and most purified. As a part of the atmosphere, it touches all substances and can be found on many ; it is in reality universally on the surface of the earth in the presence of men and animals, perhaps attached more or less...
Page 410 - ... infinite ; hence space as a plenum of spheres is fourfold. And, generally, space as a plenum of surfaces has a mani-foldness equal to the number of constants required to determine the surface. Although it would be beyond our present purpose to attempt to pursue the subject further, it should not pass unnoticed that the identity in the four-fold character of space, as derived on the one hand from a system of straight lines, and on the other from a system of spheres, is intimately connected with...
Page 408 - ... inward response to imaginative poetry, to social fiction, or even to those tales of giant and fairyland written, it is supposed, only for the nursery or schoolroom ? But in order thus to reanimate these things with a meaning beyond that of the mere words, have we not to re-consider our first position, to enlarge the ideas with which we started ; have we not to cast about for...
Page 408 - ... which we are at present capable fails to give an actual representation of these quantities ; if they must for the present be relegated to the category of imaginaries ; it still does not follow that we may not at some future time find a law which will endow them with reality, nor that in the meantime we need hesitate to employ them, in accordance with the great principle of continuity, for bringing out correct results. If, moreover, both in Geometry and in Algebra we occasionally make use of points...
Page 346 - The city wall is brought down on both sides to the edge of the stream: thence, from the corners of the wall, there is carried along each bank of the river a fence of burnt bricks. The houses are mostly three and four...
Page 375 - the facts now to be given enable us to claim for it a still more important place. The application seems to fit well the conditions already examined; and by this means currents from foul places have been readily found. This does not apply to the substances which may be called germs whether it be possible to see them or not, because these are not bodies which have passed into the ammoniacal stage, although some of them may be passing — those, for example, which are purely chemical and exert what...

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