A History of Modern Philosophy: A Sketch of the History of Philosophy from the Close of the Renaissance to Our Own Day, 2. köide

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Macmillan & Company, limited, 1900
 

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Page 397 - I now had opinions; a creed, a doctrine, a philosophy; in one among the best senses of the word, a religion...
Page 380 - But the thing a man does practically believe (and this is often enough without asserting it even to himself, much less to others) ; the thing a man does practically lay to heart, and know for certain, concerning his vital relations to this mysterious Universe, and his duty and destiny there, that is in all cases the primary thing for him, and creatively determines all the rest.
Page 86 - whether in thine own person or in that of any other, in every case as an end withal, never as a means only.
Page 428 - If, instead of the glad tidings that there exists a Being in whom all the excellences which the highest human mind can conceive, exist in a. degree inconceivable to us, I am informed that the world is ruled by a Being whose attributes are infinite, but what they are we cannot learn, nor what are the principles of his government, except that the highest human...
Page 428 - ... the highest human morality which we are capable of conceiving" does not sanction them; convince me of it, and I will bear my fate as I may. But when I am told that I must believe this, and at the same time call this being by the names which express and affirm the highest human morality, I say in plain terms that I will not. Whatever power such a being may have over me, there is one thing which he shall not do: he shall not compel me to worship him. I will call no being good, who is not what I...
Page 587 - Bentham's idea of the world is that of a collection of persons pursuing each his separate interest or pleasure, and the prevention of whom from jostling one another more than is unavoidable, may be attempted by hopes and fears derived from three sources — the law, religion, and public opinion.
Page 378 - and the epitome of all Laboratories and Observatories with their ' results, in his single head, — is but a Pair of Spectacles behind
Page 398 - But my zeal was as yet little else, at that period of my life, than zeal for speculative opinions. It had not its root in genuine benevolence, or sympathy with mankind; though these qualities held their due place in my ethical standard. Nor was it connected with any high enthusiasm for ideal nobleness.
Page 399 - Those only are happy (I thought) who have their minds fixed on some object other than their own happiness; on the happiness of others, on the improvement of mankind, even on some art or pursuit, followed not as a means, but as itself an ideal end. Aiming thus at something else, they find happiness by the way.

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