Annals & Magazine of Natural History

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Taylor & Francis, Limited, 1877
 

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Page 342 - On, SOME ORGANISMS LIVING at GREAT DEPTHS in the NORTH ATLANTIC OCEAN.
Page 356 - ... and other phytophagous or vegetable-eating animals exceedingly precarious. It is highly probable that a careful investigation in this direction will lead us to the conclusion that the land mollusks which inhabit arid areas have, through selection, adaptation, and evolution, become especially fitted for the contingencies of their habitat, and possess a greater degree of vitality or ability to live without food than related forms in what may be considered more...
Page ii - Animal, Leyden, 1767. The sylvan powers Obey our summons ; from their deepest dells The Dryads come, and throw their garlands wild And odorous branches at our feet ; the Nymphs That press with nimble step the mountain-thyme And purple heath-flower come not empty-handed. But scatter round ten thousand forms minute Of velvet moss or lichen, torn from rock Or rifted oak or cavern deep : the Naiads too Quit their loved native stream, from whose smooth face They crop the lily, and each sedge and rush...
Page 355 - Veaichii) from Cerros Island, even more remarkable, the latter having lived without food from 1859, the year when it was collected, to March, 1865, a period of six years. The famous specimen in the British Museum which is cited in the books, Helix desertorum, had lived within a few days of four years, fastened to a tablet in one of the cases, when discovered to be alive. Helix desertorum, as the specific name implies, is found in arid and sterile areas, in the continents of Africa and Asia, and has,...
Page 428 - ... water, which in all cases is precarious in this latitude, and once more stood at bay. Their foes came, and for one long month fought and were beaten back, and returned day after day to the attack as merciless and inevitable as the tide. Meanwhile, the families of the defenders were evacuating and moving south, and bravely did their protectors shield them till they were all safely a hundred miles away. The besiegers were beaten back and went away. But the narrative tells us that the hollows of...
Page 276 - It is of the ordinary species, about 5 inches in height, 6 inches in diameter at the top, and about 2 inches at the base. It is perfectly formed, and the base bears the distinct impression of the cable, and a few fibres of the coir rope used as a sheath for the telegraphic wire still adhering to it. As the cable has been laid only four years, it is evident that this specimen must have grown to its present height in that time, which seems to prove that the growth of coral is much more rapid than has...
Page 265 - By Harry Govier Seeley, Esq., FLS, PGS, etc. In this paper the author described a cervical and a dorsal vertebra of a new species of Crocodile. The former is probably the last cervical. It is 2J inches long, and differs from that of existing Crocodiles in the large size of the parapophyses, the distinct anterior notch in the neural arch for the vertebral nerve, and the perfect convexity of the articular ball. The dorsal vertebra is the sixth or seventh ; it measures 2£ inches in length, and shows...
Page 262 - In this paper the author described a thin bed composed chiefly of remains of fishes, which rests immediately upon the " Better-bed Coal " of the Lower Coal-measures in Yorkshire. The bed varies from a quarter to...
Page 355 - Helix desertorum, as the specific name implies, is found in arid and sterile areas, in the continents of Africa and Asia, and has, as will be perceived, a wide distribution. From the former continent, I have specimens from Egypt, and it also ranges through Arabia in the latter. The Bulimus from the mainland of the peninsula of Lower California, and Helix Veatchii from Cerros or Cedros Island, off the coast on the ocean side of the same, come from within the same physical environment, being comparatively...
Page ii - And odorous branches at our feet ; the Nymphs That press with nimble step the mountain-thyme And purple heath-flower come not empty-handed. But scatter round ten thousand forms minute Of velvet moss or lichen, torn from rock Or rifted oak or cavern deep : the Naiads too Quit their loved native stream, from whose smooth face They crop the lily, and each sedge and rush That drinks the rippling tide: the frozen poles, Where peril waits the bold adventurer's tread, The burning sands of Borneo and Cayenne,...

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