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The quotations from Shakespeare, Milton, and Pope, are made on a principle that will probably commend itself to all. To have quoted the passages in full would have taken up a large part of the volume. To omit all quotations from them was impossible.

Though this volume contains upwards of six hundred extracts from more than two hundred and fifty authors, admirers of particular writers will probably feel disappointed that some of their favourite passages are not here given. The fact is, it would have been easier to fill many volumes than one. Selection and omission have been the most difficult part of the editor's task.

It will be carefully noted that, as in the preceding volume, the works of living authors are not included ; nor are those of American writers.

The Editor desires to add that for the Notes on pages 65, 68, 70, 78, 81, 86, 202, 205, 220, 222, 238, 309, 310, 311, 338, 357, 365, 368, 372, 426, 427, 435, 445, 504, as well as for several important Extructs, he is indebted to Demaus's Class Book of English Prose, and SCRIMGEOUR’s Poetry and Poets of Britain, - both admirable works of their class, published by A. and C. Black, Edinburgh.

The references in italics, within parentheses, at the commencement of each section, thus (Hundbook, par. 7), direct the reader to those paragraphs in Tre Handbook of English Literature which give the history and criticise the writings of the author from whom the passage is takeu.

CONTENTS

CHAPTER III,

English Literature from Chaucer to Shakespeare, A.D. 1350-1600.

30. GEOFFREY CHAUCER, 1328-1400. 48. HENRY HOWARD, 1516-1547.

The Flower and the Leaf, 40;

Virgil's Æneid, Book ii., 78; No

Prologue to Canterbury Tales,

age content, 78; Spring, a sonnet,

40; The Parson, 42; The Choice

79.

of Friends, 43; Good Counsell of

49. John Foxe, 1517-1587.

Chaucer, 45.

The Story of Bishop Ridley, 80.

31. TRANSLATIONS OF THE BIBLE, 1380-

50. WM. CECIL, Ld. Burleigh, 1520-1598.

1534.

Letter to his Son, 82.

Wycliffe, 46; Tyndale, 46; Apo-

logy for the Lollard Doctrines, 51. JOHN JEWELL, 1522-1571.

49.

The Roman Catholic claim to

32. John GOWER, d. 1402.

Antiquity, 85.

Rosiphele's Vision of Ladies, 50. 52. RICHARD EDWARDS and LORD VAUX,

33. SIR JOHN MANDEVILLE, 11. 1356.

1520-1566.

The Dead Sea, 51; Why the Ma-

The falling out of faithful

hometans never drink Wine, 51.

Friends, 87; Of a contented

34. CHEVY CHASE, 1400-1450.

Mind, 87.

Original version of the Ballad, 52. 53. THOMAS TUSSER, 1523-1580.
35. Johx LYDGATE, 1375?-1430?

Proverbs, etc., 88.
God's Providence, 57; The Lon-

54. GEORGE GASCOGNE, 1540-1577.

don Lackpenny, 58.

Men would rather seem than be,

36. JAYES I. of Scotland, 1394-1437,

89; Echo verse, 89.
James first beholds Lady Jane,
59.

55. THOMAS SACKVILLE, 1536-1608.

37. WILLIAM CAXTON, 1412-1492.

Remorse, Dread, etc., 90.

The Prologue, 59; How a Wo. 56. SIB WALTER RALEIGA, 1552-1618.
man ought to obey her Hus-

The Soul's Errand, 91; The Pas-

band, 60.

sionate Shepherd, by Marlowe,

38. ROBERT HENRYSON, d. 1508.

92; The Nymph's Reply, by

The Garment of Good Ladies, 61.

Raleigh, 92; Man a little World,

39. WILLIAM DUNBAR, 1460-1520?

93; The transitory Nature of

The Dance of the Seven Deadly

Human Happiness, 94; l'ho

Sins, 63; Eartbly Joy returns in

Power of Death, 96.

Pain, 63.

57. EDMUND SPENSER, 1553-1599.

40. GAWAIN DOUGLAS, 1474-1522.

Una and the Lion, 97; The Min-

The May Morning, 63.

istry of Angels, 98; The Sea-

41. JOHN SKELTON, d. 1529.

sons, 98 ; Sonnet xxvi., 99; The

On Wolsey, 64.

Home of Mammon, 100; An

42. Hogy LATIMER, 14757-1558.

Elegie on the Death of Sir P.

Against Bribery in Judges, 65;

Sidney, 101; A Hymn of Hea-

The Devila diligent Preacher, 67.

venly Beautie, vol.

43. SIR THOMAS MORE, 1480-1535.

38. RICHARD HOOKER, 1553-1600.

Letter to Lady More, 69; Occu-

Extracts on Law, Christ's Rigb-

pations of the Utopians, 70;

teousness, etc., 102.

Richarde the Thirde, 72.

59. JOHN LYLY, 1553-1600.

44. Ste David LYNDSAY, 1490-1557.

Counsaile, 104; A Cooling Carde,

Grievances of a Scottish Peasant,

104; Delightfull Devises, 105;

72; Exactions of the Law, 73.

The Trial of a faithful Friend,

45. JOHN BALE, 1495-1563.

106.

From Kynge Joban, 74.

60. FULKE GREVILLE, Lord Brooke,

46. SIR THOMAS Wyat, 1503-1541.

1554-1628.

Blame not my Lute, 74

Imagination, 106; Reality of a

47. ROGER A SCHAM, 1515-1568.

True Religion, 107.

Occupations to be suited to Men's 61. SIR PHILIP SIDNEY, 1554-1586.

Faculties, 75; Love a mightier

Defence of Poesy, 108; In praise

Power than Fear, 77.

of Poetry, ito.

CHAPTER IV.

The Seventeenth Century.

§ 1. THE REIGN OF JAMES I., 1603-1625.

72. SIR THOMAS OVERBURY, d. 1613. 78. RICHARD SIBBES, 1577-1635.
The Milkmaid, 143; A Franklin,

Falth sustained by Reason, 164.

144; A Pedant, 145; A Wife, 145.

73. EDWARD FAIRFAX, d. 1632.

79. ROBERT BURTON, 1576–1640.

Cure of Discontent, 170.

From Tasso's Jerusalem, 145.

74. FRANCIS BACON, 1561-1626.

80. GEORGE SANDYS, 1577-1643.

Of Studies, 146; Of Adversity,

The Dirge of King David, 174;

147; Errors of Learning, 148;

Psalm Lxviii., 174.

Extracts, 152.

81. THOMAS ADAMS, 1580–1656.

75. Joux DONNE, 1573–1631.

A Learned Ministry, 175; Po-

Sonnets, 154; Hymn to Christ,

pish Pleas, 175.

155; The Will, 156; To God

the Father, 157; Extracts, 157. 82. JOHN HALES, 1584-1656.

76. JOSEPH HALL, 1574-1656.

Schism, 176; Antiquity, 177.

The Male-Content, 159; How to

83. PHINEAS and GILES FLETCHER, 1584-

Spend our Days, 160; Occasional

1650.

Meditations, 162; Satires, What

Agneia and Parthenia, 178; On

would you have ? 163.

despising Poverty, 179; The

77. BEN JONSON, 1574-1637.

Demand of Justice, 179.

To Shakespeare, 165; To Celia,

165; The Holy Trinity, 166;

84. William DRUMMOND, 1585-1649.

Triumph of Charis, 167; Epi-

Sonnets, 180; On King James,

181.

taph, 167; On Learning, etc., 168.

$ 2. FROM THE DEATH OF JAMES I. TO THE RESTORATION.

85. GEORGE WITHER, 1588-1667. 87. THOMAS CAREW, 1589?-1639.

The Steadfast Shepherd, 182; A

Song, 189

Hymn for a Widower, 182; The

88. ROBERT HERRICK, 1591-1674.
Author's Hymn, 183 ; Poor and

To Daffodils, 190; Cherry Ripe,

Content, 183; Shall I wasting in

190; Thanksgiving, 190.

Despair ? 184.

89. HENRY KING, 1591-1669.

86. Thomas HOBBES, 1588-1679.

The Dirge, 191.

Precision in the use of Language, 90. FRANCIS QUARLES, 1592-1644.

184; Man's natural state-

Delight in God only, 191; Ah!

War, 186; The Leviathan, 187;

wbither shall I fly? 192; Froni

Laughter and Weeping, 187;

the Enchiridion, Emblems, Hie.

Extracts, 188.

roglyphics, 193.

91. IZAAK Walton, 1593-1683.

101. OWEN FELTHAM, d. 1678.

Thankful Content, 1994.

Of Truth and Bitterness in Jest,

92. GEORGE HERPERT, 1593-1632.

236; Of reconciling Enemles,
Sunday, 196; Virtue, 198; From

237.

the Church Porch, 198.

102. RICHARD CRASHAW, d. 1650.

93. JAMES SHIRLEY, 1594-1650.

Speech of Satan, 239; Lines on

The Triumphs of Death, 199.

a Prayer-Book, 239.

94. John EARLE, 1601-1665.

A Child, 199; A Sceptick, 200. 103. JEREMY TAYLOR, 1613-1667.

95. WM. CHILLINGWORTH, 1602–1644.

On Content, 240; Against AD.
Scripture easier understood than

ger, 241; Prayer never out of

Councils of the Church, 202;

Season, 242; Marriage, 243; A

The Religion of Protestants, 204.

good Man the only true Friend,

244

96. EDMUND WALLEB, 1605–1687,

Song, 206; On a Girdle, 206; The 104. ROBERT LEIGHTON, 1613-1684.
Death of Cromwell, 207 ; Naval

Love unfeigned, 246; He him-

Glory of England, 207.

self bare our Sins, 246; Saints

97. SIR THOMAS BROWNE, 1605-1682.

made holy on earth, 247; Leigh-

Urn Burial, 207; Man the great

ton and Coleridge, 247.
Mystery, 211; Extracts, 212. 105. John PEARSON, 161 2–1687.

98. THOMAS FULLER, 1608–1661.

Reconciliation, 248.

Of Books, 212; Extracts, 213; 106. HENRY VAUGHAN, 1618–1695.

The Faithful Minister, 214.

Morning, 249; Praise, 249; The

99. Joan MILTON, 1608-1674.

Search, 250; Son-dayes, 250.

From the Areopagitica, 220; On

the Civil War, 223 ; Passages

107. HENRY MORE, 1614–1687.

Prudence sometimes Craft, 251;

from his Poetry, 225.

The Soul all Eye and Ear, 251,

100. EDWARD HYDE, Earl of Clarendon,

1609-1674.

108. RICHARD BAXTER, 1615–1691.

Character of Hampden, 231;

Vanity of Knowledge, 251;

Death of Lord Falkland, 233.

And they made light of it, 254.

$ 3. FROM THE RESTORATION TO THE DEATH OF WILLIAM III.

109. SAMUEL BUTLER, 1612-1680.

117. ALGERNON SIDNEY, 1621-1684.

Sir Hudibras and his accom-

Influence of Government, 273.

plishments, 256; Modern War-

118. DAVID CLARKSON, 1622–1686.

fare Satirised, 258; Weakness

Godly Sorrow, 275.

and Misery of Man, 258; Ex-

tracts, 259.

119. WILLIAM BATES, 1625-1699.

Examples of Spiritual Perfec-

110. SIR JOHN DENHAM, 1615-1668.

tion, 275.

The Thames, 260.

120. ROBERT BOYLE, 1626–1691.

III. JOHN OWEN, 1616–168).

Texts in their Connexion, 278;

The Self-evidencing Power of

Above reason-not necessarily

Scripture, 261; The Love of

against it, 279.

God, 263.

121. Locy HUTCHINSON, 1620-1659.

112 RALPH CUDWORTH, 1617-1688.

Character of Col. Hutchinson,

Morality eternal and immu.

280.

table, 264.

113. ABRAHAM COWLEY, 1618-1667.

122. JOHN FLAVEL, 1627–1691.

Hymn to Light, 264; Life and

Signs of Maturity of Grace, 284.

Fame, 265; Vision of Oliver 123. JOHN BUNYAN, 1628–1688.
Cromwell, 266; Extracts, 269.

Christian at the Cross, 285; The

114. SIR RICHARD LOVELACE, 1618–1658.

Town of Mansoul, 286.

To Althea from Prison, 270. 124. SIR WILLIAM TEMPLE, 1628–1698.

115. JOSEPH BEAUMONT, 1615–1699.

Character of the English, 288;

Bad Times, 271; Content, 271;

Ancient and Modern Learning,

Vicissitude, 271.

289; Aphorisms, 292.

116. ANDREW MARVEL, 1620-1678. 125. John Ray, 1628-1705.

Charater of Parker, 272; The

God, the Author of Civilisation,

Emigrants, 273.

293 ; Syllables, 296.

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