Topography of Great Britain: Or, British Traveller's Directory: Cornwall

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 40 - The palace itself is so encompassed with parks full of deer, delicious gardens, groves ornamented with trelliswork, cabinets of verdure, and walks so embrowned by trees, that it seems to be a place pitched upon by Pleasure herself, to dwell in along with Health. In the pleasure and artificial gardens are many columns and pyramids of marble, two fountains that spout water one round the other like a pyramid, upon which are perched small birds that stream water out of their bills. In the Grove of Diana...
Page 140 - ... attachment to Queen Anne exposed him to a long and severe Persecution ; he bore it with firmness of mind ; he passed the latter part of his time at home, the Enemy of no national Party : the Friend of no Faction.
Page 71 - Who join'd pure Faith to strong poetic powers, Who, in reviving Reason's lucid hours, Sought on one book his troubled mind to rest, And rightly deem'd the Book of God the best 1 . ORIENTAL ECLOGUES.
Page 69 - ... cherries had taken their farewell of England. This secret he performed by straining a tent or cover of canvas over the whole tree, and wetting the same now and then with a scoop or horn as the heat of the weather required ; and so by withholding the...
Page 155 - William who found himself on the brink of destruction, hastened with a select band to the relief of his dismayed forces : his presence restored the action ; the English were obliged to retire with loss ; and the duke, ordering his second line to advance, renewed the attack with fresh forces, and with redoubled courage. Finding that the enemy, aided by the advantage of ground, and animated by the example of their...
Page 40 - ... so many statues that seem to breathe, so many miracles of consummate art, so many casts that rival even the perfection of Roman antiquity, that it may well claim and justify its name of Nonesuch, being without an equal ; or, as the Poet sung, This, which no equal has in art or fame, Britons deservedly do Nonesuch name.
Page 40 - VIII. for his pleasure and retirement, and built by him with an excess of magnificence and elegance, even to ostentation: one would imagine everything that architecture can perform to have been employed in this one work.
Page 118 - The lead was perfectly sound, and presented not the least chink or crevice for the admission of air. The moisture of the flesh had not yet left the bones, and the fallen beard lay on the under jaw.
Page 118 - ... complete skeleton of a body that had been interred about sixty years, whose leg and thigh bones, to the utter astonishment of all present, were covered with myriads of flies (of a species, perhaps, totally unknown to the naturalist) as active and strong on the wing as gnats flying in the air, on the finest evening in summer. The wings of this non-descript are white, and for distinction's sake, the spectators gave it the name of the coffinfly.
Page 40 - In the pleasure and artificial gardens are many columns and pyramids of marble, two fountains that spout water one round the other like a pyramid, upon which are perched small birds that stream water out of their bills : in the grove of Diana is a very agreeable fountain, with Actaeon turned into a stag, as he was sprinkled by the goddess and her nymphs, with inscriptions. There is besides another pyramid of marble full of concealed pipes, which spirt upon all who come within their reach.

Bibliographic information