Lectures on the Philosophy of the Mind, 3. köide

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William Tait, 1846
 

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Page 333 - Stood on my feet: about me round I saw Hill, dale, and shady woods, and sunny plains, And liquid lapse of murmuring streams...
Page 351 - Annual for me, the grape, the rose, renew The juice nectareous, and the balmy dew ; For me, the mine a thousand treasures brings; For me, health gushes from a thousand springs ; Seas roll to waft me, suns to light me rise ; My footstool earth, my canopy the skies.
Page 148 - IF you should see a flock of pigeons in a field of corn; and if (instead of each picking where and what it liked, taking just as much as it wanted, and no more) you should see ninety-nine of them gathering all they got into a heap; reserving nothing for themselves but the chaff and the refuse; keeping this heap for one, and that the weakest perhaps...
Page 298 - ... bitter potion to a distempered state. Times, and occasions, and provocations, will teach their own lessons. The wise will determine from the gravity of the case ; the irritable from sensibility to oppression; the high-minded from disdain and indignation at abusive power in unworthy hands ; the brave and bold from the love of honourable danger in a generous cause : but, with or without right, a revolution will be the very last resource of the thinking and the good. The third head of right, asserted...
Page 120 - Know then this truth (enough for man to know), " Virtue alone is happiness below.' The only point where human bliss stands still, And tastes the good without the fall to ill ; Where only merit constant pay receives, Is...
Page 350 - It is a happy world after all. The air, the earth, the water, teem with delighted existence. In a spring noon, or a summer evening, on whichever side I turn my eyes, myriads of happy beings crowd upon my view. " The insect youth are on the wing ;" swarms of new-born flies are trying their pinions in the air.
Page 72 - the doing good to mankind, in obedience to the will of God, and for the sake of everlasting happiness.
Page 349 - Who for thy table feeds the wanton fawn, For him as kindly spread the flowery lawn: Is it for thee the lark ascends and sings? Joy tunes his voice, joy elevates his wings. Is it for thee the linnet pours his throat ? Loves of his own and raptures swell the note.
Page 349 - Is it for thee the lark ascends and sings? Joy tunes his voice, joy elevates his wings. Is it for thee the linnet pours his throat? Loves of his own and raptures swell the note. The bounding steed you pompously bestride, Shares with his lord the pleasure and the pride. Is thine alone the seed that strews the plain? The birds of heaven shall vindicate their grain.
Page 468 - That something still which prompts th' eternal sigh, For which we bear to live, or dare to die ; Which still so near us, yet beyond us lies, O'erlook'd, seen double, by the fool and wise.

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