English Critical Essays: (sixteenth, Seventeenth, and Eighteenth Centuries)

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Edmund David Jones
H. Milford, Oxford University Press, 1922 - 460 pages
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Page 82 - I loved the man, and do honour his memory, on this side idolatry, as much as any. He was (indeed) honest, and of an open and free nature; had an excellent phantasy, brave notions, and gentle expressions...
Page 89 - For though the Poet's matter Nature be His art doth give the fashion. And that he Who casts to write a living line, must sweat (Such as thine are), and strike the second heat Upon the Muses...
Page 226 - In words, as fashions, the same rule will hold; Alike fantastic, if too new, or old: Be not the first by whom the new are tried, Nor yet the last to lay the old aside.
Page 78 - The use of this feigned history hath been to give some shadow of satisfaction to the mind of man in those points wherein the nature of things doth deny it; the world being in proportion inferior to the soul; by reason whereof there is agreeable to the spirit of man a more ample greatness, a more exact goodness, and a more absolute variety, than can be found in the nature of things.
Page 420 - Church-yard' abounds with images which find a mirror in every mind, and with sentiments to which every bosom returns an echo.
Page 227 - Who haunt Parnassus but to please their ear, Not mend their minds ; as some to church repair, Not for the doctrine but the music there. These equal syllables alone require, Though oft the ear the open vowels tire, While expletives their feeble aid do join, And ten low words oft creep in one dull line : While they ring round the same unvaried chimes, With sure returns of still expected rhymes ; Where'er you find " the cooling western breeze...
Page 82 - I loved the man, and do honour his memory on this 'side idolatry as much as any. He was, indeed, honest, and of an open and free nature ; had an excellent fantasy, braye notions, and gentle expressions, wherein he flowed with that facility that sometimes it was necessary he should be stopped.
Page 26 - By and by we hear news of shipwreck in the same place: then we are to blame if we accept it not for a rock. Upon the back of that comes out a hideous monster with fire and smoke, and then the miserable beholders are bound to take it for a cave: while in the mean time two armies fly in, represented with four swords and bucklers, and then what hard heart will not receive it for a pitched field?
Page 221 - Some beauties yet no precepts can declare, For there's a happiness as well as care. Music resembles poetry, in each Are nameless graces which no methods teach, And which a master-hand alone can reach.

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