A New and General Biographical Dictionary: Containing an Historical and Critical Account of the Lives and Writings of the Most Eminent Persons in Every Nation; Particularly the British and Irish; from the Earliest Accounts of Time to the Present Period ...

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G. G. and J. Robinson, 1798
 

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Page 180 - and tell you a truth, which perchance you will marvel at. One of the greatest benefits that ever God gave me, is, that he sent me so sharp and severe parents, and so gentle a schoolmaster. For when I am in presence either of father or mother ; whether I speak, keep silence, sit, stand, or go, eat, drink, be merry, or sad, be sewing, playing, dancing, or doing...
Page 311 - He was very temperate in diet, and a supreme governor over all his passions and affections, and had thereby a great power over other men's. He was of an industry and vigilance not to be tired out or wearied by the most laborious, and of parts not to be imposed upon by the most subtle or sharp, and of a personal courage equal to his best parts...
Page 181 - Elmer ; who teacheth me so gently, so pleasantly, with such fair allurements to learning, that I think all the time nothing while I am with him.
Page 311 - ... of a personal courage equal to his best parts ; so that he was an enemy not to be wished wherever he might have been made a friend, and as much to be apprehended, where he was so, as any man could deserve to be ; and therefore his death was no less pleasing to the one party, than it was condoled in the other.
Page 333 - I thought they did conceive, but only the doctrine therein contained, yet would many be glad to touch it, to embrace it, to kiss it, to hold it to their breasts and heads, and stroke over all their body with it to show their hungry desire of that knowledge which was spoken of.
Page 275 - Wood ; but his principal work, and that for which he is most known, is " An Apology or Declaration of the Power and Providence of God in the Government of the World, proving that it doth not decay, &c.
Page 368 - Pretty ! in amber to observe the forms Of hairs, or straws, or dirt, or grubs, or worms ! The things, we know, are neither rich nor rare, But wonder how the devil they got there.
Page 312 - Or wak'd to extafy the living lyre. But Knowledge to their eyes her ample page Rich with the fpoils of Time did ne'er unroll ; Chill Penury reprefs'd their noble rage, And froze the genial current of the foul.
Page 311 - ... the education whereof he committed to other men ; so far disguising his own designs, that he seemed seldom to wish more than was concluded ; and in many gross conclusions, which would hereafter contribute to designs not yet set on foot, when he found them sufficiently...
Page 311 - ... faculties to govern the people, of any man I ever knew. For the first year of the parliament, he seemed rather to moderate and soften the violent and distempered humours, than to inflame them.

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