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LESSON XI.

In this and the remaining lessons the particular ex. ercises in Position and Breathing will be omitted, but it is not intended that they should be neglected in the class drill. Exercises, similar to those presented in the previous lessons, should form part of every class exercise. It is not the purpose of the work to present every exercise that should be given to pupils; much will be left for the teacher to supply.

1. Exercises in Position.
2. Exercises in Gesture.
3. Exercises in Breathing.

rock,

EXERCISES IN ARTICULATION.

Ď, as in odd. not,

nod,
rob,
on,

sod.
1. Let the carrion rot.
2. Odd! 'tis very odd indeed.
3. And the rock shall rear its head.
4. Unconsciously he executes the will of God.
5. Stop! for thy tread is on an empire's dust.

EXERCISES IN ORAL EXPULSIVE.
Repeat the sounds, words, and exercises in Expulsive
Form, Oral Quality.

1. e, as in me.
2. ä,

ale.
3. ā,

oak.

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arm.

4. O,

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2. Take a message and a token, to some distant friends of mine.

EXERCISES

Contrasting Oral Orotund and Pure Tone in the Effusive and Expul

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sive Forms.

Repeat the above elements, words, and sentences with 1. Effusive Oral.

2. Expulsive Pure Tone.

3. Effusive Orotund.

4. Expulsive Oral.

5. Effusive Pure Tone.

6. Expulsive Orotund.

ORAL, EXPULSIVE FORM-WHEN USED.

The Oral in the Expulsive Form is appropriately employed in the expression of intense suffering, extreme weakness and exhaustion, and foppery and affectation.

EXAMPLE: EXHAUSTION.

Oral, Expulsive Form.

Wounded.

WILLIAM E. MILLER.

LET me lie down

Just here, in the shade of this cannon-torn tree,
Here, low on the trampled grass, where I may see
The surge of the combat, and where I may hear
The glad cry of victory, cheer upon cheer:

Let me lie down.

O, it was grand!

Like the tempest we charged, in the triumph to share;
The tempest,-its fury and thunder were there:

On, on, o'er intrenchments, o'er living and dead,
With the foe under foot, and our flag overhead:
O, it was grand!

Weary and faint,

Prone on the soldier's couch, ah, how can I rest,
With this shot-shatter'd head and saber-pierced breast?
Comrades, at roll-call when I shall be sought,
Say I fought till I fell, and fell where I fought,
Wounded and faint.

O, that last charge!

Right through the dread hell-fire of shrapnel and shell,
Through without faltering,-clear through with a yell!
Right in their midst, in the turmoil and gloom,
Like heroes we dash'd, at the mandate of doom!
O, that last charge!

It was duty!

Some things are worthless, and some others so good
That nations who buy them pay only in blood.
For Freedom and Country each man owes his part;
And here I pay my share, all warm from my heart:
It is duty!
Dying at last!

My mother, dear mother! with meek tearful eye,
Farewell! and God bless you, for ever and aye!
O that I now lay on your pillowing breast,
To breathe my last sigh on the bosom first prest!
Dying at last!

Great Heaven! this bullet-hole gapes like a grave;
A curse on the aim of the traitorous knave!

Is there never a one of you knows how to pray,
Or speak for a man as his life ebbs away?

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Our Father! our Father! why don't you proceed?

Can't you see I am dying?

Great God, how I bleed!
Ebbing away!

Ebbing away! The light of the day is turning to gray.

Our Father in Heaven,-boys, tell me the rest,

While I stanch the hot blood from this hole in my breast.

There's something about the forgiveness of sin;
Put that in! put that in and then
I'll follow your words and say an amen.
Here, Morris, old fellow, get hold of my hand,
And, Wilson, my comrade,-0! wasn't it grand
When they came down the hill like a thunder-charged

cloud, And were scattered like mist by our brave little crowd?

I am dying; bend down, till I touch you once more;
Don't forget me, old fellow: God prosper this war!
Confusion to enemies !-keep hold of my hand,-
And float our dear flag o'er a prosperous land !
Where's Wilson,-my comrade,-here, stoop down your

head;
Can't you say a short prayer for the dying and dead ?

QUESTIONS.
1. What is the topic of this lesson ?
2. Define the Oral, Expulsive Form.
3. When should it be used ?
4. Why does the selection require Oral Expulsive ?
5. Does it require Oral Expulsive throughout ?
6. Why is the Oral Explosive omitted ?

DIAGRAM OF ELEVENTH LESSON.

1. Exercises.....

Position.
Gesture.
Breathing.
Phonics.

2. Element-Quality.

3. Topic_Expulsive Oral.....

Definition.
Illustration.
Advantages.
How Acquired.
Class Exercise.
Principle.
Example

4. Selection. “Wounded."

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1. Up, comrades, up!
2. They sup full well.
3. The cup is full of poison.
4. Your apprehension must be dull.
5. That skull had a tongue in it once.

Aspirate. The Aspirate is that quality of voice in which the breath is sent forth from the organ in a whisper-tone with the resonance in the middle of the mouth.

Without command of the Aspirate Quality it is impossible to give appropriate expression to the emotions of fear, awe, horror, dread, amazement, and similar passions.

The Aspirate, when combined with Orotund, intensifies the utterance of deep solemnity, sublimity, adoration, and profound reverence.

It is in this combined form that the Aspirate will be of the greatest practical advantage to the general student.

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