The Gentleman's Magazine, 293. köide

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Bradbury, Evans, 1902

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Page 243 - Earth has not anything to show more fair : Dull would he be of soul who could pass by A sight so touching in its majesty: This City now doth, like a garment, wear The beauty of the morning; silent, bare, Ships, towers,, domes, theatres, and temples lie Open unto the fields, and to the sky; All bright and glittering in the smokeless air.
Page 237 - By numbers here from shame or censure free All crimes are safe, but hated poverty. This, only this, the rigid law pursues ; This, only this, provokes the snarling muse. The sober trader at a tatter'd cloak Wakes from his dream, and labours for a joke; With brisker air the silken courtiers gaze, And turn the varied taunt a thousand ways...
Page 154 - See, for that the LORD hath given you the sabbath, therefore he giveth you on the sixth day the bread of two days ; abide ye every man in his place, let no man go out of his place on the seventh day.
Page 503 - Place, the elevated residence of the then Mr Jeffrey. I proposed that we should set up a Review ; this was acceded to with acclamation. I was appointed editor, and remained long enough in Edinburgh to edit the first number of the Edinburgh Review. The motto I proposed for the Review was : 'Tenui musam meditamur avena" — We cultivate literature upon a little oatmeal.
Page 237 - Here let those reign, whom pensions can incite To vote a patriot black, a courtier white; Explain their country's dear-bought rights away...
Page 541 - All things that love the sun are out of doors; The sky rejoices in the morning's birth; The grass is bright with rain-drops;— on the moors The hare is running races in her mirth; And with her feet she from the plashy earth Raises a mist, that, glittering in the sun, Runs with her all the way, wherever she doth run.
Page 243 - A mighty mass of brick, and smoke, and shipping, Dirty and dusky, but as wide as eye Could reach, with here and there a sail just skipping In sight, then lost amidst the forestry Of masts; a wilderness of steeples peeping On tiptoe through their sea-coal canopy; A huge, dun cupola, like a foolscap crown On a fool's head - and there is London Town!
Page 94 - The oaks were shatter'd on the green , Woe was the hour — for never more That hapless Countess e'er was seen! And in that Manor now no more Is cheerful feast and sprightly ball; For ever since that dreary hour Have spirits haunted Cumnor Hall. The village maids, with fearful glance, Avoid the ancient moss-grown wall; Nor ever lead the merry dance Among the groves of Cumnor Hall. Full many a traveller oft hath sigh'd, And pensive wept the Countess' fall, As wand'ring onwards they've espied The haunted...
Page 230 - Methinks already from this chymic flame I see a city of more precious mould, Rich as the town which gives the Indies name, With silver paved and all divine with gold'.
Page 236 - For who would leave, unbrib'd, Hibernia's land? Or change the rocks of Scotland for the Strand? There none are swept by sudden fate away; But all, whom hunger spares, with age decay.

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