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THE FACTORY & WORKSHOP ACT,

1878.

RELATING TO

FACTORIES AND WORKSHOPS

WITH

Introduction and Explanatory Notes.

SECOND EDITION.
COMPRISING THE FACTORY AND WORKSHOP ACT, 1878, AND THE

ORDERS OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE MADE THEREUNDER.

BY

GEORGE JARVIS NOTCUTT,

SOLICITOR, FORMERLY OF THE MIDDLE TEMPLE, BARRISTER-AT-LAW.

Storage

7876

LONDON :

187
STEVENS AND SONS, 119, CHANCERY LANE,
Law Publishers and Booksellers.

1879.

319102 A 89

2052

CANCELLED

FROM BAKER LIBRARY

AUG 31 1984

LONDON:
STEVENS AND RICHARDSON, PRINTERS, 5, GREAT QUEEN STREET,

LINCOLN'S INN FIELDS, W.C.

ro

INTRODUCTION.

PRIOR to the passing of the Factory and Workshop Act, 1878, by the Factory Acts and the Workshop Acts were understood the laws which had been made, from time to time, for the purpose of regulating the employment of labour in the various branches of manufacturing industry. The former expression applied to the larger establishments known as factories, whilst the latter comprehended all those places where any handicraft work was carried on, on however small a scale, which did not come within any of the definitions of a “ factory” under the Factory Acts; these last-mentioned establishments being distinguished by the legislature by the term “workshop " (a). The expression “The Factory Acts, “ 1833 to 1874,” received a special definition, and comprised all the provisions of the statutes above referred to in force respecting factories, except 42 Geo. 3, c. 73, and 24 & 25 Vict. c. 117 (as to certain lace factories) (6). In like manner the expression “ The Workshop Acts, 1867 to 1871,” com

(a) The term "factory” originally meant either the establishment or building occupied by factors, who conducted trade in foreign or colonial parts, or the collective body of such factors, and did not receive its present popular meaning (that is, a manufactory, or place where large numbers are employed in carrying on some manufacture) until about the close of the last century; when, owing to the more extensive use of machinery in the manufacture of cotton and wool, establishments began to be erected in various parts of the United Kingdom of considerably larger dimensions, and involving the employment of far greater numbers of workpeople than had before been known. (6) 37 & 38 Vict. c. 44 (Factory Act, 1874), s. 1.

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