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SUBJUNCTIVE MOOD.

PRESENT TENSE.
Singular.

Plural
FIRST PERSON. If I do love. FIRST PERSON. If we do love.
SECOND PERSON. If thou dost love. Second Person. If ye or you do love.
THIRD PERSON. If he do or does Third Person. If they do love.

love.

IMPERFECT TENSE.

Singular.

Plural. FIRST Person. If I did love. FIRST PERSON. If we did love. Second Person. If thou didst love. Second Person. If ye or you did lovo. THIRD Person. If he did love. THIRD PERson. If they did love.

92. When a question is asked, the auxiliary verb precedes the nominative case; thus, Do I love ? Did John write ? May he go? Hade you learned the lesson ? "

93. The auxiliaries of the compound tenses are frequently used alone, to prevent the repetition of the verb; as, “He regards his word, but thou dost not (that is, dost not regard it).

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ways, &c.

ADVERBS. 94. Adverbs may be divided into the following classes :Of number ; as, Once, twice, thrice, &c. Of order; as, First, secondly, thirdly, fourthly, fifthly, lastly, finally, &e. Of place; as, Here, there, where, elsewhere, any where, somewhere,

nowhere, herein, whither, hither, thither, upward, downward, for

ward, backward, whence, hence, thence, whithersoever, &c. Of time present; as, Now, to-day,' &c. Of time pust; as, Already, before, lately, yesterday, heretofore, hither

to, long since, long ago, &c. Of time to come ; as, To-morrow, not yet, hereafter, henceforth, hence

forward, by and by, instantly, presently, immediately, straightOf time indefinite; as, Oft, often, ofttimes, oftentimes, sometimes,

soon, seldom, daily, weekly, monthly, yearly, always, when, then,

ever, never, again, &c. Of quantity; as, Much, little, sufficiently, how much, how great,

enough, abundantly, &c. Of manner or quality ; as, Wisely, foolishly, justly, unjustly, quickly,

slowly, &c. Of doubt; as, Perhaps, peradventure, possibly, perchance, &c. Of affirmation ; as, Verily, truly, undoubtedly, doubtless, certainly,

yea, yes, surely, indeed, really, &c. Of negation; as, Nay, no, not, by no means, not at all, in no wise, &c. Of interrogation; as, How, why, wherefore, whither, &c. Of comparison; as, More, most, better, best, worse, worst, less, least,

very, almost, little, alike, &c. There are many adverbs, however, not included in the above list.

END OF PART I.

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R. G. PARKER, A. M.
PRINCIPAL OF THE FRANKLIN GRAMMAR SCHOOL, AUTHOR OF

PROGRESSIVE EXERCISES IN ENGLISH COMPOSITION,"

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AND

CHARLES FOX, A. M.

PRINCIPAL OF THE BOYLSTON GRAMMAR SCHOOL.

" Breve est iter per exempla."

Fifth Edition.

BOSTON:
PUBLIS HEI) BY CROCKER & BREWSTER,

47 Washington Street,
NEW YORK: LEAVITT, LORD & CO.,

182 Broadway.

1841.

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1835,

BY CROCKER & BREWSTER,
In the Clerk s Office of the District Court of Massachusetts.

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From the Records of the School Committee.

City of Boston, December 16, 1834. VOTED, That Messrs. Parker and Fox's Progressive Exercises in English Grammar be introduced into all the Public Grammar Schools of this city, after the present date.

STEREOTYPED AT THE
BOSTON TYPE AND STEREOTYPE FOUNDRY.

PREFACE.

In the former part of this Grammar, the principles of Analysis, or English Parsing, were unfolded, and the pupil was led, by progressive steps, to a knowledge of the parts of speech, with their various relations and dependencies. This volume contains the application of these principles in the Synthesis or Construction of English sentences. It is to be premised, that, in the arrangement of these principles, the authors have considered the usage of the best writers as their only standard of grammatical accuracy. For this reason, it will be seen in this work, that many expressions are condemned, which are sometimes used by popular writers, and are of frequent occurrence in colloquial intercourse. The propriety of this must be evident to all who consider that language aims at a higher object than the bare expression of animal wants. It has been asserted by a celebrated writer, that most of the disputes which have agitated the world, have arisen from a reciprocal misunderstanding of terms. How important, then, is a logical precision in the construction of sentences ! In the decisions which the authors have made in relation to grammatical propriety, they have not ventured to

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array their own authority against common usage ; but they have deduced certain rules from higher sources, from which there is no appeal; and, having ascertained the principles upon which English Syntax is founded, they have endeavored to make their Synthesis conform to them.

Boston, August, 1835.

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