Page images
PDF
EPUB

a cause, there arise any breach of friendship, human weakness is discovered then in a mortifying light. In matters of serious moment, the sentiments of the best and worthiest might vary from that of their friends, according as their lines of life diverge, or as their temper, and habits of thought, presents objects under different points of view. But with candid and liberal minds, unity of affection still will be pre. served. Desires and wishes are the first spring of action. When they become exorbitant, the whole of the character is like to be tainted. If we should suffer our fancies to create to themselves worlds of ideal happiness; if we should feed our imagination with plans of opulence and of splendor; if we should fix to our wishes certain stages of a high advancement, or certain degrees of an uncommon reputation, as the sole station of our felicity; the assured consequence shall be, that we will become unhappy under our present state ; that we shall be unfit for acting the part, and for discharging the duties that belong to it; and we shall discompose the peace and order of our minds, and shali foment many hurtful passions. Maria always appears amiably. She never speaks severe or contemptuous.*

*“In determining whether an adjective or an adverb ought to be used, it is necessary to ascertain whether, in the case in question, quality, or manner, is indicated : in the former case, an adjective is proper; in the latter, an adverb. A number of examples will illustrate this direction, and prove useful on other occasions.

“She looks cold; she looks coldly on him. He feels warm; he feels warmly the insult offered to him. He became sincere and virtuous; he became sincerely virtuous.-She lives free from care ; he lives freely at another's expense.-Harriet always appears neat; she dresses neatly.-Charles has grown great by his wisdom; he has grown greatly in reputation.—They now appear happy; they now appear happily in earnest.--The statement seems exact; the statement seems exactly in point.”

“ The verb to be, in all its moods and tenses, generally requires the word immediately connected with it to be an adjective, not an adverb; and, consequently, when this verb can be substituted for any other, without varying the sense or the construction, that other verb must also be connected with an adjective. The following sentences elucidate these observations: This is agreeable to our interest : That behavior was not suitable to his station: Rules should be conformable to is

is sense : ' "The rose smells sweet : How sweet the hay smells ! How delightful the

is country appears! How pleasant the fields look! The clouds look dark! How black is

is the sky looked! The apple tastes sour: How bitter the plums tasted! He feels happy. In all these sentences, we can, with perfect propriety, substitute some tenses of the verb to be for the other verbs. But in the following sentences, we cannot do this : 'The dog smells disagreeably: George feels exquisitely: How pleasantly she looks at us!?"

The above extract is from Murray's Exercises, from which all of the promiscuous examples have likewise been taken.

are

are

was

were

END OF PART II.

ADVERTISEMENT.

The Third Part of this Grammar, containing PROSODY, will shortly be published. The plan of the authors will then be completed. Part I. contains the ANALYSIS, Part II. the Synthesis, and Part III. will contain the PROSODY of the English Language. It will be found, however, that Parts I. and II. contain all that is usually taught in common schools.

[blocks in formation]

RICHARD GREEN PARKER, A. M. PRINCIPAL OF THE JOHNSON GRAMMAR SCHOOL, BOSTON; AUTHOR

OF PROGRESSIVE EXERCISES IN ENGLISH COMPOSITION,
EXERCISES IN RHETORICAL READING, THE BOSTON
SCHOOL COMPENDIUM OF NATURAL AND

EXPERIMENTAL PHILOSOPHY;

AND

CHARLES FOX, A. M.
PRINCIPAL OF THE BOYLSTON GRAMMAR SCÀOOL, Boston.

Breve est iter per exempla."

BOSTON:
PUBLISHED BY CROCKER & BREWSTER,

No. 47, Washington Street.

1840.

Entered according to an Act of Congress, in the year 1840.

BY CROCKER & BREWSTER, In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of Massachusetts.

PREFACE.

This Third Part of the Progressive Exercises in English Grammar completes the original design of the authors, to present a comprehensive treatise on the subject, adapted to the school room, and sufficient to supply the wants of teachers and pupils of every grade.

Part First contains the Analysis ; Part Second, the Synthesis ; and this, Third Part, comprises the Rules of Orthography and Punctuation, the Principles of Etymology, and the Prosody of the English Language. The whole work is now before the public, and the authors believe that they have omitted no principle strictly grammatical, which is necessary, in order to teach the pupil to speak properly and to write correctly. This volume is enriched by a copious list of abbreviations in general use, an explanation of the terms used in connexion with written language, and a particular description of the marks used by printers and others for the correction of the press.

An Appendix is also given, which embraces some of the elementary principles of Rhetoric and Logic, intimately connected with the subject of Grammar.

A general Index to the Three Parts will be found at the close of this' volume to adapt it to the purposes of reference.

In conclusion the authors beg leave to say, that if they are not deceived in the result of their labors, this treatise on English Grammar will recommend itself to teachers and pupils by the following features :

1. “ It is simple, and therefore easily understood ; and it introduces the pupil by easy steps to a knowledge of the rules of Syntax, illustrating each with examples that assist the comprehension of the learner and lighten the labor of the teacher."

2. Many useless technicalities are omitted, which frequently perplex the pupil without adding to his store of knowledge.

3. Every principle is illustrated by copious examples, which render the treatise highly practical, as well as theoretical.

4. The principles of syntax are all embraced in a few short rules, without “ notes,"

exceptions

or " appendages."

5. The subject of parsing, or the analysis of sentences, is presented by itself in a separate volume; so that the learner who has neither leisure nor opportunity to pursue the other departments of the subject need not be encumbered by a large book.

6. The definitions, explanations and illustrations, as well as the principles themselves, are expressed in familiar terms, and that too without the sacrifice of precision. This feature if it renders the treatise less philosophical, makes it more intelligible.

7. It is enriched by the addition of a copious list of abbreviations in general use, and an explanation of the terms used in written language, together with a description of the marks used for the correction of the press.

8. The unity of the subject, throughout the three parts, is strictly preserved.

9. While the whole treatise has been prepared expressly for the school room, the general Index at the end of this volume renders the work valuable as a book of refer

ence.

« EelmineJätka »