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creature of a day, though he offended the im... Creator of all. One, for an oath that gave his worldly profit; another, for a lie that brought hin real advantage; another, for sabbath breaking gave him even no present happiness, parted with eternal inheritance, everlasting life, the crown of gh and the bliss of heaven, and bought the condemnal. of God, the misery of never-ending despair, and torments of hell. O let the sinner talk no more of worldly interests suffering by religion. Every interes for time and eternity suffers by irreligion; and it us calls for faith in God's word to make us utterly ashame of all such objections.

Another objection commonly made against a practi cal obedience to the word is this--I CANNOT ATTEN? TO IT AT THE PRESENT TIME. Just very busy, I have many other things to think of, it would be so unse

seasonable, that I cannot now thisk of religion : a time will come when I may have more leisure.' The answer to all the soleinn truths heard is, like that of Felix to Paul, Go thy way for this time; when I have a convenient season, I will call for thee. But yon forget that the present is the only season you really havenow is the accepted time. Can you insure a future time? you cannot ! Can

you

be certain that if you neglect your eternal interests now, God will here. after give you his grace ? Oh, no! you forget that if the soul be lost, it is an irremediable loss; there is no future ransom.

By nature you will never have any other feeling than your present feeling of procrastination and delay; and if you trifle with God's present message

of mercy, under such a pretext, you make his very mercy, the reason for insulting him the more.

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ay, thoa nd it not be just then, if he never sends agaiu to you,

1)ae, ter a crever again gives you the disposition to close with pacher, Áricious invitations ? What if the Gospel should never ther, Ár sure be sounded in

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ears!

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you should never prek bain be inclined to turn to God, but given up to a everlastya örldly heart!

Look at the state of mind of one ed, and be vakened to a sense of his true condition in a dying * f Jur! What would he not give for your present season les the sigarai repentance and attention to eternal interests! s3 by rken

Whatever be your occupations, he would think them all Fers baumiaf inexpressibly little importance, compared with the rd to make a salvation of his soul. How gladly would he part with

all those riches, and pleasures, and honours, for the sake palu mak #of which he neglected his soul, rather than hazard his this-dar everlasting welfare! Or, supposing a man to be so TING. Jo stupified, or hardened through sin, as to have no such er thingsnt views, will he be equally indifferent in the day of judgat I can ment, or when enduring the wrath of God iv endless when I min ruin? You cannot put off that day; you cannot defer solemn

that ruin! Almighty power girds you in; there is no - hy way to escaping the reach of his omnipotent arm !. O think how

the recollection of your present indecision, or rather, of your real rejection of the truth, will aggravate the irretrievable woe which you endure to the keenest degree of anguish. Think, patiently and seriously consider, that the loss of the soul is utterly irreparable, and can only be secured in the present moment, while God gives you the season of salvation, and surely you will be roused, and cease to trifle.

But it is again objected, I shall be COUNTED POOLISH, AND INCUR SOME ODIOUS NAMZ. Allow this in its fullest extent; but will you be really foolish to escape merely the imputation of folly? The fear of

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the Lord, that is wisdom; and to depart from evil, is understanding, Job xxviii, 28. The world is ready indeed to think that they mainly are guilty of folly who are in earnest in religion. But one would think, when the case was plainly stated, that no one could hesitate in admitting the extreme folly of neglecting our eternal happiness. Men of the world can at once tell the difference in property between a hundred pence to be received and spent in some wasteful pleasure to-day, in the place of an inheritance. worth thousands a year, certainly to be received and enjoyed on the morrow, and would count him mad who would grasp at the present pence and part with all his title to the inheritance, which he was the next day to enjoy for a perpetuity. But this folly is incomparably less than that of every worldly man. O that such men were wise, to calculate the difference between the sixty or seventy years of this uncertuin and transitory life, and the more than millions, or hundreds of millions of years, that will certainly and abidingly succeed! How great is the folly of sinful man ! At death there is nothing that he will not give for his salvation ; while during his whole life he hardly ever seriously thinks of it. He will do nothing, when he might gain every thing; he wishes to do all, when it is too late to do any thing. What an illusion is bere! What an infatuation! Is not this genuine folly? 0 be not afraid of the reproach then of man. All the servants of God now in glory have endured it. Moses counted the reproach of Christ greater riches than the treasures of Egypt. Be assured that there is real happiness in being reviled for his name's sake; If ye be reproached for the name of Christ, happy are ye; for the spirit of glory and of God resteth upon you. 1 Pet.

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iv, 14. It is a cheering token of our interest in him, and in his eternal reward !

Others object, I HATE HYPOCRISY ; MANY THAT PROFESS RELIGION ARE HYPOCRITES. You do right to hate hypocrisy; our Lord pronounces a woe upon all hypocrites. But what if, in your present state, you yourself are a hypocrite ? you profess to be a Christian, and yet live to the world ; that is hypocrisy. You profess to think real religion of value, and yet for fear of

• It has ever been the custom of those who are too prejudiced, or too ignorant, or too indolent to enter into the real merits of an opinion, to give the person holding it some odious name, and so condemn it without the difficulty of confutation. In this way the Heathen endeavoured to put down Christianity at first; and the remarks of Justin Martyr, in his Apology written in the second century, are very applicable to names now given to Christians in the nineteenth.

“ As for our name, which is tantamount to a crime against a Christian, if we are tried upon that article, we must certainly be acquitted as very good men: but as we should deem it unreasonable when convicted of real'orimes to plead a bare name only in arrest; so, on the other side, if both with respect to our name and the nature of our polity, we are found altogether innocent, it is at your door to take care, lest by unjustly punishing a people convicted of no evil, you yourselves deservedly smart for such injustice. Praise and punishment, then, cannot with reason be charged on a mere name, unless there be actions good or bad to justify the charge. But it is very notorious that when any of your own religion are brought to trial, you never punish them before you convict them; but when a Christian is indicted, you snatch at the shadow of his name for a substantial crime; whereas would you give yourselves leave to consider that name, you would find it more becoming to animadvert upon the accusers thau the accused; for we are indicted by the name of Christians, but now xpnsos is a word for kind, or good, and such a word cannot be a just foundation for hatred. Again, if any of the accused retraci ihe name of Christian, you take him presently at his word, and acquit him as having nothing more criminal to charge against him; but he who has the courage to stick to the profession of his name, is certain to suffer for so doing; when the life of the professor and the non-professor both ought to be the subject of your enquiry, that the merits of both might be manifested by their actions."

the Lord, that is wisdom; and to depart from evil, is understanding. Job xxviii, 28. The world is ready indeed to think that they mainly are guilty of folly who are in earnest in religion. But one would think, when the case was plainly stated, that no one could hesitate in admitting the extreme folly of neglecting our eternal happiness. Men of the world can at once tell the difference in property between a hundred pence to be received and spent in some wasteful pleasure to-day, in the place of an inheritance worth thousands a year, certainly to be received and enjoyed on the morrow, and would count him mad who would grasp at the present pence and part with all his title to the inheritance, which he was the next day to enjoy for a perpetuity. But this folly is incomparably less than that of every worldly man. O that such men were wise, to calculate the difference between the sixty or seventy years of this uncertuin and transitory life, and the more than millions, or hundreds of millions of years, that will certainly and abidingly succeed! How great is the folly of sinful

At death there is nothing that he will not give for his salvation ; while during his whole life he hardly ever seriously thinks of it. He will do nothing, when he might gain every thing; he wishes to do all, when it is too late to do any thing. What an illusion is bere ! What an infatuation! Is not this genuine folly ? O be not afraid of the reproach then of man. All the servants of God now in glory have endured it. Moses counted the reproach of Christ greater riches than the treasures of Egypt. Be assured that there is real happiness in being reviled for his name's sake; If ye be reproached for the name of Christ, happy are ye; for the spirit of glory and of God resteth upon you. 1 Pet.

man !

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