The Dramatic Works of Baron Kotzebue, 1. köide

Front Cover
Charles Smith, no. 52 Maiden-Lane, and Stephen Stephens, no. 165 Pearl-Street., 1800
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 33 - Go, wiser thou ! and, in thy scale of sense Weigh thy opinion against Providence ; Call imperfection what thou fanciest such, Say, 'Here he gives too little, there too much...
Page 33 - What nothing earthly gives, or can destroy, The soul's calm sunshine, and the heart-felt joy, Is virtue's prize: A better would you fix?
Page 69 - Cf. 47.] 8° [p. ii] t. adv., pp. iii-x "Life of Kotzebue by himself," pp. 9-104. 2 frontispieces [Kotzebue, Hodgkinson.] 68. [Kotzebue, AFF von.] The Wild Youth: a comedy for digestion. In three acts. Translated from the German of Kotzebue, by Charles Smith. New- York: printed for Charles Smith and S. Stephens. 1800. 8°. pp. 74. A translation (by Charles Smith, New York) of: Der Wildfang, Lustspiel in 3 Akten. Leipzig. 1798. 69. [Spiess, CH] The Mountain Cottager; or, Wonder upon Wonder. A tale....
Page 28 - ... the heathens — my daughter dead to me, and I to her. But this morning — (Oh ! why have I survived it ?) — but this fatal morning I was released from bondage by your son. I came, and found your daughter. in the arms of her brother.
Page 24 - Certainly none to me ! To Poland, to my struggling country, I sacrificed my wealth as I would have sacrificed my life, if she had required it. My country is no more; and we are wanderers on a burdened earth, finding no refuge but in the hearts of the humane and virtuous.
Page 20 - One question more. You spoke of your grandfather, who went to Palestine. (With tremulous utterance} Have you then still — a grandmother ? Wil. No. She has long been dead. Hu. (Trembles, and slowly repeats the words] Has long been dead / (Aside, sorrowfully] Margaretta .' (Endeavours to compose himself] Dear children, I am faint and weary. Dare I beg a crust of bread, and a cup of wine ? \ Both. Directly! (They are running to the castle. Hu. And if your father would allow me a night's lodging in...
Page 19 - ... the hill, which rises opposite to the Castle. Hu. Ha! There it is! There is Wulfingen ! — Hail, castle of my fathers ! Hail, ye moss grown towers ! In blooming manhood I forsook you. In drooping age I now again behold you. I left these gates, accompanied by a hundred valiant warriors : the swords of the Saracens have slain them, and I return alone. (Descends the hill, and, for afew moments, surveys the castle with violent emotion.) All is as I left it. No stone is broken : no tree is fallen....
Page 34 - ... Wulfingen, wishing to revenge his father's death, and enraged in a just cause, struck a lay-brother of the Benedictines, was subjected to the ban, excommunicated, and died in misery. Well can I recollet the grief of my poor mother ! But of that no more. I myself, my son, I myself have completed the number of unhappy beings, whom superstition has plunged into destruction. I am not ashamed to tell thee, that, for one moment, I have been a villain— and what man is without such moments ? One only...
Page 48 - Ade. (recovering} Ah ! Repeat that name ! — Give me life again — Declare once more i am your daughter. (BERTRAM silently raises her.) (Seizes his hand hastily) Come hither, father ! It was false. Was it not ? — That Monk is full of poison. Poisonous wicked lies ! — Were they not, my father ? (BERTRAM is silent.) You do not answer. Perhaps you do not understand my words — He has dared to say that I am not your daughter — and I love you so tenderly ! (BERTRAM atempts to speak, but cannot.)...
Page 33 - I summon as witnesses ot truth. Strike me with icy dumbness, and spit sharp venom on me, if this last branch receive destructive doctrines from me (kneels down) And thou, eternal being, whom I worship, take from me the bitterness of this hour, and let it overtake me on my death-bed! Praise be unto thee that I have found...

Bibliographic information