Page images
PDF
EPUB

but the son of a citizen naturalized during the A NATURALIZED CITIZEN must have the same son's minority, he must also produce proof of his qualifications as to residence in the State and father's naturalization, of which the naturaliza- district, assessment and payment of taxes, as a tion certificate will be the best evidence.

native-born citizen. He must have been natuA NATURAL-BORN CITIZEN over twenty-two ralized one month before the election. If his years of age must have paid within two years a name is not on the registry list, he must prove State or county tax, which shall have been as- his residence by the testimony of a citizen of sessed at least two months and paid one month the district or division, and himself state by before the election. He must have resided in affidavit when and where and by what court he the State one year, or if, having previously been was naturalized, and produce his naturalization a qualified elector or native-born citizen of the certificate for examination, On challenge, he State, he shall have removed therefrom and re- may be also required, even when his name is turned, then six months immediately preceding upon the registry list, to produce a naturalization the election. He must have resided in the elec- certificate, unless he has been for five years contion district where he offers to vote at least two secutively a voter in the district. months immediately preceding the election. If his name is not upon the registry list, he must produce at least one qualified voter of the district

QUALIFICATIONS OF ELECTION OFFICERS. or division to prove his residence by affidavit, No person can be an clection officer who holds, and himself make afhdavit to the facts upon or within two months has held, any office or apwhich he claims a right to vote, also that he has pointment under the Federal or State governnot moved into the district for the purpose of ment, or under any city or county, or any muvoting therein. Proof of payment of taxes must nicipal board, commission or trust in any city, be made by producing the tax receipt, or by except justices of the peace, aldermen, notaries affidavit that it has been lost, destroyed or was public and persons in the military service of the never received.

State.

[blocks in formation]

1699

Barbadoes distemper.. 1730 Smallpox 1741

Palatine distemper.. 1746

Putrid sore throat.. 1747 Malignant fever.... 1754

Palatine fever 1756 Smallpox 1762 Yellow fever.. 1773 Smallpox 1776-7 Smallpox and camp fever. 1793

Yellow fever.... 1794 1795 1796 1797 1798 1799 1802 1803

[blocks in formation]
[ocr errors]

66

16.6

16,500

36.2 243 61.15 10.9

[ocr errors]

76,0001

[ocr errors]

185

125

300
2,500
5,000

800*
800*

800*
1,292
3,645
1,015
835
199
943
20
83
485
100t
935
1,012

427
128

758
1,199

524
624
799

956
4,464

.93

1,000 2,314 2,884

1819
1820
1823-4 Smallpox
1827
1832 Asiatic cholera
1849
1852 Smallpox
1853 Yellow fever..
1861 Smallpox
1861 Scarlet fever....
1865 Smallpox
1865 Scarlet fever...
1869
1870
1871-2 Smallpox..

89,630 106,000 110,677 139,774 145,000 161,9801 385,600 451,276 472,377 576,378

6.29 14.2 7.49

11.6

.14

.60 3.48

.62 5.77 2.66

.94 .27 1.31 2.06

.84 I. 1. 20 1.27

170

.35

620,874

663,173 674,022 684,871

6.51

• These figures are upon authority of Dr. Mease, who said in 1811 that during the years 1794-6 the yellow fever was nearly as bad as in 1802, when the deaths were 835. + The deaths froin Board of Health report cases according to estimate.

The higures given are the estimate of persons who remained in the city during the entire contagion. Large numbers of citizens fled from the pestilence.

!

Eighth Month,]

AUGUST

(1880.

MOON'S PHASES, Philadelphia.
d. h. m.

d. k. 7.
New Moon... 5 10 48 P.M. O Full Moon.... 20 O 18 A.M.
First Quarterı3 7 42 A.M. (Last Quarter27 11 14 A.M.

| Day of the Year.

Day of the Month. | Day of the Week.

PHENOMENA.

[ocr errors]

210 3

6 44! 7

W

[ocr errors]

uuuu

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

316.2

8 to 45

[ocr errors]

233 20 F

5 15

[blocks in formation]

THE SUN, THE MOON,

THE TIDES,
Philadelphia. Philadelphia.

Philadelphia.
Rises Souths Sets Rises. Souths' Sets. Bigb Tide.

Low Tide.

(Apo., id, oh.M. A.M.P.M. P.M.A.M. A.M. P.M. A.M.P.M.A.M. P.M. (Per., 17d. 7h.A.M.

h.m. m. $.h.m. h. m. h. in. . m.d. h. m. h. m h. w. h. m. 51 (Apo., 29d. 4h.A.M. 214 IS

4 596
27 13

46 8 29 4 12 25 9 58 10 271 4 47 5 175.4 4.00 P.N. 0 H.
2151 2 M 5 0 5 58 7 12 I 37 9 19 4 57 26 10 57 11 25 5 46 6 16 5.6 7:33 P.M. sets,
Tu
Il 5 53 7 11 2 33 10 8 5 36 27 11 50

9 5.8 11.55 P.M. Ant. sets.
217 4
5 2 5 47 7 10 3 32 10 55 6 TO 28

O 15 o 37
34 7 56 6.0

9.37 P.m. Vega S.
Th
5 3 5 41 7 9 4 33 11 42

6 41 291
o 58 I 18 8 8

37

6.2 3.00 A.M. O O O inf. 219 6 F

5 4
5 35 7 8
5 35 0271 7 9 -

1 36 1 56 8 55 9 15 6.3 6.00 A.M. OVO.
220
7 S

5 4 5 28 7 6 6 371 1 11 7 35 I 2 15 2 351 9 34 9 54 6.4 8.16 P.M. dsets. 221 88 5 5 5 20 7 5 7 40 1 551 8 1 2 2 54 3 14 10 13 10 33 6.5 7:46 A. M. Ở 3 (. 222

9 M

5 6 5 II 7 4 8 44! 2 40 8 27 3 3 33 3 53 10 52 11 12 6.5 7.59 P.M. H sets, 223 10 Tu 5

75 27 3 9 49 3 26 8 55 4 4 13 4 36 11 32 11 55 6.5 2.00 A.M. h stat. 224 11 W 8 4 53 7 11o 57 4 161 9 27 4 57 5 20

0 16 6.4 10.47 P.M. 7* rise. 225 12 Th 5 9 4 43 7 0

6
5 9 10 5 5 44 6 9 39

9.22 P.11. 4 rises.
226
13
F
5 10 4 32 6 59 I 16 6

5 10 50 7 36 7 6 1 28 I 55 5.9 9.15 P.M. Spi. sets. 227 14 S 15 II 4 21 6 57 2 25 7

5 11 45

2

38 8 141 2 25 2 57 5.6 9.44 P.N. h rises, 228 15 8 5 12 4 9.656 327 8 7 A.M.

9

8 52 9 31 3 33 4 II 5.3 2.00 A.M. stat. 229 16 M 5 13 3 57 6 55 4 22 9

O 49 10 10

4 50 5 27 5.4 7:42 P.M. 9 sets. 230 17 Tu 5 14 3 44 6 53 5 9 10 8

2 om II 19 11 506 4 6 38 5.7 4.00 A.M. stat. 231 18 W 5 15 3 30 6 52 5 48 11 4

3 13 12

O 19 7 9 7 38 5.9 9.54 P.M. Altair S. 232 19 Th 5 16 3 16 6 51 6 21 11 57 4 29 13 O45 8 8 4 8 27 6.1 7.46 P.M. dsets.

5 17 3 2 6 49 6 51 A.M. 5 42 14 I 30 I 51 8 49 9 10 6.3 0.00 P.M. OHO. 234 21 S

2 47 6 48 1 7 20 O 47 6 52 15 2 13 2 35 9 32 9 54 6.4 3.59 A.M. rises. 235 22 S

5 19 2 32 6 46 7 47 I 35 8 0 16 2 56 3 18 10 15 10 37 6.5 0.00 A.M. gr. el. W. 2,0 23 M 2 16 6 45

2 22 9 617 3 37 358 10 56 11 17 6.5 11.45 P.M. Ó 4 0. 237 24 Tu 5 21 2

06 43

8 46 3 8 10 II 18 4 18 4 40 11 37 11 59 6.5 5.58 PM. Óhe.
238 25 W
5 22 I 44

6
42
3 56 11 14 19

5 24 o 21 6.3 10.05 P.M. OC. 239 26 Th 5 23 1 27

6
40
4 44 O 14.20
5 46 6 8

1

9.34 P.M. rises,
5 24
I 10 6 39 10 41 5 33 I 1221 6 32 6 56

1 27
I 51 6.0

8.23 P.M. 4 rises.
5 25 o 526 371 11 30 6 22 2 4 22

7 22 7 51

2 41 5.8 8.14 P.M. Pomal. rises. 242 29 S o 34 6 36 A.M. 7 12

2 52 23 8 23 8 54 3 10 3 42 5.5 6.00 P.M. 8 in Per. 243 30 M 15 26 o 16 6 34 0 24 8 1

3 33 24 9 25 9 53 4 13 4 44 5.3 10.51 P.M. Aldeb. rises 244 zi Tu 5 27 A.M. 36 33|| 1 21 8 49 4 10 251110 2110 50! 5 12 5 40 5.5 1 8.36 P.M. h rises. AUGUST.

Never do an act of which you doubt the just(9) Venus Evening Star during this month.

ice or propriety. (0) Mercury rises about one hour and a half As threshing separates the corn from the chaff, before the Sun on the 21st.

so does affliction purify virtue.

It is easy in adversity to despise death; he has Mr. Neison concludes, from his study of Jupi

real fortitude who dares to live and be wretched. ter, that an extended atmosphere for it of any Advise well before you begin; and when you substance known to science is a physical im- have maturely considered, then act with promptpossibility.

itude,
Dr. Schmidt of Athens, in his final map of Nothing can occur beyond the strength of
the moon, which is on a scale of six feet to the faith to sustain, or transcending the resources
moon's diameter, makes its surface better known of religion to relieve.
than many parts of our own globe.

WHATEVER natural right men have to freedom
Tue gold medal of the Royal Astronomical and independency, it is manifest that some men
Society of Great Britain has been presented to have a natural ascendency over others.
Prof. Hall, of the Washington Observatory, for It may be remarked, for the comfort of honest
his discovery of the satellites of Mars.

poverty, that avarice reigns most in those who Prof. Hall, from the motion of the satellites have but few good qualities to recommend them. of Mars, which he discovered in 1877, has made This is a weed that will grow in a barren soil. an accurate coniputation of its mass, and finds it It is not work that kills men, it is worry. to be about one-third-millionth of the mass of the Work is healthy; you can hardly put more sun, not differing much from the values obiain- upon a man than he can bear. Worry is rust ed by Leverrier, and by Hansen and Olsussen upon the blade.

It is not the revolution that of Sweden, being nearly a mean between the destroys the machinery, but the friction. Fear two.

secretes acids, but love and trust are sweet juices.

240 27 F 241 28 S

2 15

5 26

PHILADELPHIA CHRONOLOGY December 26. British steamship Boadicea, FOR 1878-9.

of the new Mediterranean line, arrived after a

voyage of 45 days from Messina, Italy. This 1878, November 24. Main audience-room of was the first vessel that sailed from Europe on Messiah M. E. church, Moyamensing av. and this line, but was the second to reach here. Morris st., dedicated.

December 30. Meeting of citizens of TwentyNovember 25. First annual meeting of the third Ward, formerly of the townships of Byberry Philadelphia Society for Organizing Charitable and Moreland, at which it was resolved to petition Relief and Suppressing Mendicancy, at Associ- the Legislature to separate that territory from ation Hall

the city of Philadelphia and annex it to Bucks December 1, Norris Square M. E, church, county. Mascher st. above Susquehanna av., dedicated. 1879, January 1. A new department for the

December 5: Iron steamship State of Cali- out-door sick opened in the Pennsylvania Hosfornia, built for the Pacific Coast Steamship pital on Spruce st. below Ninth. Company, launched from the shipyard of Wil- January 2. Isaac R. Muloch, formerly clerk liam Cramp & Son.

in the Water Department, convicted of embezzleDecember 8. First free breakfast of the Phil. ment. adelphia Sunday Breakfast Association given at First business-day upon which the banks of the corner of Eleventh and Wood sts.

Philadelphia resumed specie payments, in comDecember 10. Steamship Emily B. Souder of pliance with the Resumption act. There was Philadelphia, on the New York and San Domingo but a very moderate demand for gold, most cusline, foundered at sea. Passengers and crew, tomers of the banks preferring greenbacks or numbering 43, lost.

gold certificates. December 1. Offices of Department of High- January 3. A very cold day. Thermometer ways removed from Sixth and Chestnut sts., and stood in the early morning at from 4° below zero opened in the new Public Building, Broad st. 10 30 to 50 above in various parts of the city.

December 12. John R. Nagle and George M. January 4. St. Philip's P. E. Church, reVickers, charged with embezzlement of the prop. moved from Vine above Seventh, opened for the erty of the Market Street Passenger Railway first time in the Advocate Church - building, Company, were acquitted.

Spring Garden st. below Broad. The congregaDecember 15.

New Moravian congregation tion of the latter was dissolved. organized and services opened at Forrest Man- January 5. The P. E. Church of the Redeemer, sion, Broad and Master sts.

for seamen, north-west corner of Front and December 16. Chapel of the R. E. Church Queen sts., consecrated. of the Reconciliation, Tasker and Thirteenth New chapel of St. Sauveur P. E. Church sts., dedicated.

(French), Eighteenth st. above Chestnut, dediDecember 17 Greenbacks were on a par with cated. gold coin and the premium upon gold ceased for January 6. Night-school for artisans opened the first time since December 30, 1861, when the at Boys' Central High School, and night schools banks suspended specie payments. The highest for men and women in various parts of the city. point reached by the gold premium was $2.85, on Octavius V. Catto school for colored chil. July 11, 1864.

dren, Lombard st. above Twentieth, formally - John S. Morton, formerly president, and opened. Samuel P. Huhn, formerly treasurer, of the January 6 and 7. Largest sheriff's sale of real Market Street Passenger Railway Company, esiate ever known in Philadelphia. Nearly 700 who pleaded guilty, February 14, 1878, to fraud- properties were levied upon and advertised to be ulently issuing stock of that company, were sen- sold, and two days were for the first time occutenced to pay a nominal fine, the costs of trial, pied by the monthly sheriff's sales. and to undergo ten years' imprisonment, from January 8. Arrival of the steamship Stadt February 14.

Amsterdam, Cape. Sleuter, the pioneer vessel of December 18. Isaac K. Creamer, formerly the new stcamship line between Philadelphia and clerk in the Water Department, tried for forgery Amsterdam. in the books of the department to cover up an ab- January 9. Steamship Saratoga, altered for straction of the public money, was found guilty. the purposes of a Russian war-corvette, to be

December 20. Robert P. King, Jr., late clerk called the Africa, sailed, under clcarance for in Water Department, charged with embezzle- Sitka, Alaska. ment of the moneys of the city, was found guilty. January 10. Benjamin Hunter, convicted of

December 21. John Fields, charged with the the murder of John M. Armstrong of Philadelmurder of Herman Meizlitz, October 6, 1878, at phia, January 23, 1878, hanged at Camden, N. J. Oxford and Warnock sts., was found guilty of January 15, United States Centennial Commurder in the second degree, and sentenced to an mission met for the last time at the Continental imprisonment of 10 years ir months and 20 days. | Hotel, and received and adopted the final report

Steamships State of California and Colum- of the committee on finance and accounts. bus, altered for the purpose of making them Meeting of the depositors of the Franklin Russian cruisers, sailed finally from Cramp's Saving Fund, bankrupt Assignees' report preshipyard, under American colors and clearance. sented and dividend of five per cent. 'declared At sea the American flag was hauled down and to the creditors, making altogether about fifteen the vessels transferred to officers of the Rus per cent. paid up to that date. sian government, who were on board of them January 18. The steamship Vindicator, of with their crews. The name of the vessel first the Philadelphia, New York and Fall River mentioned was changed to the Europe, and of Navigation (Clyde) line, which had gone ashore the second to Asia. The Asia arrived at Cher. on the coast of Long Island, January 4, became a bourg, France, January 4, 1879.

total wreck.

(1880.

Ninth Month,]

SEPTEMBER. MOON'S PHASES, Philadelphia. d. k. m.

d. . m.
New Moon... 4 II 52 A.M.

Full Moon ....18 10 28 A.M.
D First Quarterit

( Last Quarter26 6 8 A.M.

I 24 P.M.

Day of the Year.
Day of the Month
Day of the Week.

PHENOMENA.

[ocr errors]

A.M.

lleicht

Jeet.

5 30

0 26

7 45 8

248

1 59

8 49 5

[ocr errors]

254 10 F

2 18

4 20

7 145.8

[ocr errors]

6 48 15

2

[merged small][ocr errors][merged small]

THE SUN, THE MOON,

THE TIDES,
Philadelphia Philadelphia.

Philadelphia.
Rises Souths Sets Rises. Souths Sets.

Higb Tide.
Low Tide.

Per., 13d. sh. A.M.
A.M.A.M. P.M. A.M.A.M. P.M.

P.M. A.M.P.M.
h.on. m. s. km. h. m.in. m. h. m. d., m

(Apo.,25d. uh. P.M. h. m.

h. m.in. m. 245 I W 5 28 O 22 6 31 2 22 9 36 4 42 26 11 16 11 41 6 916 35 5.7

0.07 A.M. OHO. 246, 2 Th 5 29 041 6 29

3 23 10 22
5 II 27

5 7 0 7 245.8 7.07 P.M. sets.
247 3 F
1 0 6 28 4 26 11

7 5 38 28

O 47

6 6.1 3.30 P.M. Óð. 4S 5 31 1 20 6 26 5 29 1 52 4 29 I 7 I 25

8 26 8 44 6.2 6.33 A.M. Ó HC 249 58 5 32

1 39 25 6 341 O 37 31 1 I 44 2 5 9 3 9 24 6.4 10.11 P.M.Ö 8. 250 6 M 5 33

6

23 7 40 1 24 6 59 2 2 25 2 56 9 44 10 15 6.5 9.42 P.M. Ant. sets. 251 7 Tu 5 34 2 20 6 21 8 48

2 13

3° 3 3 8 3 29 10 27 10 48 6.5 1.00 P.M. Ooo. 252 8 W 5 35 2 40 6 20 9 57 3 5 8 7 4 3 53 4 16 11 12 11 35 6.4 ! 12.00 P.M. O H 8. 253 9 Th 5 36 3 1 6 18 11 8

4 1
4 41 5 7

o 6.2 1.00 A.M. gr.H.LN,
5 371 3 22 6 16

O 16
5 0
9 41

6
5 34 6 0

o 26 o 53 6.1 6.52 P.M. dsets.
255 11S
5 38 342 6 15 I 20 6
O 10 41 6 29 6 59 I 19 I 48 5.8

7.07 P.M. Vega S.
256.12 S
5 39 4 3 13

2 16 7
O II 48 8 7 31 8 7

2 50 5.5

7.16 P.M. 2 rises. 257 13 M 5 40 4 24 6 12 3 4 7 59! A.M. 9 8 44 9 21 3 26 4 3 5.3

8.11 P.M. Altair S. 258 14 Tu 5 41 4 45 6 10 3 45 8 54 O 5910 9 55 10 27 4 40 5 14'5.5

7.39 P.N. h rises. 259 15 W 5 42 5 7 6 8

9 47 2 II II 10 59 11 29 5 46 6 185.7 8.15 PM. rises. 260 16 Th 5 42 5 28 6 6 4 51 10 371 3 23 12 II 55

6 48

6.51 P.M. sets. 261 17 F 5 43 5 49 5 5 19 11 25

4 32 13 O 191 o 42 7 38 8 16.1

4.00 A.M. O osup 262 18 S

5 44
6 1116 3 5 47 A.M.

5 41 14 1 3 1 23

8 22

8 42 6.210.57 P.M. Fomal S. 263 19 S 5 45 32 2 6 15 0 1 2

I 42 41 9

I 9 23 6.4 6.29 P.M. o sets. 264 26 M 15 46 6 5316 0 6 45

0 591 7 53 16 2 25 2 451 9 44 10 46.5 4.25 A.M. Ó 4 C. 265 21 Tu 5 47 7 145 58 18 I 478 58 17 3 7 3 27 10 26 10 46 6.5 0.35 A.M. Óhe. 266 22 W 5 48 7 35 5 57 7 54 2 35 10 o 18

3 49 4 11 11 8 11 30 6.5 11.00 A.M. Aut.com, 267 23 Th 5 49 7 56 5 55

8 36 324 11

O 19 4 33 4 56 11 52 6.4 10.46 P.M. Mark. S. 268 24 F 15 50

9 23

4 14 11 55 20 5 19 5 41 O 15 0 38 6.3 7.54 P.M. 7* rise, 269 25 S 5 51 8 37 5 52 10 16 5 4 O 44 21 6 4 6 28 I O

I 23 6.1 7.00 P.M. 4 in Per. 5 528 57 5 50 II II 5 54 I 29 22 6 52 7 17 1 47 2 II 5.9 6.18 P.M. 4 rises. 271 27 M 5 53 9 17 5 49 A.M. 6 42 2

7 45 8 16

2 363 45.6 8.54 P.M. Arc, sets. 272 28 Tu 5 54 9 37 5 47 o 9 7 29 240 24 8 439 14 3 35 4 2 5.3 1.00 P.M. do 273 29

W
5 55 957 5 45 I 9 8 14 3 10 25

9 41 10

5 0 5.3 10.57 P.M. Rig.rises. 274130 Th 15 56 10 16'5 44

8 59 3 37 26 10 34 11 o 5 27 5 53'5.5 1! 6.34 P.M. h rises. SEPTEMBER.

Every man desires to live long, but no man (9) Venus Evening Star; near the Moon on

would be old. the 5th.

True blessedness consisteth in a good life and (9) Venus and ( 0 ) Mars near each other on a happy death. the 7th.

The mind ought sometimes to be amused, A Series of interesting articles in Nature, by

that it may the better return to thought and Mr. Lockyer, on the “Modern Telescope," point

to itself.
out many of the defects of telescopes as now made. A BENEFICENT person is like a fountain water-

The journal of the Cincinnati Observatory ing the earth and spreading fertility ; it is, there-
No. 4 gives the measurements of over five hun fore, more delightful and more honorable to give
dred double stars-a valuable contribution to than to receive.
that branch of astronomy.

Those who quit their proper character to as-
Mr. Lacerda has been making some interest- sume what does not belong to them are for the
ing investigations of the poison of the rattlesnake greater part ignorant of both the character they
at Rio de Janeiro, from which it appears that the leave and of the character they assume.
poison really consists of the spores of a rapidly.
developing organism which preys upon and de-

As to the Christian religion, besides the strong composes the blood. He thinks the best anti-evidence which we have for it, there is a balance dote is alcohol,

in its favor from the number of great men who It has been shown that the periods of sun

have been convinced of its truth after a serious spots closely coincide with the periods of com

consideration of the question. mercial crises, and also with those of locusts, The training of children is a preparation for droughts and famines. It is believed that the the gravest and most important relations of life, interval from minimum to maximum of sun- and upon the character of our home-life must spots is generally dryer and warmer than from rest the well-being of our nation and the permaximum to minimum.

manence of all our institutions.

6 23

[merged small][merged small][ocr errors]

March 24

January 18. Isaac Creamer, Robert P. King,

March 12.

Commencement of Jefferson MedJr., and Isaac Muloch, formerly clerks in the ical College ; 194 graduates. Water Department, convicted of embezzling the - Ninety-second annual session of Philadelmoney of the city, each sentenced to 2 years and phia M. E. Conference at Haines Street Church, 10 months' imprisonment, and to pay fines equal Germantown, Bishop Jesse T. Peck presiding. in amount to the sums embezzled.

March 13. Twenty-seventh annual commenceJanuary 20. Gov. Hartranft commuted the ment of the Woman's Medical College at Assocideath-sentence of Blasius Pistorius, convicted in ation Hall; 20 graduates. Philadelphia of the murder, in Montgomery co., March 14. One hundred and thirteenth annual of Isaac Jacquette, to imprisonment for life. coinmencement of the Medical Department of the

Cotton- and woollen-mills of John Brown & University of Pennsylvania, and first commenceSon, corner of Eighth and Tasker sts., burned. ment of the Dental Department, at the Academy Loss, $200,000.

of Music; 91 medical and 21 dental graduates. Annual meeting of stockholders of Per- - Fifty-eighth annual commencement of the manent Exhibition Company. Number of visitors Philadelphia College of Pharmacy at the Acadduring the year, 297,430; expenses, $45,872.99; emy of Music; 118 graduates. receipts, $42,246.42.

March 18. Celebration, with illumination, January 23. George Beck and George Kear, music, speeches, etc., by Americus Club, Jefferney, ex-clerks of the Water Department, charged son Democratic Club, Nineteenth Ward Dem. with embezzlement of the public moneys, pleaded ocratic Association and Square Association, of guilty, and each sentenced to undergo an im- "the restoration of the legislative power of the prisonment of 18 months and to pay a fine of $50. federal government to the Democratic party for

January 26. The Hebrew Independent Order the first time in nearly twenty years.' of B'Nai Berith of the United Staies commenced March 19. The citizens' yellow fever relief its cinquennial convention at St. George's Hall. committee of 1878 met for the last time and dis

February 1. Augustus F. Boyle, alias Harry solved. The final report showed that $132,096.10 G. Richmond (his stage name), tried for the had been received and distributed murder of Daniel Archer in Tenth st. below Cal.

Fire at smoke-house and hamlowhill, October 29, 1878, acquitted.

curing establishment of Washington Butcher's February 8. Machinery Hall, Fairmount Park, Sons, 146 and 148 North Front st Loss, $30,000, originally built for the use of the Centennial

March 25.

British bark Tulchen, while being Exhibition, and which cost the city of Philadel- towed from Kaighn's Point, N. J., to Girard phia $634,867.48, was sold at auction to W. C. | Point, on the Schuylkill, capsized and sunk in Allison & Son for $24,600. The building consisted twenty-two feet of water at the mouth of the of a main hall 360 feet wide and 1402 feet long, latter river. and an annex 208 by 210 feet. At the same time March 26. Formal transfer of the museum of was sold the Japanese pavilion, west of Memo-metals and minerals of the American Institute of rial Hall, with its annex, for $192.

Mining Engineers to the Pennsylvania Museum February 11. Newsboys' Home, 228 South and School of Industrial Art, at Memorial Hall, Ninth st., formally dedicated by the Newsboys' West Park, Aid Society.

March 28. The church - building formerly February 17 British steamship Wycliffe, known as the Lutherbaum (English Lutheran) which sailed from Philadelphia on January 29, Church, at Twelfth and Oxford sts., dedicated bound to St. Naziare and loaded with wheat, for the service of the new Moravian congregawrecked at the entrance of the river Loire. tion; subsequently named Church of the Holy Loss, $256,000.

Trinity. February 18. Convention of the Association March 29. Corner-stone laid of new Leverof the Disciples of Christ in the United States ington Presbyterian Church, Roxborough. commenced sessions in the church on Twelfth March 31. Ninth anniversary of the ratificast above Wallace.

tion of the Fifteenth Amendment to the ConstiFebruary 24. Semi-centennial celebration of tution of the United States celebrated at the the establishment of Paul Street M. E. Church, Permanent Exhibition by colored people. Frankford. Sermon by the Rev. Jefferson Lewis, - Fire and explosion at Belmont oil-works, the first pastor of the church.

Twenty-fourth and Mifflin sts. Two men burned February 28. Twenty-third annual commence- to death, and one man very badly injured. Loss, ment of Pennsylvania Dental College at the $80,000. Academy of Music; 42 graduates.

April 3.

Kensington coffee-house and free March 1, Cracker-bakery of Walter G. Wilson reading and writing - rooms opened at 1939 & Co., 212 and 214 North Front st., destroyed by Frankford road. fire. Loss, $40,000.

April 6. Fire broke out in five-story brick March 2. New church-building of Belmont industrial building, north-cast corner Race and M. E. Church, Forty-first and Aspen sts., ded- Crown sts., occupied by James Smith & Co., icated

manufacturers of inill-supplies, J. Wagner, shoeOne hundred and first anniversary manufacturer, S. R. & F Hansel, military and of the birth of Robert Emmett celebrated by coach trimmings, and others, and extended to Irish national clubs at Musical Fund Hall, the building north-west corner of Fourth and Race March 10.

Commencement of Hahnemann Sts., occupied by William Waterall & Co., dealers Medical College (homeopathic), at the Academy in paints and colors, Ignatius Kohler, bookseller of Music; 61 graduates,

and printer, H. Muhr & Sons, jewelers, and - The building formerly the Arch Street others. Upon North Fourth st. the establishOpera-House opened as “The Park Theatre," ments of Misch, beer-botiler, F. Volker, saloon, under the management of George K. Good and the Swift & Courtney match-factory were win.

burned and other properties injured. South-west

March 4.

« EelmineJätka »