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LEDGER BUILDING,

S. W. Cor. Sixth and Chestnut Streets,

PHILADELPHIA, DECEMBER, 1879.

The eleventh annual issue of the Public LEDGER

ALMANAC is herewith presented to the subscribers to the Ledger as an every-day companion for the year 1880. It is furnished free of cost. It is not published for sale, and none are to be sold.

The Ledger Almanac has become a home book of reference and a treasury of useful information on local and general subjects and events.

No care or expense has been spared to make it eminently trustworthy.

GEORGE W. CHILDS.

WESTCOTT & THOMSON, Stereotypers and Electrotypers, Philada.

COLLINS, PRINTER,

Philarda.

ORIGIN OF TOWNSHIPS, INCOR- Point-no-Point. It took its name from Joseph

PORATED DISTRICTS AND BOR- Kirkbride, who for many years was land-owner OUGHS IN THE CITY AND COUNTY | Creek, and to whom the Legislature gave a right

there and proprietor of a ferry over Frankford OF PHILADELPHIA.

to build a bridge and receive toll for passage Aramingo, a borough created out of the town. over the same by act of March 20, 1811. On ship of the Northern Liberties, incorporated April 1, 1833, the county of Philadelphia bought April 11, 1850. It was shaped something like a the Kirkbride bridge and two and a half acres broad V reversed. It was bounded on the north- of land annexed for $5500. Kirkbridesburg was east by a portion of the borough of Bridesburg considered too long a name for convenient use, and the Frankford Creek, which divided it from and the shorter one was adopted. Bridesburg a portion of Oxford township and Frankford; on was incorporated as a borough on April 1, 1848. the north-west the Unincorporated Northern Lib- Bristol, a township at the north end of the erties and the District of the Northern Liberties county, at the intersection of the angle which were boundaries, the latter partly on the south- runs down from the extreme point of the city west; and Richmond district on the south-east | boundary and Montgomery county. It was of and south-west. The name is an abbreviation irregular form, and was bounded on the northand alteration from the Indian name of the west by a portion of Springfield township, stream adjacent, called, by the Swedes and Montgomery county ; on the north-east by ChelEnglish, Gunner's Run. The original name tenham, Montgomery county. It extended along was Tumanaranaming, the meaning of which is the latter to Oxford township, but was bounded not now known. By cutting off a portion of the mainly on the east by Tacony Creek, on the head and tail of the name, and omitting two let south partly by the Wingohocking and the townters in the centre and adding an o, the word ship of the Northern Liberties, and on the west Aramingo was fabricated.

and south-west by Germantown township. The Belmont, a district created by act of April 14, Old York road ran through it to Branchtown and 1853. It embraced that part of Blockley town- Milestown, and thence to Bucks county. Greatest ship which lay along the river Schuylkill from length, 52 miles; greatest breadth, 3 miles ; the northern boundary-line of West Philadelphia area, 5650 acres. The time of its formation is to the northern boundary-line between Phila- unknown, but it takes date at an early period. delphia and Montgomery counties, and had also The name is derived from the city of Bristol its western boundary on that line. This district in England. had scarcely time to be organized before the Act Byberry, a township in the extreme northof Consolidation of Feb. 2, 1854, put an end eastern part of the county of Philadelphia ; to its franchises. The name was derived from bounded on the east and north-east by PoquesBelmont, the country-seat of the Peters family, sing Creek and Bucks county: on the northwhich is now a portion of Fairmount Park. The west by Montgomery county; and on the west mansion was erected by William Peters about and south-west by the township of Moreland. 1743, and the name was descriptive of the fine Its greatest length was estimated at 5 miles ; position of the property, and suggestive of the its greatest breadth, 212 miles; area, 4700 beautiful views of the river and valley of the acres. It was settled by a few Swedes preSchuylkill visible from the site. The property vious to the year 1675, and in that year by became the estate of Judge Richard Peters of four brothers-Nathaniel, Thomas, Daniel and the United States District Court in 1786, and he William Walton--who were all young and single lived there until his death, which happened Aug. men. They had arrived at New Castle from 22, 1828.

England early in that year, and, having prosBlockley, a township on the west side of the pected the land in the neighborhood of the Schuylkill River, north of Kingsessing town. Delaware, chose the country near Poquessing ship: bounded on the east by the river ; Creek, and settled there. They gave to it the tending south from the county-line, opposite to, name of Byberry, in honor of their native town, but a liule below, the mouth of the Wissahickon, near Bristol in England. They were joined, after down to the Nanganesy or Mill Creek, below the the arrival of the ship Welcome in 1682, by Giles Woodlands; thence by the same creek up to and Joseph Knight, John Carver, John Heart, Chadd's Ford turnpike, known in later years as the Richard Collet and their families, and others. Baltimore pike; along the same to Cobb's Creek; The township of Byberry was established at a thence by the courses of the same to the county- very carly date after the coming of Penn. It line adjoining Lower Merion township, Mont- contained very few villages at the time of congomery county, and along the same to the river solidation, and was the most rural of all the Delaware. It was traversed by the Darby road, townships of Philadelphia county. Byberry the Chadd's Ford or Baltimore pike, the road to Cross-Roads,once called Plumbsock and KnightsWest Chester, to Haverford and to Lancaster. ville, were the principal villages. Within its boundaries were the villages of Hamil- Delarvare, a township formed out of a portion ton, Mantua, West Philadelphia, Hestonville and of Dublin township, in 1853. Its inhabitants Haddington. The greatest length, 4 miles; the voted at one general election. Its officers were greatest breadth, 5 miles; area, 7580 acres. The superseded in the next year by consolidation. date of the formation of this township is not Dublin, commonly called "Lower Dublin, a known. It was created at a very early period township in the upper part of the county, adjoinafter the establishment of the provincial govern- ing Moreland and Byberry on the south, exiendment. The name is supposed to have been de ing south-east nearly in parallel line to Poquesrived from Blockley, a parish in England in the sing Creek and the Delaware River. Bustleton, county of Worcester.

Fox Chase and Holmesburg were in this townBridesburg, a village south of Frankford Creek ship. It was 5 miles at the greatest length, 3 and upon a tract of land formerly belonging to miles in breadth ; area, 9500 acres.

This town

CX

4

(1880.

Second Month,]

FEBRUARY.
MOON'S PHASES, Philadelphia.
d. h. m.

d. h. m.
(Last Quarter 3 10 38 A.M. D First Quarter 17 10 45 P.M.

New Moon...10 6 17 A.M. Full Moon ....25 8 21 P.M.

Day of the Year.
Day of the Month.
Day of the Week.

PHENOMENA.

5 23

1 30

2 50 5.7
4 10 5.4

THE SUN, THE MOON,

THE TIDES,
Philadelphia. Philadelphia.

Philadelphia.
Rises Souths Sets Rises. Souths Sets. Bigb Tido. Low Tide.

( Per., 6d. oh, P.M. A.M. P.M. P.M. P.M.A.M. A.M. A.M.P.M. A.M. P.M.

(Apo.,18d.19h. M. h.m. m. s. k...h.m. h. m. A. m. d. h. m. h. 1. h. m h. m. 32 IS 7 913 49 5 18 11 24 3 54 9 25 21 5 0

0 19 6.4

4.40 A.M. rises. 33 2 M 7 8 13 56 5 20 A.M. 4 44 9 56 22 5 46 6 11 O 42 I 5 6.3 9.49 P.M. Sirius S. 341 3 Tu 7 7 14 35 21 o 35 5 37 10 33 23 6 37 7 5

I 56 6.0 6.36 P.M. S. 35 4

W
7 6 14 9 5 22 1 47 6 35 II 17 24 7 37 8 13

2 24

9.58 P.M. Arc. rises, 36 5

Th
7 5 14 14 5 23 2 57 7 35 O II 25!

8 51 9 30
3 32

7:51 P.M. 4 sets, 37 6 F 7 4 14 19 5 25 8 37 1 14 26 10 7 10 44 4 49 5 26

5.3 6.34 P.M. 7 * S. 38

7 3 14 22 5 26 4 57 9 38 2 24 27 11 19 11 506 3 6 38 5.6 7.13 AM3 ? (. 39

S
7 2 14 25.5 27 5 43 10 37 338 28

O 20 7 9 7 39 5.9 | 10.37 P.M. Spica rises 409

M
7 1 14 27 5 28
6 21 11 32 4 51 291 046 1 9

8
5
28 6.1

7.50 P.M. Capel. N. 41 10 Tuz

o 14 28 5 29 6 53 o 23 2 O 1 30 I 52 8 49 9 11 6.3 2.56 A.M. Ó O C. 42 11 W 6 58 14 29 5 30

7 22

I II 9 1 2 13 2 35 9 32 9 54 6.4 1.16 A.M. HS. 43 12 Th 6 57 14 29 5 32

7 48

I 56 8 15 2 2 55 3 15 10 14 10 34 6.5 10.03 A.M. Ó 2 C. 6 56 14 28 5 33 8 13 2 41 9 19 3) 3 35 354 10 54 11 13 6.5 9.28 P.M. h sets.

6 54 14 26 5 34 8 39 3 25 10 22 4 4 14 4 34 11 33 11 53 6.5 1.00 P.M. O sap 46 15 8 6 53 14 23 5 35 9 6 4 10 II 23 5 4 551 5 15

O 14 6.4 9.51 P.M. Procy. S. 52 14 20 5 369 36 4 56 A.M. 5 36 5 57 o 34 o 55 6.2 11.37 P.M. oc. € Arietis. 48.17 Tu 6 51 14 16 5 38 10 10 5 44 O 24

20 6 43 I 16 I 39 6.0 4.57 A.M. Prises. 49 18 W 6 49 14 11 5 39 10 50 33

1 22

8 7 351 2 2 2 27 5.8 5.21 A.M. Ó C. 50 19 Th 6 48 14 5 5 40 11 37 7 23

2 18 9 4 8 36 2 54 3 23 5.5 9.03 P.M. Algen, seta. 6 47 13 59 5 41 o 29 8 13 3 8 10

9
8 9 39 3 55 4 27 5.3

6.01 P.M. & S. 6 45 13 52 5 42 1 27 9 3 3 54 II 10 8 10 38 4 58 527 5.4

9.32 P.M. Pollux S. 53 22 8 6 44 13 45 5 44

9 53 4 33 12 11 6 11 34 5 57 6 25 5.6 7.04 P.M. 24 sets. 54 23 M 6 42 13 37 5 45 3 33 10 41 5 8 13

00 6 53 7 19 5.8 6.00 A.N. OO. 55 24 Tu 6 41 13 28 5 46, 4 38 11 28 5 39 14 023 0 461 742 5 6.0 11.01 P.M. sets. 56.25 W 6 39 13 18 5 47 5 45 A.M.

6 1 26 8 35 8 45 6.2 | 16.00 P.88 H . 57 26 Th 6 38 13

6 53 0 15 6 33 16 I 45 2 71 9 4 9 26 6.3 0.03 A.M. O H. 58 27 F 6 36 72 58 5 50 8 2

7 017 2 27 2 481 9 46 10 7,6.5 8.40 P.M. h sets. 6 35 12 47 5 51 9 13 I 50 7 28 18

3 9 3 31 10 28 10 50 6.5 8.00 P.M. 0 0 4. 6 29 S 16 33 12 35 5 52 10 25 2 40 7 59 10 3 53 4 1711 12 11 36 6.5 6.00 A.M.P in U.

44 13 F 45 14 S

47 76 M

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Fixed and Movable Feasts, Fasts, etc., 1880.

FEBRUARY. Epiphany......

.Jan. 6

(9) VENUS near the old Moon before sunrise Shrove Tuesday..

Feb.

9 of the 7th. Ash Wednesday.

10 (4) Jupiter near the young Moon in the evenValentine's Day

ing of the 12th.

10) Mars near the bright Moon on the 17th St. Patrick's Day.

and 18th. Palm Sunday......

ABOUT forty observations of the transit of Maunday Thursday..

25

Mercury, in 1879, by private observers, have been Good Friday.

26 received at the Observatory in Washington. Easter Sunday.

28

From the observations and calculations of va. Ascension Day.

.May 6

rious astronomers, the existence of at least one Whitsunday...

16 planet between Mercury and the sun seems quite

probable. Trinity Sunday....

23 St. John the Baptist's Day.. ..June 24

A REMARKABLE hailstorin passed near Toron. All Saints' Day....

Nov.

to, Canada, in August, 1878. Hailstones weigh

ing as much as one and a half pounds were found, All Souls' Day..

while those weighing one half pound and upward Advent Sunday.

were very abundant. Christmas Day.

The University of Wisconsin has a new reSt. John the Evangelist's Day.

27 fractor, by Clark, with an aperture of fifteen

and a half inches, and a focal length of twenty

feet. There is an interval of about two inches Prop. Newton, of Yale, has published a very between the two lenses of the object-glass. The interesting paper on " The Origin of Comets." astronomer in charge is Prof. J. C. Watson.

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