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Sixth Month,]

JUNE

(1874.

Day of the Year.
Day of the Month.
Day of the Week.

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THE SUN, THE MOON,

THE TIDES,
Philadelphia. Philadelphia.

Philadelphia.
Rises Souths Sets Rises. Souths Sets.

Low Tide.

( Per., rod. gh. P.M. A.M. P.M. P.M. P.M. A.M. A.M. A.M. P.M. A.M. P.M. h.m. m. s.h.m. h. m. h. m. k. m. d.

(Apo.,22d. 7h. P.M.

h.m. h. m. h. m. h. m. 152 IM 4 34 9 17 O45 5 10 17

2 37 9 31 9 56 6.08 P.M. Ở đ. 153 2 Tu 4 34 2 19 7 22 10 12 I 41 6

3 1 3 26 10 20 10 45 6.5 0.06 A.M. Reg. sets. 154 3

W
4 341 2 9 7 23 10 59

2 38 7

6 19
3 52

4 16 11 1 11 35 6.5 9.22 P.M. 9 sets. 155 4 Th 4 33 1 59 7 24 11 37 3 34 8 14 20

4 42
5 7

16.4 9.53 P.M. O h. 156 5 F 4 33 I 49 7 24 A.M. 4 28

927 21

5 33 5 55 0 26 0 52 6.2 8.38 P.M. O gr. 8.IN. 4 32 1 39 7 25 O 10 5 20 10 39 22 6 20 6 44 I 14

6.33 P.M. 4 south. 158 7S 4 32

1 28 7 25 o 37 6 9 11 51 23 7 10 7 362 3 2 49 5.7 8.04 P.M. sets. 159 8 M 14 32 I 16 7 26 1 3 6 58 I 3 24 8

4

2 55 3 23 5.5 8.12 P.M. Sir. sets, 160 9 Tu 4 32 I

I 27 7 46 2 16 25 9 5 9 37 3 54 4 245.3 10.51 P.M h rises, 161110 W

4 32 o 53 7 27 1 53 8 36 3 30 26 10 6 10 36 4 56 5 25 5.4 10.15 A.M. (. 162 11 Th 4 32 O41 7 27 2 23 9 28 4 45 27 11 711 381 5 551 6 26 5.7 0.35 A.M. 2 sets. 163 12 F 4 32 2917 28 2 54 10 24 6 5 28

7 57 7 26 5.8 9.30 P.M. 9 sets. 164 13 S 4 32 O 16 7 28 3 34 II 23 7 20 29 O 35

7 54 216.1 10.13 P.M. 0 4 0. 165 S

4 32
o 3 7 29 4 24

8 28 o

I 54 8 46 9 13 6.3 0.58 P.M. doc. 166 15 M 4 32 o 9 7 29

5 24
1 26 9 25
1 2 21 2 481 9 40 10 7

5.53 P.M. Ở ” (. 167 16 Tu 4 32

o 22 7 29
6 30 2 24 10 11

3 14 3 39 10 33 10 57 6.5 6.20 A.M. SYO. 763 17 W 4 32 O 35 7 30 7 38 3 17 10 46 3 4 3 4 27 11 22 11 46 6.5 7.30 A.M. Ó H (. 169 18 Th 4 32 0 48 7 30 8 46 4 6 11 15 4 4 49 5 12

o

7-30 P.M. Spica S. 170 19 F

4 32 1 17 301 951 4 50 11 39 5 5 32 5 51 021 051 6.3 10.11 P.M. h rises. 4 32 I 14 7 3010 53 5 31 A.M. 6

II 6 31 1 10 1 30 6.1 11.31 P.M. 84 C. 4 32 1 27 7 3111 52

0 1

50 7 11 I 50 2 95.9 10.07 A.M. Sum. beg. 4 32 I 40 7 31 O 51 6 50 0 21

31 7 55 2 30 2 50 5.7 11.50 P.M. 2 sets, 17423 Tu 4 33 I 537 31 I 50 7 30

9 8 20 8 45 3 14

3 39 5.4 10.14 P.M Ant. S. 4 33 2 6 7 31 2 51 8 11

1 I 10

911 9 37 4 4 4 30 5.3 7.58 P.M. Arct. S. 176 25 Th 4 34 2 19 7 31

3 53 8 55 I 24 11 10 3 10 29 4 56 5 22 5.4 9.33 P.M. sets. 4 34 2 31 7 31 4 58 9 43 1 51 12 10 58 11 24 5 48 6 17 5.6 10.31 P.M. Reg. sets. 178 27 S 4 34 2 44 7 31

6
3 10 36 2 24 13 11 52

6 43 7 11 5.7 9.07 P.M. Os. N. W.by W. 4 35 2 50 7 31 7 7 11 31 3 4 14 o 19 0 451 7 38 8 416.0

2.27 A.M. &gr. el. E. 180 29 M 4 35 3 8 7 31 8 5 A.M. 3 55 15 1 9 I 33 8 28 8 52 6.2 8.23 A.M. 8 in 0. 181|36|Tu 14 36 3 2017 31|| 8 55 o 29 4 55 16 | 1 58 2 241 9 171 9 43 6.4 9.26 P.M. h rises. PLANETS.

cated by the sign Ó, followed by the signs of the MERCURY (8) will be at its greatest western

planet and Moon. elongation April 15, August 13 and December 2, and its greatest eastern clongation March 2, June 28 and Oct. 24. The first three dates will be the

JUNE. most favorable times for seeing this planet in the evening, and the last three in the morning.

Mercury will be visible in the evening about VENUS ( 9 ) will be morning star until Feb. 23,

sunset on the 27th. and then evening star until its transit over the

The Moon will be Sun's disk, December 8. Its greatest brilliancy

4° 34' south of Saturn on the 4th. is when evening star, November 2,

3° 24' north of Mars on the 14th, Mars () will be quite near the Sun during

30 o' north of Mercury on the 15th. most of this year. It may be seen about sunset

3° 22' north of Venus on the 16th. until its conjunction in July, and then before sun

2° 17' north of Jupiter on the moth. rise until the end of the year, when it rises about five hours before the Sun.

JUPITER (24) will be visible during the first half I THINK Philadelphia may well be proud of the of the year. It rises about II P.M. the first week Public Ledger and the manner in which it is in January, and sets about 8 P.M. the last week in conducted. It is truly gratifying to see how fast August, and can therefore be seen every clear it is gaining in favor under the energy, enterprise night before midnight for eight months.

and successful management of Mr. Childs, whom SATURN (h) rises about 9 P.M. on the ist of I am most delighted to call a warm personal July, and can be seen every clear evening after- friend. The independent and manly tone of the ward until the end of the year. The conjunction of the Moon with the planets cious defamation, its upholding the cause of hu

Ledger, its absence from all personality and malias it passes round the heavens each month will manity and religion and its advocacy of the interserve to point them out. These conjunctions are all given among the Phenomena, and are indi-l it to every good citizen.-Major-General Meade.

ests of the masses, are facts that should commend

179 28 S

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RATES OF POSTAGE.

POSTAGE TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES. The following will show the rates of postage on The following table shows the rates of postage letters : also the postage on newspapers, books, chargeable on letters and newspapers to the forpamphlets and all mailable matter to and from eign countries and places named in alphabetical all parts of the United States.

order.

Not
LETTERS.
Each y oz.

News-
LETTERS.

exceed'g
oz.

papers. Letters to any part of the United

Aspinwall..

Iocts. 2 cts. States

Austria, via N. German Union *6

3 Drop letters-that is, letters mailed

Austria, via England. in a city, to be delivered elsewhere

Australia,
do.

16 in the same city...

2 cts.

do. via Brindisi. Postal cards to any part of the U. S. 1 ct. each. Belgium..........

*8 Registered letters are charged 15

Brazil.......

15 cents in addition to the proper post

Canada, Nova Scotia, New

I ct. per foundland, etc...

*6 age.

2 oz.

Canada and Newfoundland, NEWSPAPERS, Books, Mose., ETC.

For every U. S. postal cards to require

extra stamp Central America..

IO Newspapers, circulars and other print

Chili, Bolivia, Ecuador and ed matter (except books), seeds, cut

Peru tings, bulbs, roots and scions, in

China, via San Francisco....... packages not exceeding 4 lbs. in

do. via Southampton.

28 weight, for each 2 oz. or fraction.... I ct.

Denmark, via England.

*10

7 Books, in packages not exceeding 4 lbs.

do. via Bremen or Hamin weight, for each 2 oz. or fraction 2 cts.

burg.......

*7

6 Merchandise and samples, in packages

East Indies, via San Francisco 10 not exceeding 12 oz. in weight, for

do. via England

6 each 2 oz, or fraction ....

2 cts.
do. via Brindisi

28

8 Newspapers, circulars and periodicals

France, direct. not exceeding 2 oz. in weight, deposited for local delivery.....

I ct. each

German States, via North Ger-
man Union

*6

3 Exceeding 2 oz., for each additional

German States, via England... 2 OZ......

I ct,

Great Britain. All matter not prepaid at letter rates must be

Holland..... so wrapped that it can be examined without de- Italy, via England...

4 stroying the wrapper, and must not contain any Ireland, England and Scotland #6 writing whatever, inside or outside, except the

Mexico

IO

3 address; but samples may be numbered to cor- Montevideo, Buenos Ayres,etc. 18 respond with the numbers in a descriptive letter. Norway and Sweden..

*10 Liquids, poisons, explosives and other danger- Portugal, via Southampton *16 ous matters are excluded.

Russia, via England.

*12

7 MONEY ORDERS. Spain, do.

7 Switzerland, do.

4 Rates on money orders in U.S. : Not exceed

Turkey, Syria, etc., via Enging $20, ten cents; over $20 to $30, fifteen cents; land,

8 over $30 to $40, twenty cents; over $40 to $50,

West Indies,

direct. twenty-five cents. No fractions of cents to be in

do. (British), via St. troduced.

Thomas or Havana.

18

4 Money orders to Great Britain and Switzer

West Indies (not British), via land: Not exceeding $10, twenty-five cents ;

St. Thomas or Havana........ 18

4 over $10 to $20, fifty cents; over $20 to $30, seventy-five cents; over $30 to $40, one dollar; The asterisk (*) indicates that the postage may be paid over $40 to $50, one dollar and twenty-five cents.

or not, at the option of the sender of the letter. Money orders to Germany: Not exceeding $5: || ing explanation is necessary: 'The postage set down in

1 There being no postal treaty with France, the followfifteen cents; over $5 to $10, twenty-five cents; the table applies only to letters sent by the line of French over $10 to $20, fifty cents; over $20 to $30, steamers sailing from New York. French letters may also seventy-five cents; over $30 to $40, one dollar: be sent as follows: Open mail paid only to England, 4 over $40 to $50, one dollar and twenty-five cents.

cents for % oz., prepayment optional, via England; for

* oz. and under, 10 cents; overy and not over % oz., 16 The postage charges must also be paid on the

cents; over 4 and not over 36 oz., 20 cents; over % and letters in which the orders are transmitted.

not over 1 oz., 26 cents, prepayment compulsory. The Public Ledger Almanac is an annual pre- gigantic Public Ledger buildings, and gives some sentation to the numerous subscribers of Mr. exceedingly instructive particulars of the history Childs' newspaper, the Public Ledger of Phila- of that periodical which has been so intimately delphia, a journal which deservedly holds the associated with the enterprise and deserved success foremost rank in the United States. The Almanac of its editor and proprietor. Press men throughout is full of most interesting scraps of information, the universe may well be proud of Mr. George W. and forms an excellent guide to the city of Phila- Childs.-From Public Opinion, London, March delphia. It contains a beautiful illustration of the

30, 1872.

2

47 *6 *10 #10

12

*10

#12

10

2

Seventh Month,]

JULY

[1874.

MOON'S PHASES, Philadelphia.
d. h. m.

d.

h. m.
(Last Quarter 6

II P.M. First Quarter 21 8 30 A.M.
New Moon...
13 II 27 A.M.

Full Moon... 28 11 42 P.M.

PHENOMENA.

Day of the Year
| Day of the Month.
| Day of the Week.

Height
Jeet.

2 49

6 22

6 43

3 22

191 10 F 192 11S 193 12 S

7 23 28

THE SUN, THE MOON,

THE TIDES,
Philadelphia. Philadelphia,

Philadelphia,
Rises Souths Sets Rises. Souths Sets. High Tide. Low Tide.

(Per., 7d. oh. A.M.
A.M. P.M. P.M. T.M. A.M. A.M. A.M.P.M. A.M. P.M.
h.m.. s.h.m. h. m. h. m. h. m. d. h. m. h. m. h. m. h, m.

(Apo., 20d. 2h. P.M. 182 1W 4 36 3 317 31 9 38 I 27 6 3 17

3 14 10
8 10 33 6.5
4.IO P.M.

hc. 183 2 Th 4 37 3 43 7 31 10 12 2 23 7 16 18

3 39 4 4 10 58 11 23 6.5

9.31 P.M. sets, 184 3 F 4 37 3 54 7 31 10 41 3 17 8 3019 4 27 4 49 11 46 6.4 5.35 P.M. O in Apo. 185 4 S 4 38 4 4 7 31 11 7 4 7 9 43 20 5 13 5 35 O 8 o 32 6.3

9.10 P.M. h rises. 1861 5 S 4 38 4 15 7 31 11 31 4 56 10 55 21 5 571 6 20

O 54 I 16 6.1 8.55 A.M.O. 187 6 M 4 39 4 25 7 30 11 56 5 43 O

7 8 I 39 2 25.9

10.59 P.M, 4 sets. 188 7 Tu 4 39 4 35 7 30|| A.M. 6 32 I 1923 7 34

8

3 2 27 2 53 5.6 5.32 P.M. ÓWC. 189 8 W 4 40 4 44 7 30 O 23 7 22 2 33 24 8 35 9 8

3 54 5.3 9.15 P.M. Ants. 1909 Th 4 41 4 53 7 29 o 53 8 15 3 48 25 9 41 10 14 4 27 5 0 5.3 0.43 P.M. in Aph.

4 41 5 27 29 1 30 9 12 5 3 26 10 48 11 22 5 436 75.6 2.11 A.M. Arct. sets. 4 42 5 10 7 29 2 15 10 II 6 13 27 11 55

41 7 145.8 7.19 A.M. * station, 4 43 5 18 7 28 3 9 11 12

O 24 o 52 7 43 § 116.0 11.09 P.m. Vega S. 194 13 M 4 43 5 26 28 4 12 O II 8

3 29
I 41

0 6.2

5.53 A.M. Oo. 195 14 Tu 4 44 5 33 7 27 5 20

1

27 2 31 9 26 9 50 6.4 3.45 P.M. Ở * 4. 4 45 5 39 7 27 6 29 1 57 9 14

2

2 52 3 1610 11 10 35 6.5 9.21 P.M9 sets. 197 16 Th 4 46

5 45 7 26 7 35 2 43 941 3 3 36 3 56 10 55 11 15 6.5 8.41 A.M OPC. 4 46 5 50 7 25 8 39 3 26 10 3 4 4 16 4 36 11 35 11 55 6.5 8.16 P.M. h rises 4 47 555 7 25 9 40 4 7 10 23 5 4 54 5 13

0 13 6.4 2.47 P.M. 4 (. 200 19 S 0 7 24 10 40 4 46 10 43 65 29 5 48 o 32 0 48 6.3

5.26 A.M. Pol. N. 201 20 M 4 49 6 37 23 11 38 5 25 11 31 7 6 6 6 26 I 7 I 25 6.1 10.08 P.M. 24 sets. 202 21 Tu 4 50 6 6 7 23 0 38 6 6 11 25 8

6 45 7 5 1 45 2

45.9

8.23 P.M. Ant. S. 20322

W
4 51

6
97 22 I 40 6 49 11 50 9 7 28 7 54 2 24 2 47 5.7

10.30 P.M. Vega S. 204 23 Th 4 51

6 II 7 21
2 43 7 35 A.M. 10

8 51 3 13 3 41 5.4 4.54 P.M.O.O. 720 3 48 8 25

O 2011

9 23 9 53 4 10 4 42 5:3 11.34 P.M. Alt. S. 206 25 S 4 53 6 13 7 19 4 52 9 19 O 57 12 10 24 10 57

5 43 5.5 7.46 P.M. O O O Inf. 4 54

6

137 19 5 53 10 16 I 43 13 11 28 11 59 6 16 6 47 5.8 1.18 A.M. Rig, rises. 4 55 6 13 7 18 6 47 11 15 2 40 14

o 27 7 18 7 46 5.9 7.35 PM. h rises, 209 28 Tu 4 56 6 12 7 17 7 34 A.M. 3 46 15

o 54 I 19 8 13 8 38 6.2 9.05 P.M. sets. W 4 57 TO 7 16 8 11 0 13 4 59 16 I 43

8

9 2 9 27 6.3 2.32 P.M. O . 211 30 Th 4 57 6 8 7 158 42 I 8 6 14 17 2 33 2 56 9 52 10 15 6.5 1.02 A.M. Arct, sets. 212 31 F 4 58 6 517 1411 9 10 2 1

3 19! 3 41 10 38111 0 6.5 ||10.07 P.M. Fom.rises.

1 17

8 36 9

I

61 8 43

196 15 W

198 17 F 199 18 S

4 48 6

8 22

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JULY.

he replied: "Reliability, respectability and adDuring this month the Moon will be

vertisements as advertisements. We prefer to 21' south of Saturn on the ist.

suppress news rather than publish matter which north of Mars on the 13th.

we are not sure of. I will not allow a line to go 52' north of Mercury on the 14th. into the paper that is unfit for the eye of the most 10' north of Venus on the 16th.

refined woman. We never insert advertisements 1° 52' north of Jupiter on the 18th.

as general reading matter.' Thus Mr. Childs 4° 15' south of Saturn on the 2gth.

gives his fellow-citizens a newspaper that they can

swear by, and place in the hands of their children At the corner of Sixth and Chestnut streets is without fear. He has his reward. Beginning life the splendid pile of the Ledger Building, which as a poor boy, he is to-day one of the wealthiest Mr. George W. Childs, while thinking he was and most influential of Philadelphia's citizens.only providing himself with a handsome and com- New York Times, Dec. 27 ; Special Correspondmodious place of business, was really crecting as ence from Philadelphia. a lasting monument commemorative of his untiring energy and enterprise. The Ledger is a great THE DEBT OF PENNSYLVANIA. institution here. Families take it and read it as ACCORDING to the report of the Commissioners religiously as they say their prayers, and the very of the Sinking Fund of Pennsylvania, there was remarkable feature of newspaper business is a balance in the Treasury on October 1, 1873, of hown in the fact that nearly the entire circulation $1,707,658; during September the debt was reof the Ledger-amounting to eighty-five thousand duced by the redemption of loans $209,800; the copies daily--is delivered by carriers at the houses whole debt of the Siate is $25,871,716. On the of regular subscribers. Few copies of the paper 1st of December, 1872, the debt of the State was are sold at the news-stands, simply because all $27,303,594, so that during the last ten months have their family copy at home. I asked Mr. there has been a reduction of $1,431,878. In the Childs the other day what is the secret of his last four years and ten months the State debt has great and unprecedented success. “ It is this,'

been reduced $6,941,824.

ex

PHILADELPHIA CHRONOLOGY

January ? The Constitutional Convention of FOR 1872-3.

Pennsylvania commenced its session in Philadel

phia, in the building formerly Sixth Presbyterian 1872. December 5. Jos. Pallatte died at 1015 Church, Spruce street between Fifth and Sixth. North Second street from the effects of blows upon January 9. Rev. W. H. Hare, D. D., was conthe head, which the Coroner's jury found were secrated Protestant Episcopal Missionary Bishop giren by Wm. H. Worrell. January 31, 1873, of Niobrara at St. Luke's' Protestant Episcopal Warrell was tried for the murder, and acquitted. Church. Ten bishops participated in the cere

December 7. Corner-stone of the building of the monies, Penna. Academy of Fine Arts laid at the south- The ship Tuscarora, of Cope & Brother's vest corner of Broad and Cherry streets.

Liverpool line, bound from Mobile to Liverpool, December 8. Roman Catholic Church of the foundered off the coast of Portugal. Capt. R. Immaculate Conception at Front and Canal streets M. Dunlevy, Jr., and fourteen of the crew were dedicated.

drowned; first mate and nine men were saved. December 14. John Tweedie died from com- January 17 Heavy freshet on the Delaware pression of the brain, caused by blows received in and Schuylkill Rivers, caused by great rains and a cell of the sixth Police district station-house, breaking up of the ice. Much valuable property December 11. Police Sergeant John A. Rodgers, carried away and destroyed on those rivers, and charged with the murder, was convicted on Janu. also upon the Wissahickon, Frankford, Pennyary 25, 1873, of murder in the second degree, and pack and other creeks. sentenced June 14 to an imprisonment of ten years January 20. Meeting of the committee of three in the Eastern Penitentiary.

hundred on Centennial Celebration in Common December 15 Lehigh Avenue M. E. Church, Council chamber. $212,750 subscribed in addition comer of Lehigh avenue and Hancock street, to subscriptions previously obtained. dedicated

James Ncely tried for killing his wife at 1420 - Roman Catholic Church St. Bonifacius, cor- Fitzwater street, October 14, 1872; sound guilty ner of Mascher and Diamond streets, dedicated. of murder in the second degree, and sentenced

German Evangelical Lutheran Church of April 12 to six years' imprisonment in the PeniSt. Peter, Forty-second and Myrtle strects, West tentiary. Philadelphia, consecrated.

January 21. Owen Quirk tried for the murder December 16. The Grand Jury came into court of his brother, Lawrence Quirk, at 2044 Reeves with a special presentment stating that the Girard street, September 12, 1872, was acquitted. avenue bridge was insecure, weak and unsafe for January 22. Patrick Callahan, tried for the travel, and recommending that it be closed against murder of Charles Carnigan, September 16, 1870, further use.

at 402 North Water street, was acquitted. December 19. Lamb's patent street car, pro

The boiler of the locomotive

Edge Hill" pelled by an engine having a boiler charged with ploded at American and Norris streets, North steam, was run over the Frankford end of the Pennsylvania Railroad; killed one man, wounded Fifth and Sixth Streets Passenger Railway track, several, and did serious injury to adjoining propa distance of seven miles and a quarter, with a erty. pressure of one hundred and seventy-seven pounds January 29. Patrick Smith, charged with the at the beginning, which was reduced to fifty pounds murder of William Spellissy, November 9, 1872, at the end experiment.

was found guilty of murder in the first degree. December 22. German Methodist Episcopal New trial granted June 13: Church, York street above Frankford avenue, January 30: Matthew McCully, charged with dedicated.

the murder of Hugh Graham, September 13, 1872, Roman Catholic Church St. Elizabeth, was tried in the Court of Oyer and Terminer, and Twenty-third and Berks streets, dedicated. acquitted.

Grace Mission Presbyterian Church, Twenty- - Anexceedingly cold day. In the morning thersecond and Federal streets, dedicated.

mometers at Germantown, Brides burg and other December 24. The Grand Jury found a true places, and in the city of Philadelphia, marked bill of indictment against all the members of Com- the degree of cold at from ten to fifteen degrees mon Council of the city for maintaining a nuisance below zero. In some parts of Pennsylvania the in permitting Girard avenue bridge to remain open mercury sank to thirty-six degrees below zero. for travel,

February 5. Fourth annual convention of the December 26. An exceedingly cold day; great National Association for Promotion of the Insnow-storm; thermometer ranged from eiglit terests of the American Trotting Turf” met at to eleven degrees above zero; snow-drifts deep. La Pierre House. Many of the passenger railways were not able to February 6. City Councils passed an ordinance run their cars, The roof of the foundry of A appropriating $500,000 in aid of the Centennial Whitney & Sons, at Seventeenth and Willow Exposition. streets, four hundred feet long and sixty-five feet Wm. Siner, member of Common Council wide, fell in by reason of the weight of the snow; from the Sixteenth Ward, was impeached before two men were injured. Also the roof of Winch's Select Council upon the charge of keeping a gam. spike factory, corner of Canal and Pollard streets; bling-house. The impeachment was withdrawn six persons injured.

February 20, in consequence of Siner's resignation December 30. Protestant Episcopal Church having been accepted by Common Council. St. James, Hestonville, West Philadelphia, con- February 8. Indignation mecting held at Hor. secrated

ticultural Hall. Resolutions adopted against the 1873, January 5. City Councils were organized; action of the Legislature in passing the bill giving W. E. Littleton elected president of Select Coun the Union Passenger Railway Company the right cil, and A. Wilson Henszey president of Common to lay tracks on Market street from Front to Ninth. Council

February 10. Meeting of colored person, at the

Eighth Month,

AUGUST.

[1874.

Day of the Year.
Day of the Month.
Day of the Week.

MOON'S PHASES, Philadelphia.
d. k. m.

d.
(Last Quarter

4 5 46 P.M. First Quarter 20
New Moon...
11 10 59 P.M.

O Full Moon... 27

h. m.
I 52 A.M.
8 28 A.M.

PHENOMENA.

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THE SUN, THE MOON,

THE TIDES,
Philadelphia. Philadelphia.

Philadelphia.
Rises Souths Sets Rises. Souths Sets High Tide. Low Tide. (Per., id. 3h. P.M.
A.M.P.M. P.M. P.M. A.M. A.M. A.M. P.M.A.M. P.M. (Apo., 17d. 8h, A.N.

h.nr. m. s.h.m. h. m. h. m. h. m. d. h. m. h. m. h. m. h. m. ( Per., 29d. 7h. A.M. 213 IS 4 59 6 27 13 935 2 52 8 44 19 4 4

4 26 11 23 11 45 6.5 9.25 P.M. 4 sets. 214 2S 4 59 5 58 7 12 10 o 3 40 9 57 20 4 48 5 10

7
6.
.4

4.31 A.M. Pol. N. 215 3 M 5 o 5 53 7

10 26 4 29 11 10 21 5 33 5 55 O 29 o 52 6.2 8.33 A.M. 8 h O. 216 4 Tu 5 1 5 48 7 10 10 55 5 19 0 23 22

6
19

6
44 I 14
1 38 6.0

7.26 P.M. Ostal. 5 2 5 42 7 8 11 29 6 II 1 39 23 7 II 741 2 31 2 30 5.7

0.28 A.M. Arct. sets, 218 Ő Th 5 3 5 36

7 A.M.

7 62 53 24 815 8 51 3 0 3 34 5.4 4.58 A.M. W south. 219 7 F 5 45

6 O IO 8

4 4 325 9 28 10 3! 4 10 4 47 5.3 11.41 P.M. Ant. sets, 220 8S 5 5

5 1 9 3 5 6 26 10 38 11 12 5 22 5 57 5.6 11.43 P.M. south. 221 9 S 5 6 4 2 O 10 I 5 58 27 11 44

6 31 7 3 5.7 8.47 P.M. sets. 22210 M 5

2
8
3 6 10 57 6 40 28

0 39

7 32 7 58 6.0 10.12 P.M. . 5 4 56 1 4 14 11 49 7 14 29 I I I 23 6 20 8 42 6.2 5.53 A.M. Ó HC. 224 12 W 5 9 4 46 5 21 o 37 7 42 1 I 43 2 5 9 2 9 24 6.3 7.03 P.M. Š X . 225 13 Th 5 10 4 36 6 26

1 21 6

2 25 ? 43 9 44 10 2 6.4 9.01 A.M. O gr.el. W. 226 14 F 5 10 4 25 6

57 7 29 2 3 8 27 3 3 2 3 21 10 21 10 40 6.5 3.40 A.M. & rises. 227 15 S 5 II 4 14 6 56

8 47 4 3 38 3 56 10 57 11 15 6.5 8.20 A.M. Ó 2 C. 228 16S

5 12 4 2 6 55 9 28 3 22 9 6 5 4 12 4 31 11 31 11 50 6.5 10.38 P.M. 9 in. 229 17 M 5131 3 49 6 53 10 271 4 I

9 27 6

4 49 5 8 o 816.4 10.25 P.M. 9 in 22. 2318 Tu 5 141 3 36 6 52 11 28 4 43 9 51 7 5 26 5 45 0 27 O 45 6.3 3.25 A.M. Ó H. 231 19

W
5 15 3 23 6 51 O 30 5 27 10 18 8

6 5 6 26 1 4 1 246.1 8.32 P.M. sets. 232 20 Th 5 16 3 9 49 1 33 6 15 10 51 9

6 50 7 15
145 2

7.16 P.M. oc. Ó Scor. 5 17 2 54 6 48 2 37 7 6 11 32 10 7 44 8 15

2 34
3 3 5.6

2.55 A.M. O H . 5 18 2 39

46 3 39

8 1 A.M. 11 8 51 9 26 3 34 4 10 5.3 4.57 P.M. Óu. 235 23 S 5 19 2 24 45 4 35 8 59 0 23 12

9 59 10 33 4 45

5 18 5.4 8.08 P.m. h sets. 236 24 M 15 20 8

43 5 24 9 57 I 25 13 11 6 1 39 5 52 24 5.7 8.21 P.M. Arct, sets. 237 25 Tu 5 21 1 52 6 42 6 6 10 54 2 35 14

o
9 6 58

28 5.8

1.29 P.M. Óhe 5 22 I 356 40 6 40 11 49 350 15

o

...... A.M. 4 gr. 1. 1. N. 239 27 Th 5 23

1 18 6 39
7 9 AM 5 7 16

I 23 1 45 8 42 9 4 6.2 10.23 P.M. h south. 5 24 1 1

37 7 36 o 42 6 24 17 2 9 2 31 9 28 9 50 6,4 1.57 A.M. oc. W Aq. 241 29 S 5 25 O 436 36 8 2 I 32

7 40 18
2 54 3 17 10 13 10 36 6.5

8.16 P.M. sets. 242 30 S 5 26 o 25 6 34

8 28 2 23 8 55 19 3 38 4 1 10 57 11 20 6.5 7:56 P.M. Vega S. 243 31 M 15 271 6 6 33 8 56 3 13 10 11 20 4 24 4 48 11 43 6.5 5.47 A.M. O a. AUGUST.

It strikes out bold and quick. Its rhetoric is not On the 20th the occultation of & Scorpii, 342 so trenchant as that of Russell Jarvis, when he magnitude, takes place at 7.16 P.M., about half an took “the bull by the horns,"lwenty and twentyhour after sunsei, while the Moon is near the five years ago, and when he stirred the sensibilmeridian. The emersion takes place at 8.42 P.M. ities of the medical students and the pro-slavery

On the morning of the 13th, Mercury reaches mobs; but it is more effective, because more modits greatest distance west of the Sun. It will rise erate.-Col. Forney's Anecdotes of Public Men. on that day at 3.40 A.M., about 250 north of east.

On the 12th, Jupiter and Venus may be seen within ° of each other, and their combined light

GREAT CITIES. and beauty will no doubt attract much attention. PHILADELPHIA is the twelfth city in the world The Moon will be

in the number of its inhabitants, and the first in 7° 11' north of Mercury on the roth. the number of conveniences which it offers to all 4° 2' north of Mars on the roth.

classes of working people. The population of 1° 19' north of Jupiter on the 15th.

London is estimated at 3,252,000; of Paris 1,684,2° 15' north of Venus on the 15th.

000; of Pekin 1,648,000; of Jeddo 1,554,000; of 4° 17' south of Saturn on the 25th. Canton 1,236,000; of Constantinople 1,075,000;

of Calcutta 1,000,000; of New York 942,292 ; of In a sketch like this I have no space to do more Berlin 828,000; of Vienna 825,000; of Bombay than allude to the Ledger under the management 816,000, and of Philadelphia 726,144. Of the of Mr. Childs, to the palace, which cost, with thirty-five cities of the world having over 300,000 the ground, over $300,000, in which he prints and inhabitants, six are in China, five in the United publishes it, and to his circulation of 85,000 copies States-viz.: New York, Philadelphia, Brooklyn, a day. But there is one aspect that must not be St. Louis and Chicago-five in Great Britain, four omitted as I close these Anecdotes.. I mean the in India, three in France, three in Japan, and perfect independence of the paper in regard to local and general corruptions. li does not hesitate. Siam, Brazil, Spain and Egypt.

one each in Turkey, Prussia, Austria, Russia,

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