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Day of the Year. | Day of the Month.

Day of the Week.

PHENOMENA.

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THE SUN, THE MOON,

THE TIDES,
Philadelphia Philadelphia.

Philadelphia.
Rises Souths Sets Rises
. Souths Sets. Ligh Tide.

Low Tide.

(Apo., 8d, roh. P.M. A.M. P.M. P.M. P.M.P.M.

A.M.

A.M. P.M. A.M. P.M. hm, a. s.h.m. h. m. h. m. h. mn. d. h. m. h. m. h. m. h. m.

(Per., 2od. 3h. P. M. 1

1 Th 7 23 3 59 4 45 3 34 11 33 6 30 13 0 19 0 46 7 38 8 5 6.0 9.23 A.M. O in Per. 2 F

7 23 4 27 4 46 4 32 AM 7 32 14 I 9 1 34 8 28 8 53 6.2 5.20 A.M. 4 south, 3 35 7 23 4 55 4 47 5 35 0 30 8 24 15 1 58 2 23 917 9 42 6.4 6.34 A.M. Y rises. 4.S 7 23 5 22 4 48

1 24 9 6 16 2 46 3 910 5 10 28 6.5 5.42 A.M. $ 5 5 M 7 23 5 49 4 49 7 451 2 14 9 39 17 3 30 3 52 10 49 11 11 6.5 11.42 P.M. oc, n Leo. 66 Tu 7 23 6 14 4 508 47 3 1 10 7 18 4 12 4 32 11 31 II 51 6.5

7.07 A.M. W station. W 7 23 6 40 4 51 948 344 10 30 19 4 51 5 10

o 10 6.4 / 10.53 P.M. 3 Th

4 rises.

5 29 5 47 o 29 0 48 6.3 11.02 P. M. 04 (. 9 9 F 7 22 7 31 4 53 11 45 5 4 11 12 21 6 4 6 23 1 6 1 23 6.1 6.21 P.M. south. 10 10/S 7 22 7 55 4 54 A.M. 5 43 11 32 22

6 42 7 2 1 52 2 15.9 5.50 A.M. Oc. a Virg. II US 7 22 8 19 4 55 O45 6 23 11 5423 7 23 7 49 2 21

2 42 5.7

9.04 P.M. Ald. south. 12 12 M 7 22 8 42 4 56 1 467 56 0 17 24

8 151 8 43

8 3 34 5.5

8.48 P.M. d sets. 13/13 Tu 7 21 9 5 4 57 2 49

8
046 25

9 14 9 43 4 2 4 33 5.3 5.40 P.M. Polaris N. 14 14 W

9 27 4 58 3 56 8 42 1 22 26 10 13 10 46 5 2 5 32 5.4 10.26 P.M. 4 rises. 15 15 Th 7 21 9 48 4 59 5 4 9 37 2

627 11 17 11 49

9.26 r.m. Capella N. 16 16 F 7 20 10 9.5 o 6 10 10 36 3

1 28
o 9 7

7 38 5.9

4.07 P.M. 2 station, 17 17 S 7 20 10 29 5 1 7 9 11 37 4

O 47 I 14 8 6 8 33 6.1 6.30 A.M.O. 18 18 S 7 20 10 48 5 2 8 o 38 5 22 1 40 2 17 8 59 9 26 6.3 11.28 A.M. 3 ho. 19 19 M 7 19 11 75 31 8

42 1 37 6 40 1

2 32 2 58 9 51 10 17 6.5 9.11 P.M. Rigel S. 20 20 Tu 7 19 11 24 5

411 9 16

2 32 7 582 3 23 3 46 10 42 11 5 6.5 10.40 P.M. Sirius S. 21 21 W 7 18 11 41 5 5 9 46 3 24 9 13 3 4 10 4 33 11 29 11 52 6.5 6.32 A.M.O. 22 22 Th 7 17 11 57 5 6 10 12

4 14 10 26
4 4 56 5 19

0 15 6.4 2.23 P.M.000. 7 17 12 13 5 7 10 37 5 2 11 38 5 5 41 2

o 6.2

8.47 P.M. sets. 24/24 S 7 16 12 27 5 9 11 31 5 51 A.M.

66 26
50 I 21

9.46 P.M. 4 rises, 25 25 S 7 15 12 41 5 10 11 31 6 41 0 50 7 7 76

46 2 9

2 35 5.7 0.01 A.M. Óh O. 26 26 M 7 15 12 53 5 II 41 7 34 2 3

8 8

17 50 351 3 36 5.4 8.44 P.M. Rigel S. 27 27 Tu 7 14 13 6 5 12 O 42 8 29 3 14 9 9 26 9 58 4 9 4 45 5.3 8.01 P.M. Ald. south. 28 28 W 7 13 13 17 5 13 1 28 9 25 4 23 10 10 30 11 45 17 5 49 5.5 9.17 P.M. Ó Oh. 29 29 Th 7 12 13 28 5 15 2 22 10 21 5 25 11 11 36

6 23 6 55 5.7 8.31 P.M. Capella N. 30 30 7 11 13 37 5 16 3 23 11 16 6 18 12

0 5
0 31 7 24 7 50 5.9

9.59 P.M. Sirius S. 31131 S 7 10 13 46 5 171 4 27

7 313 o 551 1 171 6 14 8 3616.2 3.18 A.M. Oh. ASTRONOMICAL INFORMATION, Etc. Chronological Cycles.

Abbreviations.
Dominical Letter .......

D
2 Ascending node.

0 Degrees. Epact.

12

Minutes of arc. Lunar Cycle....

13
Descending node.

h. Hours. Solar Cycle......

7
N. North. S. South.

m. Minutes of time. Roman Indiction.

2

E. East. W. West. s. Seconds of time. Julian Period...

6587
Signs of the Planets.
The Sun.
Mars.

JANUARY
The Moon.

24 Jupiter. Mercury.

There are two fine occultations this month: Saturn.

The first, an occultation of n Leonis, a star of Venus.

Ô or Uranus. or $ The Earth.

the 3 magnitude, on the 5th, at 11,42 P.M. The

Neptune. emersion at the dark limb of the Moon takes place Signs of the Zodiac,

at 0.53 A.M. on the 6th. p Aries.

The second, an occultation of e Virgines, a star

- Libra. 8 Taurus.

of the 4'2 magnitude, on the roch, at 5.50 A.M. m Scorpio.

The emersion takes place at 7.01 A.M., about O Gemini.

I Sagittarius. Cancer.

Capricornus.

twenty minutes before sunrise, the Moon being

near the Meridian,

Aquarius. it Virgo.

The Moon will be # Pisces.

2° 12' north of Jupiter on the 8th. Aspects.

3° 10' south of Mercury on the 16th. Conjunction, having the same) Longitude or 4° 6' south of Venus on the 16th. 0 Quadrature, differing 900 in Right As. 8 Opposition, differing 180° in

36' south of Saturn on the 17th. cension.

45' south of Mars on the 20th.

+CAO

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sons.

THE CITY OF HOMES.

12,302 cows, 210,276 hogs and 749,500 sheep. In

addition, the farmers brought to their markets At the beginning of the year 1873 there were in immense supplies of food, such as becf, veal, mutthe city of Philadelphia 134,740 buildings of all ton, pork, poultry, game, venison, butter, cheese, kinds. Of these 124,302 were dwelling-houses or vegetables, the amount of which, with other artiresidences of families, some of them being also cles, such as oysters, clams, lobsters, fish, etc., sed in part for store or manufacturing purposes. cannot be ascertained. The dwelling-houses exceed in number those in any They were accommodated in their local travel other city in the United States. They were 60,258 by means of street passenger railways operated more than there were in New York city in 1870, by fifteen incorporated companies, and extending when the relative number of dwelling-houses were, over 212 miles of railway, which ran thereon New York, 64,044, Philadelphia, 112,366. They daily 794 cars drawn by 4860 horses. These roads were 78,468 more than there were in Brooklyn in had' carried during the previous year 66,781,456 1870, and 84,627, more than in St. Louis, 83,952 passengers, who paid for that service, in fares, more than in Baltimore, 79,682 more than in $4,107,980,69. The feed for the horses on these Chicago, 94,679 more than in Boston, and 99,752 railways during the previous year required 13,281 more than in Cincinnati in the same year. They tons of hay, and 474,352 bushels of corn, with oats, were more than in New York and Brooklyn com- etc., not ascertained. bined in that year. They were only 16 less than the In the preceding year the deaths in the city were whole combined number of dwelling-houses in Bal. 18,987, of which 2585 were from small-pox, a distimore, St. Louis, Boston and Louisville in 1879. ease which was in that year throughout the United They were 658 more than there were altogether in States a contagious epidemic, which commenced the same year in San Francisco, Cal., Washington, its ravages in 1871. In the year 1870 the whole D.C., Cleveland, Ohio, Providence, R.I., New number of deaths by that disease in Philadelphia Haven, Conn., Albany, N. Y., Charleston, S.C., were 9, and in 1869 but 6. Of the whole number Mobile, Ala., Richmond, Va., Savannah, Ga., of deaths in 1872,9154, or 44.55 per cent. of the Portland, Me., and Wilmington, Del.

whole, were of children under 5 years of age, and Ar the ratio established in 1870 for dwellings in 9936, or 48.35 per cent., of children under 10 Philadelphia, viz.,5.99 (the Compendium of United years of age. The proportion of deaths to popuStates census by an error makes it 6.01), there lation (exclurling still-born cases, say 18,987 deaths were residing in those dwelling-houses, in the to 726,144 persons) was one death in 38.24. Taking beginning of 1873, at least 726,144 persons, com- off the loss by epidemicsmall-pox as an exceptional bined, according to the ratio of same census (5.28 mortality, the ratio was one death to 44.21 perper family), in 137,527 families.

Death rate per 1000 was 26.01, and exThe city in which this population lived had an cluding epidemic small-pox deaths, 22.61 per 1000. area of 120 square miles. There were 9.po miles of According to the returns of the English registrarstreets and roads opened for the use of the inhabit. general lately made, the annual death rate per 1000 ants, of which more than 500 miles were paved, in the principal cities of the world is as follows: and lighted by 9023 public lamps, all of which

London ....

...22.7 except 14 were lighted with gas.

Paris.

....24.4 They were supplied with water by five prin

Brussels.

..26.5 cipal water-works, having means of filling seven Berlin storage reservoirs. During the previous year

.29.9 Vienna.

..34.4 13,100,013,461 U. S. gallons of water had been

Rome. furnished them, the number of houses receiv

Florence ing water by this source being 120,516, in which

Turin....

30.4 there were 34,222 bath-rooms, most of them furnished with hot water, being a larger pro.

Bombay.

..27,6

Madras. portion of baths to dwellings than any New York.

....30,1 other city in the world. 15,913 wash-stands, water-closets, etc., were supplied by the works. The people of Philadelphia worshiped God in Water was also supplied to 4496 fire-plugs. for over 400 churches, meeting-houses and synathe extinguishment of fires, and 54 public drink- gogues, which furnished sittings for not less than ing fountains. The water was supplied to them 350,000 persons. from more than 546 miles of street service mains. For the education of their children there were For this necessary supply they paid to the wa- | 396 public schools of all grades, valued, with ter department in water rents, at low rates, buildings, lots and furniture, at $4,272,284. In $1,043,613.11.

these schools there were 1630 teachers and 84,387 They were furnished with light at night by five pupils. The cost of maintaining them for the principal manufacturing gas-works, which had previous year had been $1,381,460.54. There were during the preceding year made altogether 1,559,; also a large number of seminaries, academies and 519,000 cubic feet of gas. This gas was supplied private schools, which were attended by many to and ready for use in 1,020,401 burners. The thousand children, and also collegiate institutions number of private consumers of gas were 79,410, for the higher branches of education, science, and the greater proportion of the gas was used in theology, etc. private dwelling-houses. The street mains laid Taking as a basis the industrial returns of 1870, down to furnish the gas extended 6022 miles. according to special report to City Councils in 1872, This gas was sold to consumers at the average that in the former year the total value of Philadelprice of $2,25 per 1000 cubic feet.

phia manufactures was $334,852,458, being more Vast quantities of provisions were necessary i than $12,000,000 in excess of United States census for their sustenance. There were furnished to them returns, and estimating the increase at the ratio by their butchers in the public markets during the i for the preceding ten years--there were in Philapreceding year the flesh of 134,850 bullocks, delphia in 1873 about 8650 manufacturing estab

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Second Month,]

FEBRUARY.

(1874.

Day of the Year.
Day of the Month.
Day of the Week.

High Tide.

A.M.

32 IS

2 21

W 7

8 37

8 55 17

37 6 F

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42 11 W

44 13 F 45 14 S

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MOON'S PHASES, Philadelphia,
d. h. m.

d. h. m.
O Full Moon... 1 6 35 A.M.

New Moon... 16 2 14 P.M. (Last Quarter 9 11 28 A.M. D First Quarter 23

PHENOMENA.

5 44 A.M.
THE SUN, THE MOON,

THE TIDES,
Philadelphia,
Philadelphia.

Philadelphia.
Rises Souths Sets Rises. Souths Sets.

Low fide.

Apo., 5d. 4h. P.M. A.M. P.M. P.M. P.M. A.M. A.M. A.M. P.M.

P.A. (Per., 17d. 7h. P.M. h.m. m. s.h.m. h. m. h. m. n, m. d. hm. h. m. h. m.,. m.

7 9 13 545 18 5 32 0 7 7 38 14 1 38 1 59 8 57 9 186.3 8.46 P.M. sets. 33 2 M 7 8 14 15 20 6 361 o 55 8 8 15

2 40 940

9 59 6.4 8.16 P.M. Rigel S. 34 3 Tu z 8 14 215 21 7 37 139 8 33 16 2 59

3 18 10 18 10 37 6.5 9.13 A.M. Ở . 35 6 14 12 5 22

2 21

3 37 3 54 10 56 11 13 6.5 6.40 P.M. 7 * S. 36 5 Th 7 5 14 18 5 23 9 351 3 1 9 15 18

4 12 4 30 11 31 11 49 6.5 2.49 A.M. O 4 (. 7 4 14 21 5 251 10 34 3 30 9 35 19 4 48 5 6

o 7 6.4 8.47 P.M. 4 rises. 38 7 S 17 3 14 24.5 26 11 34 4 19 9 56 20

5 23

5 42 0 25 42 6.3 1.14 P.M. 9 in Aph. 39 8S 17 2 14 275 27A.M. 5 0 10 18 21 6 0 6 22

I 196.1 7.13 P.M. Ald. S. 40 9 M 17 1 14 28 5 28 O 36 5 43 10 44 22 6 431 7 7 I 41

2 25.9

3.54 P.M. Polaris N. 41 10 Tu 7 0 14 295 29 I 39 6 30 11 16 23 7 33

8
2 2 26 2 525.6

4.06 A.M. h rises, 6 59 14 29.5 31 2 46 7 22 II 56 24 8 35 9 10 3 21 3 545.3 7.40 P.M. Capel. N. 43 12 Th 6 57 14 28 5 32 3 53 8 18 0 45 25 9 44 10 20 4 291 5 215.4

6.08 P.M. 7* S. 6 56 14 275 33

4 53 9 18

1 44 26 10 55 11 30 5 39 6 14 5.6 1.59 A.M. Ald. sets. 6 55 14 25 15 34 5 47 10 19 2 54 27

2 6 49

21 5.8 8.45 P.M. o sets. 46 15 S 6 53 14 22 5 35 6 33 11 19

4 12 28

o 581 7 50 6.1 3.20 A.M. Óh (. 47 16 M 6 52 14 18 5 36 7 11

O 17 5 31 29 1 22 I 47 8 41 6.6.3 9.09 A.M. O 9. 4817 Tu 6 50 14 14 5 38 7 43 1 12 6 50 1 2 12

2 361 9 31
9 556.4

6.56 A.M. Ó O C. 49 18 W 6 50 14 9 5 39

8 12 2 4 8 7 2 2 58 3 22 10 17 10 41 6.5 7.55 P.M. 4 rises. 50 19 Th 6 48 14 3 5 40 8 38 2 55 923 3 3 44 4 7 11 3 11 26 6.5 3.52 AM. ở q. 6 47 13 57 5 41 9 5 3 45 10 38 4 4 30 4 52 II 49

0.28 P.M.O.C. 52 21S

6 46 13 49 5 42 9 23 4 37 11 42 5 5 16 5 40 0 11 o 35 6.3 3.29 A.M, h rises. 6 44 13 42 5 43 10 4 5 30 A.M.

6 6 3 6 29 o 59

122 6.1 11.54 P.M. $9. 54 23 M 6 43 13 335 44 10 41 6 25 1 5 7 6 54 7 25

I 48 2 1315.8

7.28 A.M. 09 o sup. 55 24 Tu 6 41 13 24 5 46 11 25 7 21 2 16 8

7 59

8

33 2 44 3 18 5.5 8.43 P.M. sets. 040 13 15,5 47

0 17 8 17

3 20 9 9 9 9 43 3 52 4 28 5.3 8.17 P.M. Sirius sets. 57 26 Th 6 38 13 45 48 I 10 9 12 4 16 10 10 17 10 48 5 5 36 5.5

7.19 P.M. 24 rises. 58 27 F

6 37 12 53 5 49 2 14 10 3 5 3 11 11 18 11 461 6 71 6 37 5.7 1.48 P.M. & in Per. 16 35 12 42 5 5oll 3 23 10 52 5 45 12

O 11 7 5 7 305.8 0.23 A.M. OHI. ECLIPSES IN 1874.

north. This Eclipse will be best seen in Westeru In the year 1874 there will be four Eclipses, two Asia, and will be partly visible in Europe, a porof the Sun and two of the Moon, and a transit of

tion of Africa and in Greenland. Venus over the Sun's disk.

IV. A Total Eclipse of the Moon, October The Total Eclipse of the Moon on the 24th and 24th and 25th, 1874, visible in Philadelphia, will 25th of October will be visible at midnight in commence October 24, 11.43 P.M., Philadelphia Philadelphia. The Eclipses in order are as fol- time. The following are the times of the various lows:

phases of the Eclipse : I. A Total Eclipse of the Sun, April 16, 1874, Moon enters Penumbra Oct. 24, 11.43 P.M. begins on the Earth 6.47 A.M., Philadelphia time, Moon enters Shadow

25, 0.41 A.M. in longitude 6° 52' east from Washington, and lat.

Total Phase begins

25, 1.59 AM itude 58° 33' south, and ends in longitude 1920 24' Middle of the Eclipse 25,

2.16 A.M. east from Washington, and in latitude 6° 13' south.

Total Phase ends

25, 2.32 A.M. This Eclipse will be total near the Cape of Good

Moon leaves Shadow

25,

3.51 A.M. Hope, Africa, and will be partly visible over the

Moon leaves Penumbra

25, 4.48 A.M. southern half of Africa and over a narrow strip of land in the southern and south-eastern part of

FEBRUARY. South America.

II. A Partial Eclipse of the Moon, chiefly vis- During this month the Moon will be ible in the Pacific Ocean, begins in longitude 1400

50' north of Jupiter on the 5th. so' west of Washington, May 1, 1874, at 8.07 A.M.,

40' south of Saturn on the 15th. Philadelphia time, and ends in longitude 171° 25' 3° 43' south of Venus on the 16th. east of Washington at 9:56 A.M., Philadelphia 3° 36' south of Mercury on the 17th. time. Both beginning and ending are between 2° 29' south of Mars on the 19th. 150 and 16° south of the Equator.

111. An Annular Eclipse of the Sun, October The Philadelphia Ledger is one of our valued 10, begins 3:47 A.M., Philadelphia time, in longi- exchanges, and its money article in particular is tude 47° 13' cast of Washington and in latitude always well written, and is received in all parts of 66° 33' north, and ends 8.37 A.M. in longitude 1370, the world as very high authority.-New York 56' east of Washington, and in latitude 10° 49' Journal of Commerce.

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lishments, having a capital of $185,000,000, em- low fever monument to volunteer nurses who died ploying 145,000 hands, the annual value of the at Norfolk, Va., in 1855, North Laurel Hill.products of which was at least $384,000,000. Gen. Hugh Mercer of the Revolution, tomb and

During the customs revenue year ending June monument, North Laurel Hill. --Thos. McKean, 9, 1873, there were exported from the port to for- signer of Declaration of Independence, monument eign countries merchandise valued at $24,203,125. and tomb, North Laurel Hill.--Chas. Thomson, There were imported articles valued at $26,824,- Secretary of the Continental Congress, monument 333. The amount paid for duties on imported and tomb, North Laurel Hill. Julius R. Friedgods was $8,476,594.15 in gold.

lander, founder of the Pennsylvania Institution for The valuation of real estate for taxable purposes the Intruction of the Blind, monument and tomb, at the asses-ment of 1873 was $518,234,568. There Laurel Hill.-David M. Lyle, monument by Fire were collected during 1872 upon account of current | Department, tomb and marble statue, Old Oaks and delinquent taxes $8,993,198. The total expen. cemetery.-Fireman, marble statue by Battin, ditures of the city for 1872, exclusive of interese paid Odd Fellows' cemetery.-Fred. Graff, inemorial on loans, were $7,726,123. The funded debt Jan- monument and bust, marble, Fairmount Park.wary, 1873, including gas loans, was $51,697,- Wm. B. Schneider, monument and tomb erected 147.67.

by Masonic order, Mount Moriah cemetery: During the year 1872 there were 701 fires in the Wm. Curtis, tomb and monument by 1.0.0. F., city, by which the losses were $2,334:405. The Mount Peace cemetery--Com. Stephen Decatur, insurances on some of the property destroyed monument and tomb, St. Peter's churchyard, amounted to $6,589,319, being three times more Third and Pine. ---David Rittenhouse, astronothan the total luss, but the same not being for the mer, signer of Declaration of Independence, monbenefit of the persons who met with losses but ument and tomb, churchyard Third Presbyterian were not insured.

Church, Fourth and Pine sts.--Com. Hull, monFor purposes of health and recreation there were ument and tomb, South Laurel Hill, -Alexander ready for their use ten parks and public squares. Wilson, ornithologist, tomb, Old Swedes' Church Fairmount Park, the largest of these, contains 2991 ground, Swanson st. below Christian, acres, exceeding in size any similar enclosure in the United Staics, and being exceeded only by The Public Ledger is a Philadelphia instituthree public parks in Europe. This park was tion. Its commencement marked an epoch in our enjoyed in 1872 by 1,783,225 pedestrians, 395,411 local history : in its progress it has been identified vehicles and 26,550 equestrians, showing, accord- with all our local movements. At the outset it ing to estimate, that in that time the park was

was a startling novelty; now it is a recognized visited by 2,969,458 persons.

necessity. How well I remember when the first

number that was issued made its appearance ! MONUMENTS, TOMBS AND STATUES Though diminutive in size, it was, as the fac

OF A PUBLIC CHARACTER IN PHIL- simile shows, a creditable journal from the beginADELPHIA.

ning, alike in its mechanical execution and liter.

ary contents. And well it might be. Its publishPenn Treaty Monument, Beach st., near Pal- ers were three printers unusually skilled in all mer.-William Penn statue, lead, Pennsylvania that belonged to their calling; its editor was a Hospital. - Benj. Franklin statue, marble, Phila- scholar of wide culture, a keen and bright obserdelphia Library building, Fifth and Library sts.- ver, and a writer of uncommon fluency and force. Benj. Franklin statue, stone, by Bailly, Ledger Until Mr. Childs became its purchaser, two of its building: --Benj. Franklin statue, marble, by Bat-original proprietors continued to be its owners ; tin, Odd Fellows' cemetery,- Benj. Franklin's until the death of its original editor, he continued comb, Christ Church burying-ground, south side to contribute to its columns This permanence of Arch street, east of Filth ; visible from the was and is characteristic of the Ledger. The street.-—Stephen Girard mausoleum and marble men who devised in, like the man who now constatue by Gevelot, Girard College.- Robt. Morris' ducts it, were wise and farsighted, and they laid tomb, Christ Church crypt, Second st., above its foundation on an enduring basis. They inMarket.-Washington and Lafayette monument, tended it should last; and not allowing any temgranite and bronze, Monument cemetery - Wash- porary inducements to swerve them from their ington statue, marble, by J. A. Bailly, Chestnut purpose, they persevered until it was accomplishst., in front of Independence Hall.-Washington ed. And it is a striking example of what patient statue, wood, by Wm. Rush, Independence Hall. application intelligently directed can do, ihat an -Sir Walter Scott and Old Mortality group, stone, apparently hopeless undertaking, begun with limby James Thom, Laurel Hill. --Abraham Lincoln ited means, under serious disadvantages, has, monument and statue, bronze, by Randolph Rog- within the memory of many of us, largely enrichers, Fairmount Park. -Night, statue, bronze, ed its projectors, and that the little obscure office George's Hill, Fairmount Park.-Hudson Bay in the old Arcade has been replaced by the palawolves quarreling, group, bronze, Lansdowne tial establishment, so vast in its design, so subdrive, Fairmount Park. --Soldiers' monument, stantial in its structure, so ornate in its embellishScott Legion, Glenwood cemetery.--Soldiers' ments and so perfect in its appointments. For monument, Cedar Hill cemetery, 23d Ward. -Sol- this we are indebted to the munificence of Mr. diers' monument and statue, bronze, Girard College Childs; and while we of Philadelphia are under ground.-Washington Grays' soldiers' monument, especial obligations for the beautiful edifice thus Girard av, and Broad st. -Soldiers' monument to added to our city, his brethren of the press every. Virginia troops killed in Revolutionary war, Le- where owe him gratitude and praise for the cosily yerington cemetery, Roxboro'.-Thos. Godfrey, monument he has reared to the dignity, importinventor of the mariners' quadrant, monument, ance and value of our profession.- Hon. Morton North Laurel Hill.-John Fitch, inventor of the Mc Michael, Editor of North American and U.S. steamboat, monument, North Laurel Hill.-Yel- | Gazette, Philadelphia.

Third Month)

MARCH.

[1874.

Day of the Year.
Day of the Month.
| Day of the Week.

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MOON'S PHASES, Philadelphia,
d. h. m.

d. k. m.
O Full Moon... 3 O 20 A.M.

New Moon... 18 O I A.M.
(Last Quarter II
4 33 A.M. > First Quarter 24 5 30 P.M.

PHENOMENA.
THE SUN, THE MOON,

THE TIDES,
Philadelphia. Philadelphia.

Philadelphia,
Rises Souths Sets Rises. Souths Sets. High Tide. Low Tide.

(Apo., 4d. 15h. P.M. A.M. P.M. P.M. A.M. P.M. A.M. - A.M P.M.A.M. P.M.

Per., 18d, ohA.M. h.m. m. s.h.m.h.m. h. m. h. m. d. h. m. h. m. h. m. h. m. 60 IS 6 34 12 30 5 51 4 26 11 36 6 1 13 341 O 54 7 53 8 13 6.0

7.24 P.M. & sets W. 61 2 M 16 32 12 18 5 52

5 30 A.M.
6 37 14 I 13

I 30

8 49 6.2 0.40 P.M. 0 Elong W. 62 3 Tu 6 31 12 5 5 53

6 28
o 19 7 0115

2 7 9 8 9 26 6.3 7. OP.M. 4 rises, 63 4W 6 29 11 52 5 54 7 27 O 591 7 20 16

2 25
2 42 9 44 10

1 6.4

7.15 A.M. 5 20. 64 5 Th 6 28 11 38 5 56 8 25 I 38 40 17 2 58 317 10 17 10 36 6.5 7:46 P.M. Sirius S. 651 6 F 6 26 11 24 5 57

9 25 2 17 8 018
3 33 3 50 10 5211

9 6.5

8.41 P.M. dsets, 66 7S 6 25 11 05 58 10 26 2 57 8 21 19

4 9 4 29 11 28 11 48 6.5 0.31 A.M. Ald. sets. 67 8s 6 23 10 54 6 0 1 29 3 39 8 46 20

4 48 5 9

7 6.4 10.52 P.M. & Station. 689 M 6 21 10 39 6 1 A.M 4 24 9 14 21 5 29 5 51 o 28 0 48 6.3

8.23 P.M. Proc. S. 69 10 Tu 6 20 10 23 6 o 33

5 13 9 49 22

6 39 IYO I 33 6.0 4.30 A.M. h rises. 70 HW 6 18 10 76 2 1 371 6 6 10 32 23 7 6

7 37 1 58 2 25 5.7 | 10.43 P.M. Reg. S. 7112 Th 6 17 9 51 6 3 2 39 7 2 11 26 24 8 11 8 49 2 56 3 30 5.4

9.16 P.M. H South. 72/13 F

6 15
9 34 6
4

O 30 25 9 26 10 4 8 4 45 5.3 6.15 P.M. 4 rises. 16 14

4 24 9 1 43 26 10 35 11 9 5 21 5 54 5.5 6.41 P.M. Óhe. 74 15 S 6 12 5 4 9 58 3 0 27 11 41

6 27 7 0 5.7 0 37 AM. 6 7 8. 75 16 M 6 10

5 39 10 54

9 0 36 7 28 7 55 6.0 8.39 P.M. sets. 7617 Tu6 81 8 6 9 11 48 5 28 29

1 22 6 18 8 41 6.2 9.37 A.M. 8 24 0 77 18W 6

7
8 8

6 0 40 6 56 1 2 8 9 3 9 27 6.3 8.29 A.M. O . 78 19 Th 6 5 7 50 7 2 1 32 8 14 2

2 30 2 53 9 49 10 12 6.5 11.37 P.M. W.6. 6 3 7 326 12

7 30 2 25 9 32 3 3 17 3 40 10 36 10 59 6.5 1.37 P.M. Spr.* beg. 80 21 S

6
2 7 14 6 13 8 1

3 19 10 49 4 4 4 4 30 11 23 II 49 6.5 6.43 P.M. Sirius S. 81 22 S 6 o 6 56 6 14 8 37 4 16 A.M. 5 4 55 5 20

0 14 6.4 11.26 P.M. Ald, sets. 82 23 M 5 58 6 38 6 15

5 14 4

6
5 47 6 14 O 39 I

6 6.2

8.31 P.M. H south, 83 24 Tu 5 57

19
6 16 10 10
6 i
7 6 42

I 33
2

3:39 A.M. h rises, 84 25 W 5 55 16 17 1 8 7 7 2 13 8 7 42 8 16

2 31 3 15.6 11.33 P.M. south. 85 26 Th 5 54 O 10 8 0 3 3 9 8 51 9 25 3 35 4 TO 5.3

6.54 P.M. sets. 86 27 F 5 52 5 24 6 19 1 15 8 50 3 43 10 9 54 10 22 4 44 5 13 5.4 4.40 A.M. OHG. 87 28 S 5 50 55 620 2 19 9 35 4 15 11 10 50 II 15 5 41 6 9 5.6

8.43 P.M. oc. 7 Leo. 88 29 S 5 49 4 47 6 21 3 21 10 18

4 42 12 11 39

6
34

6
58 5:7

8.36 P.M. sets, 89 30 M 5 47

28. 6 22 4 21 10 58 5 5 13 I O 21 720 40 5.9 7. OP.M. Proc. S. 90131 Tu 5 461 4 10 23 5 2011 38 5 26 14 o 40 o 571 7 591 8 16 6.1 6.4 A,M. Ở 4 (. MARCH.

ordinary purposes. An ordinary surveyor's level A fine occultation of

will give the horizon where the upper edge of the Leonis, 3% magnitude,

takes place at 8.43 P.M. on the 28th. The emer

sun should be at the time given in the almanac. sion will be at 9.19 P.M.

If the telescope of the leveling instrument inverts, On the 2d, Mercury reaches its greatest dis

the upper edge will, of course, be apparently the tance from the Sun, and can probably be seen

lower one.

Next are given the times of rising, just before sunset.

southing and setting of the moon's centre, and The Moon will be

also its age, or the number of days elapsed since 49' north of Jupiter on the 4th.

new moon. Then follow the times of high and 46' south of Saturn on the 14th.

low water for Philadelphia. Lastly is given a 7° 23' south of Mercury on the 17th.

collection of interesting astronomical phenomena 1° 42' south of Venus on the 18th. 0° 42' south of Mars on the moth. 5' north of Jupiter on the 31st.

Mr. George W. Childs did a good work for THE EPHEMERIS.

Philadelphia when he projected the Ledger Alma

nac, and gave another evidence of liberal enterThe Ephemeris of the present year gives, as prise by distributing over one hundred thousand heretofore, the day of the year, the day of the copies gratuitously. In this, as in all matters, he month and day of the week, in civil time, accord has given practical evidence of an earnest desire ing to which the day begins at midnight. Next to increase the prosperity of our city by all legitiare given the time of sunrise, the time before or mate means. Success in business and an enviable after noon at which the sun's centre souths and reputation are his just rewards for a career that the time of sunset. The times of sunrise and sun- has benefited a large community. He has acset are in each case for the "pper limb or edge of complished the ambition of his boyhood, which the sun, corrected for refraction. They are inore was to prove “ that a man can be liberal and sucaccurate than usually found in popular almanacs, cessful at the same time."--Philudelphia Proofand will give the time with sufficient accuracy for Sheet.

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