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In 1876 the thickly-built portions of the city of peace and the protection of strangers. The exmay be said to extend from Mifflin street on the penditures of the city in 1875 were $13,446,451.73, south to Alleghany avenue on the north, and and the receipts, including a balance on hand, from the Delaware to the Schuylkill River. were $15,774,375.33, leaving a cash balance on Within these limits, from Fourth to Broad street, January 1 of $2,463.502.72.

The funded and there are miles of houses constructed as closely Hoating debt at the beginning of 1876 was $69,716,as possible, whilst from Broad street to the 524.17. The assessed value of taxable property Schuylkill, between Reed street and Columbia was $575,283,988. The amount of taxes to be avenue, there is a large number of houses, which raised on this assessment was $10,518,462.86. in some places are as closely built as in the old In addition to the means for preserving health parts of the city. It is difficult to designate ensured by a system of building which allows no those sections of Philadelphia where the urban new dwelling-house to be built upon a street of character ceases and suburban peculiarities are less than 20 feet in width and with a clear yardtaken up. The area of the city is nearly 130 square space of 12 feet square adjoining at the rear or miles, or 82,600 acres. There are about 1200 the side, together with ventilation and drainage, miles of streets opened and over 600 paved. They must be added the advantages of having cheap were lighted at the beginning of 1876 by 10,729 and nutritious food furnished by a fertile agriculpublic gas-lamps. In the houses and buildings tural country which surrounds the city, and by easy and streets there were in use 1,191,393 gas-lights, means of access from the sea-shore. Thus meats, of an average illuminating power of 16.61 candles. poultry, eggs, butter, vegetables, with fish, oysGas was also supplied by the Northern Liberty ters, game, etc., are plentiful, and are furnished in works to a considerable number of consumers. 28 market-house buildings, all of which are spaThe City and Northern Liberties gas-works manu- cious and some elegant, in addition to which factured, in 1875, 14,621,169,687 cubic feet of gas. there are 7 street markets. At the drove-yards Gas was furnished to consumers during the greater in 1875 there were sold for city consumption part of 1876 at $2.15 per 1000 cubic feet. The gas- 152,720 beeves and cows, 491,500 sheep, 243,300 mains extended 672 miles. Water was furnished hogs. In addition, farmers themselves bring meats in every house by pipes connecting with 662 miles and poultry in great abundance. Complete staof street water-mains, which were filled from seven tistics on this subject cannot be obtained, It is great reservoirs, the water being supplied from the sufficient to say that the supply is plentiful and Schuylkill and Delaware Rivers from six pumping good. The means of warming houses are enworks and stations. In 1875 the works pumped iirely changed. The Franklin fireplace and the into the reservoirs 15,097,160,067 gallons, which, in ten-plate stove, in which wood was consumed as order to show the rapid increase of consumption, fuel, have given way to appliances for the it may be noted-is more than 500,000,000 gallons burning of anthracite coal. The cooking-stove beyond the supply of the previous year.

The in the humble dwelling, the kitchen range in water was connected in the streets with 5363 fire- houses of greater pretension, and the coal stove plugs for use by engines and hose in cases of con- for use in stores and aparıments, replace the flagration. The fire department consisted of 32 old wood burning arrangements. Furnaces and companies with 34 steam fire-engines, 4 hand-en-portable heaters in the cellars warm the greater gines, 13 hose-carriages, 5 hook-and-ladder trucks, proportion of buildings of all kinds, public or the whole being worked by 389 men and 123 private, stores, factories or dwellings. The health horses. There were 74 public drinking-fountains of the population under the advantages named is In the houses the water was carried into kitchens, better than in any other city in the United States, chambers, closets and bath-rooms, the latter gen and exceeded by only one city in the world. The erally being supplied by kitchen ranges with facil number of deaths during the year 1875 was 17,805. ity to furnish warm water as well as cold. The This excludes still-born, premature births and number of baths supplied with water was 51,214, bodies brought into the ciiy for burial. Taking being a far greater number of baths than are to the population at the beginning of 1876 at the fig. be found in any other city of the world. The ure of the municipal census, the deaths amount to price of water was low, ranging from $3 for the i in every 45.09 of the population, or 22.11 for smallest dwellings up to $20 and $25 for the lar. every 1000 living persons. This is a lower rate gest houses, water in large quantities for manufac- than any other city in the world except London, tories and workshops being supplied at propor- the death-rate of that city in 1872 being 22.07, per tionate prices. The entire assessment for 1875

Paris stood at 24.4, Berlin 24.6, New York amounted to $!,025,278.50,; and according to the 30.1, Rome 32.4, Vienna 34.4, and Madras 37.6. rate of water furnished, the price paid was one The number of births in 1875 was 17,933; number cent for 147 gallops. For the relief of the inhab- of registered marriages, 6144. itants and for the benefit of health there were There were few manufactures in Philadelphia about 150 miles of sewers and culverts. Trans- at the time of the outbreak of the Revolution, portation and conveyance along the paved streets except such as were connected with absolute newere rendered more easy by the tracks laid down cessity for personal service, such as those of the by 19 horse railway companies upon 245 miles of shoemaker, hatter, tailor and weaver of homestreets. In 1875 they had in use 1056 cars, drawn by spun goods, with a few other trades, the material 6087 horses. There were carried during that year for which could not be supplied from abroad. The 85,387,337 passengers. The receipts of the horse passage of the Stamp Act first called attention railways were $5.631,316. The streets were guard- io the necessity of cncouraging American manu. ed and the peace preserved by a police force which factures. The policy of the British Parliament numbered, at the beginning of 1876, 1200 patrolmen, had been repressive of manufacture in the colo25 turnkeys, 27 lieutenants, 4 captains, a fire-mar- nies, the object being to compel the provincials to shal and a chief of police. This force was tem- rely upon British workmen for all sorts of manu. porarily increased during the period of the Cen- | factured materials, and to discourage mechanical iennial Exhibition in 1876 for the preservation | industry in America. At a meeting of the mer.

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(1877

Third Month,]

MARCH
MOON'S PHASES, Philadelphia.
d. h. m.

d. h. m.
( Last Quarter 6 5 OP.M. First Quarter 22 8 8 A.M.

New Moon... 14 9 53 P.M. Ö Full Moon.... 29 48 A.M.

PHENOMENA.

| Day of the Year. | Day of the Month.

Day of the Week.

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THE SUN, THE MOON,

THE TIDES,
Philadelphia. Philadelphia,

Philadelphia,
Rises Souths Sets Rises. Souths Sets.

High Tide.
Low Tide.

(Apo.,rod. ih, P.M.
A.M.P.M. P.M. P.M.A.M. A.M. A.M. P.M. A.M. | P.M.
h.mn . sh.m. h. m. h. m. h. m. d. A. m.lh. . h. m. h. mn.

(Per., 260, oh, N. 60! 1 Th 6 33 12 28 5 52 8 29 1 24

2 46 3 8 10 5 lộ 175.5 | to.21 A.M. Ở đ 2. 61 2 F 6 31 12 15 5 53 9 42 2 13 7 45 17 329 3 5110 48'11 10 4.37 A.M. Çin Aph. 62 35 6 30 12 2 5 54 10 54 3 2 8 11 18

4 13 4 35 11 32 11 546.5 5.50 A.M. Prises. 63

4 S

6 28 11 49 5 55 A.M. 3 52 8 42 19 4 58 5 21 0 1716.4 10.49 P.M.Vega rises. 64 SM 6 27 11 35 5 57 3 4 431 9 17 20 5 45 6 9 040 I 4

6.3 8.04 P.M. Algenib sets 65 6. Tu 25/11 21 5 58 1 10 5 36 9 58 21 6 35 7 1 1 28

I 53 2.40 A.M. o rises. 66 6 5 59 2 9 6 29 10 47 22 30

8 1 2 20

1.21 A. M. OC. T Scorpii. 67 Th 6 22 10 5 6 I 3 2 7 21 11 42 23

8 331 9

5 3 20 3 525.5 4.13 A.M. O d. 68 F 6 20 10

6 2
3 46 8 12 O 4224

9 38 10

6

4 24 4 57 5.3 2.16 A.M. 24 rises, 69 10 S 6 19 10 206 2 4 22 9 O 1 44 251 10 34 11 1 5 25 5 53 5.4

7.25 P.M. Sirius S. 6 17 10 4

4 52 9 462 46 26 11 26 11 506 20 6 45 5.6 10.17 P.M. EI S. 7112 M 6 16 9 48 6 4 5 17 10 29 348 27 0 12 7 9 7 31 5.8 8.28 P.M. Spica rises. 72 13 Tu 6 14 9 31 6 5 39 11 10

4 50 28
O 31 o 50 7 50

6.0

11.04 P.M. O he. 73 14 W 6 13 14 6 6 6 011 51 5 5129 I 8! 1 251 8 27 8 44 6.1

ecl. in vis 74 15 Th 6 11

8 57 6 7

6 20
0 31

1
1 59 9 0 9 18 6.2

2.29 A.M. o riscs. 6 10 8 40 6 8 6 41 1 13 7 57 2

2 18 2 37 9 37! 9 56 6.4 4:51 AM, Ở . 76 17 S 6 8 8 22 6 9 7 3 1 57 9 3 3 2 56 317 10 15 10 36 6.5

5.45 A.M. rises. 6 7 8 5 6 10 7 29 2 45 10 12 4 3 37 3 58 10 56 11 17 6.5 4.04 A.M. ÓWC. 78 19 M 6 5 7 47 6 11 8 1 3 37 11 23 5 4 21 4 45 11 40

6.5

5.27 A.M. O Oh. 79 20 Tu 6 3 7 29 6 12 8 404 33 A.M. 6

5 II
5 36! o

4 o 30 6.4 5.11 A.M. Spring com. 80 21 W 6 2 7 11 6 13 9 29 5 33 O 34 7

6 3 6 32 0 55 I 22 6.2 10.03 P.M. Regulas & 81 22 Th 6 0 6 52 9 14 10 30 6 35 1 38 8 7 3 7 37 1 51 2 22 5.9 5.01 P.M. O4 0. 82 23 F 5 58 6 34 6 15 11 41 7 36 2 34 9

8.13 8 52 2 56 3 32 5.0 2.31 P.M. S 83.24 S 5 57 6 16 6 16

o 58 8 34

3 20 10 9 29/10 4 II 4 48 5.3 10.32 P.M. Rigel sets & 84 25 S 5 55 5 57

6

17 2 16 9 29 357 11,10 35 11 5 23 5 54 5.4 9.57 P.M. Of. 85 26 M 5 54

3 34 TO 21
4 28 12 11 37

27 6 56 5.7

1.19 A.M. 24 rises. 86 27 Tu 5 52 5 20 19 4 50 II II 4 55 13 4 028

7 23 7 47 5.8 10.47 P.M. 7* set. 87 28 W 5 50 5 16 20 6 3 11 59 5 1914 O 51 1 12 8 9 8 31 6.0

1.44 P.M. VS. (S. 88 29 Th 5 49 4 43 6 21 7 17 A.M. 5 45 15 1 32 153

8 51 9 12 6.2

0.26 P.11. gr.Hel. lat 89 30 F 5 47 4 256 22 8 30

0 48 6

2 15

2 38 9 34 9 57 6.4 11.21 P M. Antares risas. 90311 5 46 4

943

2 59 3 23 10 18 10 42 6.5 4.52 A.M. " rises, MARCH.

A FOOL can ask more questions than a wise

man can answer; but a wise man cannot ask Jupiter 50 north of the Moon Mar, 7: Mars 50

more questions than he will find a fool ready to

8. Venus 1° south

answer.

13. Saturn 20

13. ECLIPSES IN 1877.

Last Monday our contemporary, the Public

Ledger, compleied its fortieth year, and marked IN 1877 there will be five Eclipses, three of the its entrance upon the forty-first by a generous inSun and two of the Moon. Only one of them, crease in its size and the donning of a handsome an Eclipse of the Moon in August, will afford new suit of type. In its new form the Ledger any cntertainment in the United States. The gives more reading matter than any other twoEclipses in order are

Cent newspaper in America.

Not in quantity First: A Total Eclipse of the Moon, Feb. 26 alone does this journal excel; the quality of its and 27, 1877, visible in Western Asia and Eastern matter is of the very best. Edited with rare Europe.

judgment and discretion, every line may be read Second: A Partial Eclipse of the Sun, March aloud in the family circle. While avoiding ver14, 1877, visible in South America south of south biage, the Ledger invariably gives ample accounts Latitude 15°, and from thence over the Ocean to of all public events of importance. Independent near the South Pole.

in the true sense of the word, it is entirely free Third: A Partial Eclipse of the Sun, August from political cliques, “financial rings" and sec. 8, 1877, visible mainly in Central Asia.

tarian bias. It is a paper of the People, a chamFourth: A Total Eclipse of the Moon, August pion of the Right, a scourger of the Wrong, the 23, 1877, partly visible in Philadelphia, early in friend of the Oppressed, and the advocate of the evening of August 23.

Charity, Humanity and True Progress. All Fifth : A Partial Eclipse of the Sun, Septem- good men must rejoice at the prosperity of so ex. ber 6, 1877, visible in Central Asia and around emplary a journal.-Sunday Dispatch, Philadelthe North Pole.

phia, April 2.

9/16

6 6 23

1 391

6 38.17

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chants of Philadelphia in April, 1768, an address was about 11,000 and the capital $250,000,000. setting forth the grievances of the colonies, speci- About 160,000 hands are employed in good times fied as injurious the law against making steel or in these manufactures. erecting steel-furnaces ; against plating, slitting- During the ten years previous to the outbreak mills and tilt-hammers, for the manufacture of of the Revolution ihe commerce of Philadelphia iron; the restraint laid on hatters and the preven. had increased very greatly. In 1773 the number tion of exporting hats also; and the prohibition of of square-rigged vessels employed in the comcarrying of wool or any kind of woolen goods merce of the port was 426, and of sloops and manufactured in an American colony to another schooners 370. The amount of the export tonAmerican colony-an offence which rendered lia- nage was 46,972 tons, The exports amounted to ble the forfeiture of not only the specific article, £720,135 138. 744 d. sterling. They included flour, but the vessel, boat or wagon with horses which bread, wheat and corn, beef, pork and hams, carried the article. Under the irritation caused planks, boards, staves and timber, with many by the Stamp Act, the Americans resolved to re- other things. The greater proportion of these frain from eating mutton, so that the wool product commodities went to Great Britain. At the same should be greater, and they determined to encour. time the estimate of the value of the imports into age the manufacture of American goods. Under Philadelphia from Great Britain alone was £611,this spirit new manufactures were instituted in 200 sterling. Philadelphia. Richard Wistar inade glass lamps, In 1875 the exports from Philadelphia were glass botiles and brass buttons in 1769. Plunkett worth $31,936,727 : the imports, $23,457,334. The Fleeson commenced the manufacture of Ameri- duties received at the custom-house were $8,164,can paper-hangings in the same year. Gousse 518.71. In the foreign trade the vessels employed Bonnin and George Anthony Morris set up a china- were, foreign 604 of 388,751 tons and 501 American factory in Southwark in 1770. Whitehead Hum- of 563.528 tons. The total of arrivals coastwise phries established a steel-furnace in Seventh street was 8238 American vessels and 1126 foreign ; total, between Market and Chestnut streets, and Benja- 9364. The principal importations were from Eng. min Randolph made wooden buttons, which he de- land, Cuba and Belgium. The principal exports clared were better than those of brass. The cul. were to Great Britain, Belgium and Germany. ture of silk was strongly advocated by the Amer. The chief articles exported were breadstuffs, ican Philosophical Society, and efforts were made petroleum, naphtha, benzine, provisions, leaf-tofor the establishment of that manufacture. These bacco, sugar, snuff and cotton in bales. The enterprises were more patriotic than successful, value of bread-stuffs exported in 1875 was $9,322,and several failed after a year or two of trial. In 971. Sailing-vessels only carried on the com1774 glass-works were established at Kensington merce and navigation of the last century. They by John Elliott & Co. William Calvery, in Lox- were small, a ship of over 200 tons being consid. ley's court, made American carpeting which was ered first class. The introduction of the use of asserted to be superior to that imported. Richard steam in navigation has created immense changes Wells erected spermaceli works at Arch and Sixth in the course of commerce. The lines of steamstreets. Robert Hare offered to the consideration ship5---American, International and Red Starof thirsty patriots his American porter, while from Philadelphia to Liverpool and Antwerp, run Edward Ryves, of Pine and Third streets, pro- several vessels, and have contributed much io the posed, as a means of spending spare time, the increase of commerce, particularly in the handling use of his own manufacture of playing-cards. and shipment of grain, to the success of which These enterprises continued with moderate for grain-elevators and storage-buildings have largetunes until the breaking out of the Revolutionary ly assisted. By the elevators at Washington war. During the whole of that contest American avenue and Girard Point nine vessels can be manufactures were chiefly connected with army | loaded at the same time. There are oceansupplies. Cloth, guns, swords, cannon, saltpetre steamship lines to New York, Boston, Charlesand gunpowder were the principal matters of ton, Savannah, New Orleans and Havana, and manufacture in Pennsylvania during seven long various other places on the coast. The coal-trade years of war. During 1875, a year succeeding a brings to the city, by the Reading and North period of distress all over the country, the leading Pennsylvania Railroads and the Schuylkill and manufactures of Philadelphia were estimated by Lehigh Canals, about four millions of tons of Lorin Blodgett, from statistics furnished by prom. coal annually, a large proportion of which is inent manufacturers, to be worth in money $552,- shipped in the coasting-irade. There was not 000,000, upon which the estimated profii, at no an artificial road of any kind in Pennsylvania more than 6 per cent., was over $33,000,000. during the Revolutionary war. The highways The number of distinct manufactures is so great were simply passages cut through fields and as to almost baffle an attempt to describe them, | forests, the road-bed being the natural earth. many of them being small and of articles difficult | Philadelphia is now the terminus of six great to classify. In the aggregate of manufacturing railroads, whilst on the opposite side of the river establishments, the variety of articles made, the the railroads to New York, Long Branch, Cape number of persons employed and the value of May and Atlantic City are entirely Philadelphia materials used, Philadelphia surpasses all other roads. The Pennsylvania Railroad operates and cities in the United States. In 1870, according controls more than 2000 miles of railroads in the to the census, there were 8579 manufacturing United States. The Reading Railroad owns establishments in the city and vicinity, which more than 1400 miles of railroads, and the freight were operated by 2177 steam-engines of 57,304 and passenger transportation of these corporahorse-power, and 59 water-wheels of 2696 horse- tions is immense. power. In 1875 the city boiler-inspector reported In 1776 the College of Philadelphia, with medi3063 steam-boilers in use, being an increase in five cal department, and the Friends' Academy were years of 891, or 33 per cent. At that ratio the our only literary and scientific educational institunumber of manufacturing establishments in 1876 tions. At the present time, in addition to Girard

Fourth Month,]

APRIL.

(1877

MOON'S PHASES, Philadelphia.
d. h. m.

d. A. me.
( Last Quarter 5 11 29 A.M.

» First Quarter 20 2 36 P.M. New Moon... 13

O 49 P.M.

o Full Moon... 27 11 35 A.M.

PHENOMENA.

Day of the Year. | Day of the Month.

Day of the Week.

Height

223 5.8

96 6 F

7 30 5.8

2

9 27;6.3

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16 43

1 19

58

8 14

11

1

THE SUN, THE MOON,

THE TIDES,
Philadelphia, Philadelphia,

Philadelphia.
Rises Souths Sets Rises, Souths' Sets.

High fide.
Low Tide.

(Apo., 7d 7h. A.M. A.M. P.M. P.M.

P.M. A.M. A.M. A.M. P.N. A.M. P.M. him. m.s.h.m. h. m. h. m. h. m. dlh, m.h.m. h. m. h. m.

( Per., 22d.nih. A.M. 91 is

5 44 3 48 6 24 10 52 2 30 7 12 18 3 45 4 9 1 4/11 28 6.5 5.30 A.M. rises. 92 2 M 15 42 3 30 6 25 11 57 3 24 7 51 19 4 33 4 57 11 52

6.4 8.48 P.M. HS. 93 3. Tu 5 41 3 12 6 26 A.M. 4 18 8 38 20 5 22 5 47 o 16 041 6.310.38 P.M. Aldeb. seta 944

W
5 39 2 54 27 O 54 5 12 9 32 21

6 12 6 37

1 6 1 31 6.0 9.51 A.M. O 4 C. 95 5 Th 5 37 2 37 28 I 42 6 4 10 31 22 7 4 7 29 1 56

5.07 A.M, 06. Sagitt 5 36 2 19 29 2 21 6 54 11 32 23

8 o 8 28 2 48 3 19 5.5 o. 38 AM, . 97 7S 5 34 2

2 6 30

2 53 7 41 O 3524 8 59 9 27 3 47 4 18 5.3 2.42 A.M. o risos. 98 8s

5 33 I 45 6 31 3 20 8 24 I 37 25 9 53 10 17 4 46 5 12 5.3 8.52 P.M. Regulas S. 99 9 M 5 31

1 28 6 32

3 43 9
6 2 39 26 10 42 11 5 5 36

5.5 0.24 A.M. 2 rises. 100 10 Tu 5 30 1 12 6 33

4 5 9 47 3 40 27 11 28 11 49 6 24 5.7 1.15 P.M. Óhd. IOI 1 W 5 28

o 56 6 34
4 24 10 28 4 42 28

O It 7 8

2.18 P.M. 8 in . 102 12 Th 5 27 0 46 35 4 45 11 10 5 45 29 O 31 O 50 7 50

8
9
6.0

4.11 A.M. h rises. 103 13 F 5 25 0 6 37 5 7 11 53 651 o

I 9 I 27 8 27 8 40 6.2 4.09 A.M. (. 104 14 S 5 24 10 38 5 32 O 41 8 01 1 1 47 8

9

9.11 A.M. Ó O C. 105 15 S 5 72

39
6 2

1 32 9 13 2 2 30 2 53 9 49 10 12 6.5 1.17 A.M. OWO. 106 16 M

5 20
o 20 6 40 6 40 2 28 10 241 3 3 18 3 43 10 37 11

26.5

4.16 A.M. in Peribel 107 17 Tu 5 19 0 34 41 7 27 3 27 11 31| 4 4 9 4 36 11 28 11 55 6.5 11.33 P.M. Spica S. 108 18 W 517 O 476 42 8 25 4 29 A.M.

4 5 33

o 23 6.3

5.12 A.M.P rises. 109 19 Th 5 16

9 33 5 30 o 30

0 6 29! o 52

6.1 8.- P.M. 4 stat. 110 20 F 5 14 1 136 44 10 47 6 28 I 18

7 28 1 48 217 5.8 0.13 A.M. OC. « Gemin III 21 S 5 13 1 26 6 45 O 4 7 23

I 57 8

8 18 36 2 47 3 20 5.5 11.36 P.M. O HIC. 11222 S 5 12 I 38 6 46 1 18

2 29 9

8

9 40 3 55! 4 27 5.3 2.20 A.M. Orises. 113 23 M 5 10 150

6

47 2 32 9 3 2 56 10 10 8 10 38 6 59 527 5.4 9.36 P.M. Sirius sets. 114 24 Tu 5 9 2 1 6 48

3 449 50 3 21 11 6 11 32 5 57 6 25.5.6 10.21 P.M. OO. 115 25 W 5 2 11 6 49 4 56 10 38 345 12 11 57 6 51 7 16 5.8 10.56 P.M. Pole * N. 116 26 Th5 6 2 22 6 50

6 8 11 27 4 10 13 O 21 0 43 7 40 8 2 5.9 11.46 AM, 8gr.Hel. Lat 117 27 F 5 5 2 31 6 51 7 20 A.M. 4 36 14 5 I 20 8 24 8 45

6.1 6.11 P.M. V 9. N. 118 28 S 5 3 2 41 6 52

o 18 5 8.15 1 48 2 11 9 7 9 30 6.3 3.12 A.M. h rises. 119 29 S 5 2

6
53 9 39

I TI
5 45 16

2 59 9 54 10 18 0.4 11.37 PM, Arcturus S 120 30

M
5 1 2 576 54 10 41 6 6 29 1711 3 23 3 47 10 42 11 66.5 110.58 P.M. 4 rises.
APRIL,

Ab

1 July 11 New Moon,
9

19 Fast of Ab. (DestrucJupiter 50 north of the Moon Apr. 4.

tion of Jerusalem.) Mars 30

5.

11

21 Sabbath. Saturn 30 south

10.
Elul

1 Aug. 10 New Moon.
Venus 5°

13.

2

11 Sabbath. 5638.

1877

Tishri HEBREW CALENDAR FOR 1877.

1 Sept. 8 Rosh Hashana..

10 Fast of Guedaliah. 5637. 1877.

15 Sabbath. Tebeth 21 Jan. 6 Sabbath.

10 17 Yom Kippur.“ Shebat 1 15 New Moon.

15

22 ist Day of Suckoth.* 15 29 Chamisha Assar.

« 28 Hoshaana Rabba. Adar New Moon.

29 Shemini Atzereth." 13 26 Fast of Esther.

Marcheshvan Oct. 8 New Moon. 14

6 13 Sabbath. Nisan i Mar. 15 New Moon.

Kislev

1 Nov.

7

New Moon,
15
29 ist Day of Passover.*

25 Dec. í Sabbath and ist Day 21 Apr. 4 7th Day of Passover.*

of Chanucca,
24

7
Sabbath.

Tebeth

7

New Moon. Iyar 14 Sabbath and New Moon.

10

16 Fast of Tebeth. 18 May i Lag B'Omer.

16

22 Sabbath, Sivan

13 New Moon.
6

18 Shabuoth.
7
19 Sabbath.

GLASS has been substituted for metal in circles Tamuz i June 12 New Moon,

used for measuring angles, with apparent ad17 28 Fast of Tamuz.

vantages, by L. M. Rutherfurd, of New York. • Strictly observed.

8 32

2 49

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College for orphans, there are nearly 500 public Last day for naturalization, January 2o. schools, with 95,552 pupils and 1878 teachers. For county and State officers, on Tuesday, NoThere are four medical colleges and numerous vember 6th To be elected : Auditor-general, academies, seminaries, private schools and other State treasurer, judge of Common Pleas Court institutions of learning. There were two hos- ! No. 3, district attorney, coroner, city commispitals a century ago, the Pennsylvania and the Sioper. Philadelphia, the latter connected with the alms. Last days for extra assessment, 5th and 6th of house for pauper assistance. There are now 19 September. hospitals for the relief of the sick and

3 for Last day for payment of taxes, October 6th. treatment of the insane. There are 15 dispen- Last day for naturalization, October 6th. saries for the supply of medicine and medical attendance to the poor. There are 21 asylums

QUALIFICATIONS OF Electors. for orphans and abandoned children, 19 homes

VOTING ON Age.-Every male citizen between for aged men and women, an asylum for the deaf

the ages of twenty-one and twenty-two years may and dumb, 3 institutions for the relief of the blind, vote without being assessed. He must previously 5 asylums for the reformation of fallen women, a

have resided in the State one year, and in the home for inebriates, 11 industrial aid societies, 13

election district (or division) where he offers to assistance societies, 10 soup societies and many

vote for at least two months before the election. other institutions with charitable objects,

If his name is not on the registry of voters, he In 1776 there were in Philadelphia city and

must make aflıdavit, if a native citizen, as to his county five congregations of the Church of Eng birthplace and residence in the district for two land (Christ's, St. Peter's, St. Paul's, Trinity, in

inonths, and in the State for one year, except in Oxford township, and St. Thomas', at White case he had been a resident and removed thereMarsh). There were three Presbyterian churches, dence will be sufficient. 'If he is not

native born,

from and again returned, when six months' resione Associate Presbyterian and one Scots Presbyterian in the city, and one at Frankford, a Bap; son's minority, he must also produce proof of his

but the son of a citizen naturalized during the tist church at Pennypack, in Philadelphia, and in Montgomery township: 7 German Lutheran father's naturalization, of which the naturalizachurches (Zion, St. Michael's, Germantown, New tion certificate will be the best evidence. Hanover, St. Peter's, at Barren Hill, Frankford A NATURAL Born Citizen over twenty-two and at the Trappe), 7 German Reformed churches years of age must have paid within two years a in the city and county, 1 Moravian and 1 Meth- State or county tax, which shall have been asodist : 3 Swedish Lutheran (Gloria Dei, St. sessed at least two months and paid one month James, Christ's Church, at Upper Merion); 2 before the election. He must have resided in the Roman Catholic. The Society of Friends had State one year, or if, having previously been a three meeting-houses in the city, meeting-houses qualified elector or native-born citizen of the State, in Germantown and at the various townships. he shall have removed therefrom and returned,

At the beginning of 1876 there were in the city then six months immediately preceding the elec534 religious congregations, including Israelites, tion. He must have resided in the election disas follows: Baptist 71, Congregational 2, Evan- trict where he offers to vote at least two months gelical Association 6, Friends (Orthodox) 8 meet- | immediately preceding the election. If his name ing-houses, Friends (Hicksite) 8, Israelites 9 syn- is not upon the registry list, he must produce at agogues, Lutheran, General Council 22, General | least one qualified voter of the district or division Synod 6, German Mission Synod 1, Independ to prove his residence by affidavit, and himself ent 1, Methodists, including African M. E., make affidavit to the facis upon which he claims 104, Moravian 4, New Church or Swedenbor a right to vote, also that he has not moved into gian 3, Presbyterian 78, Presbyterian Reformed the district for the purpose of voting therein. 13, United Presbyterian 11, Protestant Episcopal Proof of payment of taxes must be made by pro93, Reformed Episcopal 5, Reformed 20, Roman ducing the tax receipt, or by affidavit that it has Catholic 43, Unitarian 2, Universalists 4, other | been lost, destroyed or was never received. In all the features which distinguish a great qualifications as to residence in the State and dis

A Naturalized Citizen must have the same metropolis, as connected with religion, morality, charity, benevolence, industry, trade, art, science, born citizen. He must have been naturalized one

trict, assessinent and payment of taxes, as a nativeliterature, education, Philadelphia is behind no

month before the election. If his name is not on city of its size in the world, whilst by its broad the registry list, he must prove his residence by territorial size, peculiarities of building, cheap the testimony of'a citizen of the district or division, and good markets, with abundance of air, light and himself state by affidavit when and where and water, it exceeds in comfort within the reach and by what court he was naturalized, and proof the poorest classes any other city in the world, duce his naturalization certificate for examination. and is justly entitled to the appellation, of late On challenge, he may be also required, even when years most appropriately given to it, of the “City his name is upon the registry list, to produce a of Homes."

naturalization certificate, unless he has been for

five years consecutively a voter in the district. ELECTIONS IN 1877.

QUALIFICATIONS OF ELECTION Officers, In 1877 general elections will be held in the city of Philadelphia as follows:

No person can be an election officer who holds, 1

or within two months has held, any office or apFor city and ward officers, on Tuesday, Feb-pointment under the federal or State governments, ruary 2oth.

To be elected: Mayor, members of or under any city or county, or any municipal councils, assessors, election officers, school di- | board, commission or trust, in any city, except rectors, etc.

justices of peace, aldermen, notaries public and Last day for payment of taxes, January 20, 1877. persons in the military service of the State.

sects 21.

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