The Works of the English Poets: With Prefaces, Biographical and Critical, 20. köide

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Samuel Johnson
C. Bathurst, 1779
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Page 249 - I take imitation of an author, in their sense, to be an endeavour of a later 25 poet to write like one who has written before him, on the same subject ; that is, not to translate his words, or to be confined to his sense, but only to set him as a pattern, and to write, as he supposes that author would have done, had he lived in our age, and in our 3° country.
Page 191 - Drink hearty draughts of ale from plain brown bowls, And snatch the homely rasher from the coals : So you, retiring from much better cheer, For once, may venture to do penance here. And since that plenteous autumn now is past, Whose grapes and peaches have indulged your taste, Take in good part, from our poor poet's board, Such rivelled fruits as winter can afford.
Page 412 - Humpus foon withdrew, Was fafe, as having fuch a one in view At Covent Garden dial, whom he found Sitting with thoughtlefs air and look profound, Who, folitary gaping without care, Seem'd to fay, " Who is 't? wilt go any where ?" Says Humpus, " Sir, my Mafter bade me pray " Your company to dine with him to-day.
Page 9 - I am hard upon any one, it is my reader : but fome worthy gentlemen, as remarkable for their humanity as their extraordinary parts, have taken care to make him amends for it, by prefixing fomething of their own.
Page 120 - Even churches are no sanctuaries now : There, golden idols all your vows receive, She is no goddess that has nought to give.
Page 136 - Here did the tender tale of Picus ceafe, Above belief the wonder, I confefs. Again we fail, but more difafters meet, Foretold by Circe, to our fuffering fleet. Myfelf, unable further woes to bear, Declin'd the voyage, and am refug'd here. -ENEAS ARRIVES IN ITALY. Thus Macareus — Now with a pious aim Had good -ffineas rais'da funeral' flame, In honour of his hoary nurfe's name.
Page 121 - She is no goddess that has nought to give. Oh, may once more the happy age appear, When words were...
Page 287 - Thousands of happy hours you pass'd with me ; No mention made of old Penelope. On adamant our wrongs we all engrave, But write our benefits upon the wave.
Page 143 - Or form the pliant souls of plants so well; Or to the fruit more gen'rous flavours lend, Or teach the trees with nobler loads to bend. The nymph frequented not the...
Page 212 - Tis the dessert that graces all the feast, For an ill end disparages the rest : A thousand things well done, and one forgot, Defaces obligation by that blot. Make your transparent sweet-meats truly nice, With Indian sugar and Arabian spice : And let your various creams encircled be With swelling fruit just ravish'd from the tree.

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