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ARTICLE XIV.1 - Section 1. All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside. No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law, nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.

Section 2. Representatives shall be appointed among the several States according to their respective numbers, counting the whole number of persons in each State, exciuding Indians not taxed. But when the right to vote at any election for the choice of electors for President and Vice-President of the United States, representatives in Congress, the executive or judicial officers of a State, or the members of the Legislature thereof, is denied to any of the male inhabitants of such State, being twenty-one years of age, and citizens of the United States, or in any way abridged, except for participation in rebellion or other crime, the basis of representation therein shall be reduced in the proportion which the number of such male citizens shall bear to the whole number of male citizens twenty-one years of age in such State.

Section 3. No person shall be a senator or representative in Congress, or elector of President or Vice-President, or hold any office, civil or military, under the United States, or under any State, who having previously taken an oath as a member of Congress, or as an officer of the United States, or as a member of any State Legislature, or as an executive or judicial officer of any State, to support the Constitution of the United States, shall have engaged in insurrection or rebellion against the same, or given aid or comfort to the enemies thereof. But Congress may, by a vote of two-thirds of each house, remove such disability.

Section 4. The validity of the public debt of the United States, authorized by law, including debts incurred for payment of pensions and bounties for services in suppressing insurrection or rebellion, shall not be questioned. But neither the United States nor any State shall assume or pay any debt or obligation incurred in aid of insurrection or rebellion against the United States, or any claim for the loss or emancipation of any slave; but all such debts, obligations, and claims shall be held illegal and void.

Section 5. Congress shall have power to enforce, by appropriate legislation, the provisions of this article.

ARTICLE XV.2 — Section 1. The rights of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States, or by any State, on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.

Section 2. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

1 Adopted 1868. The object of sections 1 and 2 was to th freedn (negroes), emancipated during the Civil War, citizens of the United States.

· Adopted 1870. Its object was to give the freedmen (negroes) the right to vote.

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Christiana, near

Wilmington.
Philadelphia.

2

1683

46,000 434,373 5,258,014

3

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6

1620

7,800 378,717 2,238,943

APPENDIX.

7

Pennsylvania. Name given by Charles II.- 1787 English.

Meaning Penn's Woods.
New Jersey. In honor of Sir George Carteret, 1787 Dutch.

governor of the British Island of

Jersey.
Georgia.
In honor of George II.

1788 English.
Connecticut. From the Indian - Long River. 1788 English.
Massachusetts. From the Indian - - The Great 1788 English.

Hills - from the Blue Hills near

Boston.
Maryland. In honor of Queen Henrietta 1788 English.

Maria, wife of Charles I.
South Carolina. In honor of Charles II.; derived 1788 English.

from Carolus, the Latin for

Charles. New Hamp- Named by Sir Ferdinand Gorges, 1788 English. shire.

in remembrance of Hampshire,

England.
Virginia.

In honor of Queen Elizabeth, 1788 English.

the “ Virgin Queen.' New York.

In honor of the Duke of York, 1788 Dutch.

who became James II. North Carolina. In honor of Charles II.; derived 1789 English.

from Carolus, the Latin for Charles.

St. Mary's. 1634 11,124 319,728 1,042,390
Old Charleston? 1670? 34,000 249,073 1,151,149

8

Dover?

9

1627?

9,280

141,899

376,530

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13

Rhode Island,

1636

1,306 69,110

345,506

14

Vermont.

1724

10,212

85,416

332,422

Either from a fancied resem

1790 English.

Providence.
blance of the Island of Rhode
Island to the Isle of Rhodes in
the Mediterranean, or from the
Dutch Rood or Red Island.
From the French-Green Moun-

1791

English. Fort Dummer tains.

(near Brattle

borough).
From the Indian - At the Head 1792 English. Booneville.
of a River; or meaning, according
to other authorities, The Dark and
Bloody Ground.

From the Indian River of the 1796 English.
Big Bend.

From the Indian - Beautiful or *1803 Americans. Marietta.
Beautiful River.

15

Kentucky.

1769

37,680

73,077 ) 1,858,635

16

Tennessee.

1754

45,600

35,791 1,767,518

3,672,316

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1,118,587

About 38 miles
below New
Orleans.
Vincennes.
Natchez.

19
20

Indiana.
Mississippi.

1702
1716

33,809
47,156

2,192,404
1,289,600

21

Illinois.

From the word Indian.

1816 French.
From the Indian - Great and 1817 French.
Long River, or Father of Waters.

From the union of an Indian 1818 French.
and a French word - Tribe of
Men.

From the Indian - A Place of 1819 French.
Rest.

Cahokia.

1682

55,414

3,826,351

22

Alabama.

Near Mobile
Bay.

1702

50,722

1,513,017

* The most recent authorities (see King's "History of Ohio" in The Commonwealth Series, and the article “Ohio" in the Encyclopædia Britannica) give the date of 1803 instead of 1802, the date usually given heretofore.

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23
24

Maine.
Missouri.

1630
1719

35,000
65,350

96,540

661,086
2,679,184

25

Arkansas.

1690? 52,198

1,128,179

26

Michigan.

1680?

56,451

2,093,889

27

Florida.

1565

59,268

391,422

28

Texas.

1685 274,356

2,235,523

APPENDIX.

29

Iowa.

1833? 55,045

1,911,896

The Main Land.

1820 English. Pemaquid. From the Indian - Muddy, or 1821 French, Fort Orleans Muddy River.

(near Jeffer

son City).
From the Indian Kansas (Smoky 1836 French. Little Rock.
Water) and the French Arc, a
bow.

From the Indian - A weir or 1837 French. Mackinaw.
dam of twigs for catching fish.

From the Spanish Pascua Flor- 1845 Spanish. St. Augustine. ida-Flowery Easter, hence Flowery, or Land of Flowers.

Perhaps from an Indian word 1845 French. Lavaca, on the
meaning Friends.

coast.
The French form of an Indian 1846 Americans. Dubuque.
word applied by the Sioux to the
“Gray-snow Tribe," and meaning
the “Drowsy" or the “Sleepy
Ones.
From the Indian - Wild or Rush- 1848 French.

Green Bay.
ing River (applied to the rapids of
the Wisconsin).
From the Spanish - The name 1850 Spanish.

San Diego.
first occurs in a Spanish work of
fiction (1510); it was there given
to an imaginary island abounding
in gold.

From the Indian — Cloudy or 1858 Americans. Fort Snelling.
Whitish Water.

Either from the Indian - River 1859 Americans. Astoria.
of the West, or from the Spanish
- Wild Marjoram, which grows
there in great abundance.

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80,891

1,427,096
23,000 included

762,794
in Va.
112,090

45,761

in 1790

36

Nevada.

1850

37

Nebraska.

1847

75,995

1,058,910

38 Colorado.

1859? 104,500

412,198

39

North Dakota.

1812

From the Spanish Sierra Neo | 1864 Americans. Genoa, at the vada (Snowy mountain ridge),

base of the Snowy.

Sierras.
From the Indian-Water Valley, 1867 Americans. Bellevue (near
or Shallow River.

Omaha).
From the Spanish Red or 1876 Americans. Denver?"
Colored (referring to the color of
the rocks),

From the Indian -- Leagued or 1889 English. Pembina.
Allied (referring to the confedera-
tion or league of the Sioux tribes).

From the Indian See above. 1889 Americans. Yankton?

From the Latin Mons, a moun- 1889 Americans. Helena?
tain, - The Land of Mountains.
In honor of George Washington. 1889 Americans. | Tumwater.

From the Indian - Diadem of 1890 | Americans. Pioneer City ? the Mountains.

From the Indian - Great Plains. 1890 Americans. Cheyenne.

74,312

182,719

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Total population in 1790, 3.929,214,

Total population, including territories, in 1880, 50,189,200; in 1890, 62,622,250.
Six territories: (1) New Mexico, (2) Utah, (3) Arizona, (4) Alaska, (5) Indian Territory, (6) Oklahoma; the District of Columbia.
The ? indicates conflict of authorities or lack of positive information.

NOTE. — Authorities disagree on a number of the dates and place of settlement of states. The areas of states are taken from the
last edition of Lippincott's Gazetteer, page 2267. The total area, according to Lippincott, of the United States, including Alaska
(577,390), Wyoming (97,833), New Mexico (121,201), Utah (843476), Arizona (113,916), Idaho (86,294), Indian Territory, 68,991),
and the District of Columbia (60) is 3,580,242 square miles. 'This area,” says Lippincott, "is to some extent conjectural, and the
figures of different authorities vary somewhat." The latest estimate in Chambers' Encyclopædia (New Edition) makes the total area of
the United States, with Alaska, 3,602,990 square miles; while Professor Whitney in the Encyclopædia Britannica (New Edition)
gives the total area at 3,550,549 square miles.

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