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The French in
the West and
the South
(1669–1718).

The wars of the
English with
the French and
the Indians
(1689–1763).

131. French exploration of the West; the Jesuit mis-

sionaries.
132. Joliet and Marquette on the Mississippi.
133. La Salle's expedition. (The forts; Louisiana.)
134. Mobile and New Orleans; what the English colo

nists held; what the French held.
135. War with the French and Indians; (1) “King Wil-

liam's War.” (Schenectady, Haverhill, Acadia.)
135. (2) “ Queen Anne's War.” (Deerfield, Annapolis,

Nova Scotia.)
136. (3) “King George's War”; Louisburg. (Results.)
137. (4) The French and Indian War.” (Object; the

French forts.)
138. The Ohio Company; Governor Dinwiddie's mes-

senger.
139. Results of Washington's journey.
140. The Albany Convention; Franklin's snake; Brad-

dock.
141. Braddock's defeat; Washington.
142. Acadian exiles; William Pitt. (Louisburg; Fort

Duquesne; the French driven back to Canada.)
143. Fall of Quebec; Pontiac.
144. What the war settled. (France and the West in

1759; treaty of 1763; what America was to be-

come; Spain; the English flag at the end of 1763.)
145. Four results of the wars between the English and

the French.
146. The thirteen colonies in 1763. (“Making roots.")

The population.
147. Language, religion, social rank; cities; trade.
148. Government of the colonies; law. (“Don't tread

on me.") Unity of the people.
149. Farm life. (The houses; the fires; food; the

store; recreation.)
150. City life; the Southern Plantations. (Dress; life

then and life now.)
151. Travel; letters; hospitality; severe laws.
152. Education; books; Edwards; Franklin. (Elec-

tricity.)
153. Summary of the colonial period.

General state of
the country in
1763.

FOURTH PERIOD. — THE REVOLUTION; THE CONSTITUTION. (1763–1789.)
The Revolution. 154. American commerce; the new king. (What he

was and what he did.)
(1. The colonists

155. The king proposes to tax the colonies; object of
resist taxation

tax; protest of the Americans. (Pitt and Burke.)
without repre

156. The Stamp Act.
sentation,

157. Resistance of the Colonies to the Act.

158. Repeal of the Act; the Declaratory Act; the Bos.
1764-1775.)

ton Massacre; the Gaspee.

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(Colonists resist

ta xation - con-
tinued.)

The Revolution.
(2. From the be-
ginning of the
war, 1775, to
the Declaration
of Independence,
1776.)

The Revolution.
(3. The war of
Independence,
from 1776 to
1777.)

159. The new taxes; their object; the “Boston Tea-

Party.”
160. Parliament closes the port of Boston. (General

Gage; Patrick Henry; the first Continental Con-

gress; Massachusetts; the “ Minute Men.")
| 161. Lexington; Concord. (Paul Revere; the siege of

Boston.)
162. Ethan Allen. (Ticonderoga, Crown Point.)
163. Washington made Commander-in-Chief; Bunker

Hill. (Franklin's letter.)
164. Washington takes command; the attack on Canada.
165. Washington enters Boston; Fort Moultrie.
166. The idea of independence; “ Common Sense."
167. The Declaration of Independence. (The Liberty

bell; the King's statue.) The new nation.
168. Summary
169. What the British hoped to do in New York.
170. Washington at New York; Fort Washington; Fort

Lee.
171. The Battle of Long Island.
172. Washington retreats northward. (Fort Washington;

General Lee.)
173. Fort Lee; Washington retreats southward. (Gen-

eral Lee.)
174. Trenton.
175. Robert Morris.
176. Cornwallis outwitted; Princeton; Morristown;

Lafayette. (De Kalb, Steuben.)
177. Burgoyne's Expedition; Bennington. (Stark.)
178. Howe's Expedition; Brandywine; Germantown.

(Valley Forge.)
179. Saratoga; “Stars and Stripes; ” results of victory.
180. Summary
181. The winter at Valley Forge; England's offer in 1778.
182. Monmouth; Lee; Indian massacres; Clark's vic-

tories in the West.
183. The war in the South; Savannah; Wayne's vic-

tory; Paul Jones.
184. Charleston; Marion and Sumter.
185. Our defeat at Camden.
185. Our victory at King's Mountain.
186. Arnold's treason.
186. The terrible winter at Morristown.
187. General Greene; Cowpens; the retreat; Mrs. Steele;

Guilford Court House; Cornwallis.
188. Greene's victories in South Carolina.
189. The crowning victory of the war. (Lafayette; the

French Fleet; the “World's Upside Down”;

Lord North.)
190. Summary of the Revolution.

The Revolution.
(4. The war of
Independence,
from 77 to
1781.)

After the
Revolution
(1782-1787).

191. George III.'s speech; the treaty; John Adams.
192. Condition of the United States. (Congress.)
193. Distress of the country. (Debt, paper money;

quarrels of the states; no freedom of trade.)
194. Shays' rebellion.
195. The Northwest territory. (The ordinance of 1787;

what the states thought of the territory.)

The formation
and adoption of
the Constitu-
tion (1787–
1789).

196. The convention of 1787; the Constitution.
196. Alexander Hamilton. (The “Ship of State.”)
197. What four things were accomplished by the Con-

stitution.
198. Summary. (What John Adams said.)

FIFTH PERIOD. — THE UNION; NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT. (1789–1860.)

I.
Washington's
Administration.
(Two terms,
1789-1797.)

(Washington. See note 3, page 133, and the section on the

Revolution.)
199. Political parties; election and inauguration of

Washington.
200. Washington's Cabinet; how the government ob-

tained money
201. Payment of three great debts. (Hamilton.)
202. The first census; the U.S. Bank; the Mint. (Deci-

mal coinage.)
203

“Citizen ” Genết; Washington's proclamation.
204. Emigration to the West. (Boone.) Marietta,

Cincinnati. (The first Western newspaper.)
205. The Cotton Gin and its four results.
206. The Whiskey rebellion.
207. Jay's treaty; three new states.
208. Summary of Washington's presidency.

II.
John Adams's
Administration.
(One term,
1797-1801.)

(Sketch of John Adams. See note 3, page 199.).
209. Trouble with France; the “X. Y. Z. Papers.” (Pinck-

ney; war; “Hail Columbia.”)
210. The Alien and the Sedition Laws; death of Wash-

ington.
211. Summary of John Adams's presidency.

III.
Jefferson's
Administration.
(Two terms,
1801-1809.)

{ (Jefferson. See note 2, page 201.)

212. Republican simplicity; the new capital.
213. Probable extent of the republic. (Means of travel.)
214. The Pirates of Tripoli; war; results.
215. Purchase of Louisiana; four results.
216. Lewis and Clarke. (Oregon.)
217. The French and English war; the Leopard and the

Chesapeake.
218. The Embargo; the Non-Intercourse Act.

TOPICAL ANALYSIS.

li

(Jefferson's Ad-

ministration -
continued.)

IV.

Madison's
Administration.
(Two terms,
1809-1817.)

219. Aaron Burr.
220. “Fulton's Folly." (Western steamboats; the Sa-

vannah.)
221. Importation of slaves forbidden. (Jefferson and

slavery.)
222. (Summary of Jefferson's presidency.)
(Madison. See note 1, page 210.)
223. Trade re-opened with Great Britain.
224. How Napoleon deceived us.
225. Tecumseh's conspiracy; Tippecanoe.
226. The Henry Letters; cause of the war of 1812.
227. General Hull; Detroit.
228. The Constitution and the Guerrière.
229. Perry's victory. (His dispatch.)
230. General Jackson and the Indians; Tohopeka.

(Result.)
231. Chippewa; Lundy's Lane; burning of Washington.
232. Macdonough's victory; Fort McHenry. (The “Star

Spangled Banner.”)
233. Jackson at New Orleans; end of the war. (The

Hartford Convention, note 1, p. 219); the treaty
234. The three chief results of the war of 1812.
235. Summary of Madison's presidency.
(Monroe. See page 220, and note 1.)
236. The President's inauguration.
237. His journey; the “ Era of Good Feeling.”
238. First Seminole War; purchase of Florida.
239. Question of the western extension of slavery.

(Jefferson.)
240. Change of feeling about slavery; the North and

the South.
241. How slavery divided the country in regard to trade.
242. Why the North opposed the western extension of

slavery; why the South demanded it.
243. The Missouri Compromise.
244, 245. Desire to reach the West; the “National

Road.
246. The Monroe doctrine. (“ America for Ameri-

cans.”).
247. Visit of Lafayette.
248. Summary of Monroe's presidency.

of peace.

V.
Monroe's
Administration.
(Two terms,
1817–1825.)

VI.
John Quincy
Adams's
Administration.
(One term,
1825-1829.)

(John Quincy Adams. See note 1, page 229.)
249–251. The Erie Canal and its results.
252–255. “Steam-wagons”; railroads and their results.
256-257. The temperance cause; results.
258. Summary of J. Q. Adams's presidency.

VII.
Jackson's
Administration.
(Two terms,
1829–1837.)

VIII.
Van Buren's
Administration.
(One term,
1837-1841.)

IX., X.
Harrison and
Tyler's Ad-
ministrations.
(One term,
1841-1845.)

(Jackson. See page 234 and note 2.)
260, 261. Removal of government officers. (Jefferson's

rule.)
262–264. Garrison, Channing; the anti-slavery move-

ment; J. Q. Adams.
265. Jackson and the United States Bank.
266. South Carolina resists the duty on imported goods.
267–269. Calhoun; nullification ; Webster ; Jackson's

course of action; Henry Clay.
270. Growth of the country; railroads; canals; coal;

the express system.
271. Indian wars; the West; Chicago.
272. American art, books, and newspapers.
273. Summary of Jackson's presidency.
(Van Buren. See note 3, page 246.)
274, 275. Business failure and panic. (Causes.)
276. The Independent Treasury and the sub-treasuries.
277, 278. The Mormons; Nauvoo; Utah.
279. Emigration to the United States. (Ocean steam-

ships.)
280. Summary of Van Buren's presidency.
(Harrison and Tyler. See note 3, page 251, and note 4,

page 252.)
281. Election of Harrison; his death; Tyler.
282. The Dorr rebellion; Ashburton treaty; Anti-

renters.
283. The electric telegraph; Doctor Morton's discovery.
284. Annexation of Texas.
285. Summary of Harrison and Tyler's presidencies.
(Polk: See note 4, page 256.)
286–288. The Oregon question; Dr. Whitman; the

treaty.
289-292. The Mexican War; Palo Alto; Resaca de la

Palma; declaration of war; Monterey; Buena
Vista; California; New Mexico; General Scott;
Vera Cruz; Cerro Gordo; the City of Mexico;

results of the war.
293, 294. Discovery of gold in California; Emigration;

results.
295. Summary of Polk's presidency.
fTaylor and Fillmore. See note 2, page 265.)
296. The question of the further extension of slavery.

(The North and the South.)
297. Three methods of settlement proposed; danger of

disunion; the compromise of 1850; the Fugitive

Slave Law.
298. Passage of the Fugitive Slave Law; its results; the

“ Underground Railroad "; the “ Higher Law."
299. “ Uncle Tom's Cabin”; Charles Sumner and Jef-

ferson Davis.
300. Summary of Taylor and Fillmore's presidencies.

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