The Quarterly review, 93. köide

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Murray, 1853
 

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Page 554 - The earth is utterly broken down, the earth is clean dissolved, the earth is moved exceedingly. The earth shall reel to and fro like a drunkard, and shall be removed like a cottage, and the transgression thereof shall be heavy upon it, and it shall fall, and not rise again.
Page 529 - A remarkable circumstance in this case was, that after these experiments he had no distinct recollection of his dreams, but only a confused feeling of oppression or fatigue ; and used to tell his friends that he was sure they had been playing some trick upon him.
Page 476 - Who first invented work, and bound the free And holiday-rejoicing spirit down To the ever-haunting importunity Of business in the green fields, and the town — To plough, loom, anvil, spade — and oh! most sad To that dry drudgery at the — desk's dead wood?
Page 376 - In the multitude of the sorrows that I had in my heart : thy comforts have refreshed my soul.
Page 437 - He that walketh righteously, and speaketh uprightly; he that despiseth the gain of oppressions, that shaketh his hands from holding of bribes, that stoppeth his ears from hearing of blood, and shutteth his eyes from seeing evil; He shall dwell on high: his place of defence shall be the munitions of rocks: bread shall be given him; his waters shall be sure.
Page 351 - Canterbury — and thence entered the metropolitan city, after an absence of six years, amidst the acclamations of the people. The cathedral was hung with silken drapery ; magnificent banquets were prepared ; the churches resounded with organs and hymns ; the palace-hall with trumpets ; and the Archbishop preached in the chapter-house on the text, ' Here we have no abiding city, but we seek one to come.
Page 144 - ... a good deal to be said on the other side of the question — so, do you mind?" " Dear me, ma'am, I'd be sorry she wasn't to get a good husband, I would.
Page 528 - ... asleep in his tent, and evidently much annoyed by the cannonading. They ^then made him believe that he was engaged, when he expressed great fear, and showed an evident disposition to run away. Against this they remonstrated, but at the same time increased his fears by imitating the groans of the wounded and the dying ; and when he asked, as he often did, who was down, they named his particular friends.
Page 457 - In one small but compact band the Bishop of Petra (who is on this occasion the 'bishop of the fire,' the representative of the patriarch) is hurried to the Chapel of the Sepulchre, and the door is closed behind him. The whole church is now one heaving sea of heads, resounding with an uproar which can be compared to nothing less than that of the Guildhall of London at a nomination for the city.
Page 368 - I cannot do other than I have done," he replied ; and turning to Fitzurse, he added, " Eeginald, you have received many favours at my hands ; why do you come into my church armed ? " Fitzurse planted the axe against his breast, and returned for answer, " You shall die ; I will tear out your heart." Another, perhaps in kindness, struck him between the shoulders with the flat of his sword, exclaiming, " Fly ! you are a dead man."

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