The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex, 1. köide

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J. Murray, 1871 - 475 pages
 

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Kasutaja arvustus  - Britt84 - LibraryThing

Very interesting to read, and definitely a very important work of science, though nowadays somewhat outdated... I do very much enjoy and appreciate Darwin's writings. He is very thorough and really ... Read full review

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Kasutaja arvustus  - P_S_Patrick - LibraryThing

This is a difficult book to read in some ways. The main one being that it is so dense, the amount of information, observations, and evidence presented to the reader is staggering, all of it with the ... Read full review

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Page 152 - I probably attributed too much to the action of natural selection or the survival of the fittest. I have altered the fifth edition of the Origin so as to confine my remarks to adaptive changes of structure.
Page 433 - THE STUDENT'S ANCIENT HISTORY OF THE EAST. From the Earliest Times to the Conquests of Alexander the Great, including Egypt, Assyria, Babylonia, Media, Persia, Asia Minor, and Phoenicia.
Page 213 - We may thus ascend to the Lemuridae ; and the interval is not wide from these to the Simiadae. The Simiadee then branched off into two great stems, the New World and Old World monkeys ; and from the latter, at a remote period, Man, the wonder and glory of the Universe, proceeded.
Page 101 - ... and small tribes are united into larger communities, the simplest reason would tell each individual that he ought to extend his social instincts and sympathies to all the members of the same nation, though personally unknown to him. This point being once reached, there is only an artificial barrier to prevent his sympathies extending to the men of all nations and races.
Page 200 - The great break in the organic chain between man and his nearest allies, which cannot be bridged over by any extinct or living species, has often been advanced as a grave objection to the belief that man is descended from some lower form; but this objection will not appear of much weight to those who, from general reasons, believe in the general principle of evolution.
Page 102 - I believe that the experiences of utility organized and consolidated through all past generations of the human race, have been producing corresponding nervous modifications, which, by continued transmission and accumulation, have become in us certain faculties of moral intuition — certain emotions responding to right and wrong conduct, which have no apparent basis in the individual experiences of utility.
Page 104 - Looking to future generations, there is no cause to fear that the social instincts will grow weaker, and we may expect that virtuous habits will grow stronger, becoming perhaps fixed by inheritance. In this case the struggle between our higher and lower impulses will be less severe, and virtue will be triumphant.
Page 179 - All other series of events — as that which resulted in the culture of mind in Greece, and that which resulted in the Empire of Rome — only appear to have purpose and value when viewed in connection with, or rather as subsidiary to, the great stream of Anglo-Saxon emigration to the West.
Page 17 - Without question, the mode of origin and the early stages of the development of man are identical with those of the animals immediately below him in the scale: — without a doubt, in these respects, he is far nearer the Apes, than the Apes are to the Dog.
Page 68 - The same high mental faculties which first led man to believe in unseen spiritual agencies, then in fetishism, polytheism, and ultimately in monotheism, would infallibly lead him, as long as his reasoning powers remained poorly developed, to various strange superstitions and customs.

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