Manchester Health Lectures for the People, 8. köide

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John Heywood, 1885

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Page 16 - ... (c) by the discovery of pretty general concomitancy in the fluctuation of the two conditions, from much phthisis with much wetness of soil to little phthisis with little wetness of soil. But the connection between wet soil and phthisis came out last year in another way, which must here be recalled, (d) by the observation that phthisis had been greatly reduced in towns where the water of the soil had been artificially removed, and that it had not been reduced in other towns where the soil had...
Page 160 - Any house or part of a house so overcrowded as to be dangerous or injurious to the health of the inmates, whether or not members of the same family: 6.
Page 16 - A residence on or near a damp soil, whether that dampness be inherent in the soil itself, or caused by percolation from adjacent ponds, rivers, meadows, marshes or springy soils, is one of the primal causes of consumption in Massachusetts, probably in New England, and possibly in other portions of the globe. Second. Consumption can be checked in its career, and possibly, nay probably, prevented in some instances, by attention to this law.
Page 17 - ... water of the soil had been artificially removed, and that it had not been reduced in other towns where the soil had not been dried. (5) The whole of the foregoing conclusions combine into one — which may now be affirmed generally, and not only of particular districts — that WETNESS OF SOIL IS A CAUSE OF PHTHISIS TO THE POPULATION LIVING UPON IT.
Page 7 - ... matter or impregnated with any animal or vegetable matter, or upon which any such matter may have been deposited, unless and until such matter shall have been properly removed, by excavation or otherwise, from such site.
Page 159 - If a local authority, who have themselves undertaken or contracted for the removal of house refuse from premises, or the cleansing of earthclosets privies ashpits and cesspools, fail, without reasonable excuse...
Page 102 - That palter with us in a double sense ; That keep the word of promise to our ear, And break it to our hope.
Page 162 - With respect to the structure of walls, foundations, roofs and chimneys of new buildings for securing stability and the prevention of fires, and for the purposes of health...
Page 9 - Every person who shall erect a new domestic building shall cause the whole ground surface or site of such building within the external walls to be properly asphalted or covered with a layer of good cement concrete, rammed solid, at least six inches thick, wherever the dampness of the site or the nature of the soil renders such a precaution necessary.
Page 159 - ... authority shall be liable to pay to the occupier of such house a penalty not exceeding five shillings for every day during which such default continues after the expiration of the said period.

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