The History of Progress in Great Britain: commerce, manufactures, religious liberty, civil liberty

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Houlston and Wright, 1860
 

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Page 345 - I came into the House one morning, well clad, and perceived a gentleman speaking, whom I knew not, very ordinarily apparelled ; for it was a plain cloth suit, which seemed to have been made by an ill country tailor ; his linen was plain, and not very clean; and I remember a speck or two of blood upon his little band, which was not much larger than his collar : his hat was without a hatband. His stature was of a good size ; his sword stuck close to his side ; his countenance swollen and reddish; his...
Page 318 - Lay me a green sod under my head, And another at my feet; And lay my bent bow by my side, Which was my music sweet ; And make my grave of gravel and green, Which is most right and meet.
Page 70 - And they sat down to eat bread : and they lifted up their eyes and looked, and, behold, a company of Ishmaelites came from Gilead with their camels bearing spicery and balm and myrrh, going to carry it down to Egypt.
Page 354 - That the pretended power of dispensing with laws, or the execution of laws, by regal authority, as it hath been assumed and exercised of late, is illegal.
Page 354 - That the freedom of speech and debates or proceedings in parliament ought not to be impeached or questioned in any court or place out of parliament.
Page 289 - In such condition there is no place for industry, because the fruit thereof is uncertain, and consequently no culture of the earth; no navigation, nor use of the commodities that may be imported by sea; no commodious building; no instruments of moving and removing such things as require much force; no knowledge of the face of the earth; no account of time; no arts; no letters; no society; and, which is worst of all, continual fear and danger of violent death; and the life of man, solitary, poor,...
Page 354 - That the raising or keeping a standing army within the kingdom in time of peace, unless it be with consent of parliament, is against law.
Page 367 - If the meaning of these words, finding against the direction of the court in matter of law, be, that if the judge, having heard the' evidence given in court, (for he knows no other) shall tell the jury upon this evidence.
Page 262 - If the gallows instead of the counter, and the galleys instead of the fines, were the reward of going to a conventicle to preach or hear, there would not be so many sufferers. The spirit of martyrdom is over; they that will go to church to be chosen sheriffs and mayors, would go to forty churches rather than be hanged. If one severe law were made and punctually executed, that whoever was found at a conventicle should be banished the nation, and the preacher be hanged, we should soon see an end of...
Page 328 - I, because we were so occupied in other matters, that we had no time to examine them how they agreed with the word of God: What, said he, surely you mistook the matter, you will refer yourselves wholly to us therein? No, by the faith I bear to God...

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