Nature, 4. köide

Front Cover
Sir Norman Lockyer
Macmillan Journals Limited, 1871
 

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Page 269 - It is interesting to contemplate an entangled bank, clothed with many plants of many kinds, with birds singing on the bushes, with various insects flitting about, and with worms crawling through the damp earth...
Page 261 - What needs my Shakespeare for his honoured bones, The labour of an age in piled stones, Or that his hallowed relics should be hid Under a star-ypointing pyramid? Dear son of memory, great heir of Fame, What need'st thou such weak witness of thy name? Thou in our wonder and astonishment Hast built thyself a livelong monument.
Page 269 - There is grandeur in this view of life, with its several powers, having been originally breathed by the Creator into a few forms or into one; and that, whilst this planet has gone cycling on according to the fixed law of gravity, from so simple a beginning endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being evolved.
Page 264 - Accurate and minute measurement seems to the non-scientific imagination a less lofty and dignified work than looking for something new. But nearly all the grandest discoveries of science have been but the rewards of accurate measurement -and patient long-continued labour in the minute sifting of numerical results.
Page 265 - I am purposing them, to be considered of and examined, an account of a philosophical discovery which induced me to the making of the said telescope ; and I doubt not but will prove much more grateful than the communication of that instrument ; being in my judgment the oddest, if not the most considerable detection which hath hitherto been made in the operations of nature.
Page 269 - Hence and because we all confidently believe that there are at present, and have been from time immemorial, many worlds of life besides our own, we must regard it as probable in the highest degree that there are countless seed-bearing meteoric stones moving about through space. If at the present instant no life existed upon this earth, one such stone falling upon it might, by what we blindly call natural causes, lead to its becoming covered with vegetation.
Page 29 - If we consider the heavens, the work of his fingers, the moon and the stars which he has ordained...
Page 209 - Report on the Progress and Condition of the Royal Gardens at Kew during the Year 1875, p.
Page 237 - Newton and Raphael — are potential in the fires of the sun. We long to learn something of our origin. If the Evolution hypothesis be correct, even this unsatisfied yearning must have come to us across the ages which separate the primeval mist from the consciousness of to-day.
Page 190 - In the schools provided by the Board the Bible shall be read, and there shall be given such- explanations and such instruction therefrom in the principles of morality and religion as are suited to the capacities of children.

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