The Judicial Dictionary, of Words and Phrases Judicially Interpreted: To which Has Been Added Statutory Definitions, 1. köide

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Sweet and Maxwell, 1903 - 2302 pages

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Page 376 - A valuable consideration in the sense of the law may consist either in some right, interest, profit, or benefit accruing to the one party, or some forbearance, detriment, loss, or responsibility given, suffered, or undertaken by the other.
Page 85 - ... the rent at which the same might reasonably be expected to let from year to year, free of all usual tenants' rates and taxes, and tithe commutation rent-charge, if any, and deducting therefrom the probable average annual cost of the repairs, insurance, and other expenses, if any, necessary to maintain them in a state to command such rent...
Page 2 - ... where one by his words or conduct wilfully causes another to* believe in the existence of a certain state of things, and induces him to act on that belief, so as to alter his own previous position, the former is concluded from averring against the latter a different state of things as existing at the same time.
Page 527 - ... shall be construed to mean a want or failure of issue in the lifetime or at the time of the death of such person, and not an indefinite failure of his issue, unless a contrary intention shall appear by the will, by reason of such person having a prior estate tail, or of a preceding gift, being, without any implication arising from such words, a limitation of an estate tail to such person or issue, or otherwise...
Page 15 - An accommodation party is one who has signed the instrument as maker, drawer, acceptor or indorser, without receiving value therefor, and for the purpose of lending his name to some other person. Such a person is liable on the instrument to a holder for value, notwithstanding such holder at the time of taking the instrument knew him to be only an accommodation party.
Page 462 - Where the instrument is payable at a fixed period after date, after sight, or after the happening of a specified event, the time of payment is determined by excluding the day from which the time is to begin to run, and by including the date of payment.
Page 278 - IT were infinite for the law to judge the causes of causes, and their impulsions one of another : therefore it contenteth itself with the immediate cause ; and judgeth of acts by that, without looking to any further degree.
Page 453 - And said unto them, Sirs. I perceive that this voyage will be with hurt and much damage, not only of the lading and ship, but also of our lives.
Page 519 - An instrument is payable at a determinable future time, within the meaning of this Act, which is expressed to be payable: 1. At a fixed period after date or sight; or 2. On or before a fixed or determinable future time specified therein; or 3. On or at a fixed period after the occurrence of a specified event, which is certain to happen, though the time of happening be uncertain.
Page 61 - Act, 1922, but does not include land occupied together with a house as a park, gardens (other than as aforesaid), pleasure grounds, or land kept or preserved mainly or exclusively for purposes of sport or recreation, or land used as a racecourse...

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