The Hornet's Nest: A Novel of the Revolutionary War

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Simon and Schuster, 11. nov 2003 - 480 pages
The first work of fiction by a President of the United States—a sweeping novel of the American South and the War of Independence.

In his ambitious and deeply rewarding novel, Jimmy Carter brings to life the Revolutionary War as it was fought in the Deep South; it is a saga that will change the way we think about the conflict. He reminds us that much of the fight for independence took place in that region and that it was a struggle of both great and small battles and of terrible brutality, with neighbor turned against neighbor, the Indians’ support sought by both sides, and no quarter asked or given. The Hornet’s Nest follows a cast of characters and their loved ones on both sides of this violent conflict—including some who are based on the author’s ancestors.

At the heart of the story is Ethan Pratt, who in 1766 moves with his wife, Epsey, from Philadelphia to North Carolina and then to Georgia in 1771, in the company of Quakers. On their homesteads in Georgia, Ethan and his wife form a friendship with neighbors Kindred Morris and his wife, Mavis. Through Kindred and his young Indian friend Newota, Ethan learns about the frontier and the Native American tribes who are being continually pressed farther inland by settlers. As the eight-year war develops, Ethan and Kindred find themselves in life-and-death combat with opposing forces.

With its moving love story, vivid action, and the suspense of a war fought with increasing ferocity and stealth, The Hornet’s Nest is historical fiction at its best, in the tradition of such major classics as The Last of the Mohicans.

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LibraryThing Review

Kasutaja arvustus  - ValerieAndBooks - LibraryThing

Picked up this historical fiction by Jimmy Carter because of my interest in the Revolutionary War. Carter focuses on the happenings in the American South, particularly Georgia (not surprisingly, as we ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

Kasutaja arvustus  - fulner - LibraryThing

Carter manages a mass of characters who struggle to survive the revolutionary war. From wives hoping to be reunited with husbands, to Quakes and other pacifists trying to keep peace at all cost, to ... Read full review

Contents

17741777
139
17781785
283
Epilogue
463
Copyright

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Page 190 - Christ also suffered for us, leaving us an example, that ye should follow his steps: who did no sin, neither was guile found in his mouth : who, when he was reviled, reviled not again ; when he suffered he threatened not ; but committed himself to him that judgeth righteously...
Page 190 - For so is the will of God, that with well doing ye may put to silence the ignorance of foolish men : as free, and not using your liberty for a cloak of maliciousness, but as the servants of God.
Page 190 - For this is thank-worthy, if a man for conscience toward God endure grief, suffering wrongfully. 20 For what glory is it, if, when ye be buffeted for your faults, ye shall take it patiently ? but if, when ye do well, and suffer for it, ye take it patiently, this is acceptable with God.
Page 75 - ... you are to be drawn on hurdles to the place of execution, where you are to be hanged by the neck, but not until you are dead...
Page 190 - For he that said, Do not commit adultery, said also, Do not kill. Now if thou commit no adultery, yet if thou kill, thou art become a transgressor of the law. 12 So speak ye, and so do, as they that shall be judged by the law of liberty.
Page 430 - The recollection of your past achievements and the prospect of future laurels should prevent your acting in such a manner for a moment. You have gained a character, and why should you risk the loss of it for the most trifling gratifications? You must know that in your present situation you can neither provide for your safety nor assist me in annoying the enemy. Let me then entreat you by the regard you have for your fame, and by your love to your country, to repair to my camp and subject yourselves...

About the author (2003)

Jimmy Carter was the thirty-ninth President of the United States, serving from 1977 to 1981. In 1982, he and his wife founded The Carter Center, a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the lives of people around the world. Carter was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2002. He is the author of thirty books, including A Full Life: Reflections at Ninety; A Call to Action: Women, Religion, Violence, and Power; An Hour Before Daylight: Memoirs of a Rural Boyhood; and Our Endangered Values: America’s Moral Crisis.

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