Pioneer Scouts of the Ohio

Front Cover
D. Appleton, 1924 - 264 pages
This is a story of the pioneer days in the American West.
 

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Page 252 - Under the authority of the act of congress of 1791, Arthur St. Clair, Governor of the North Western Territory, had been appointed Major General and Commander-in-chief. He 'was empowered to treat with the Indian tribes; to be in fact a military, as well as civil Governor of the Territory. President Washington did his duty faithfully; he appointed all the officers, for the campaign, but the nation was poor and weak, especially in the west. Every exertion was made to raise an army and provide provisions...
Page 256 - American lines, and to the very mouths of the field pieces. They fought with the daring courage of men whose trade is war, and who are stimulated by all those passions which can impel the savage mind to vigorous exertions. Under circumstances thus arduous, raw troops may be expected to exhibit that inequality which is found in human nature. While some of the American soldiers performed their duty with the utmost resolution, others...
Page 68 - ... sixteen feet in size on the inside, and about four and a half feet to five feet deep. It is very plain, and rests on the backs of twelve stone oxen or cows, which stand immersed to their knees in the earth. It has two flights of steps, with iron...
Page 263 - The Indian war now assumed a serious aspect, and the reputation of the nation required to be retrieved from the disgrace it had sustained. The whole western frontier, lay exposed to fresh inroads of the enemy, now flushed with so dreadful a victory. General Washington wished to have congress give him authority to raise three additional regiments of foot, and a squadron of horse, for three years, unless peace should be sooner made with the Indians. A bill containing these provisions, was introduced...
Page 262 - This woman ran ahead of the whole army, in their flight from the field of battle. Her large quantity of long red hair, floated in the breeze, which the soldiers followed through the woods, as their avant courier that moved rapidly onward, to the place of their ultimate destination.
Page 264 - ... period of time. The measures of General Washington they said, had always been conciliatory, towards the savages. It was shown, that Harmar offered to treat with the savages in the villages of the Maumee river, but the Indians, at first, refused to treat, and then, asked for thirty days, to consider, on the subject, which was granted; This was in the summer of 1790, and at the end of the thirty days, the savages refused to give any answer, to the proposals to treat. In that same thirty days, however,...
Page 256 - Indians were there also; this was owing to a want of riflemen to pre^s the advantage, which Darke had obtained by driving off the enemy. Instantly after this charge, General Butler was mortally wounded, the right wing was broken, the artillerists were nearly all killed, the guns were taken by the enemy, and the camp was everywhere penetrated by his ferocious warriors. Major Butler, though his leg was broken by a ball, mounted his horse, and bravely Id his battalion to the charge.
Page 263 - Kiver the boundary, and, by treating with the Indians, a peace might be restored to this frontier. Such were some of the reasons assigned by the opposition to General Washington, in Congress. They strove with all their might to defeat the bill, for the defense of the North West Territory.
Page 260 - The second line was commmanded by Gaither, Bedinger and Darke. Of the first line, all the officers were either killed or wounded, except three, and of the artillerists, all were killed except four privates ! Of the regulars, the following officers were killed, viz: General...
Page 252 - CAMPAIGN AND DEFEAT. Under the authority of the act of congress of 1791, Arthur St. Clair, Governor of the North Western Territory, had been appointed Major General and Commander-in-chief. He was empowered to treat with the Indian tribes; to be in fact a military, as well as civil Governor of the Territory. President Washington did his...

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