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GARDINER. I wonder his body was never found after the battle.

BU T LE R. Tound! why, you fool, is not his body here about the houfe, doft thou think he can beat his drum without hands and arms?

COACH M A N. 'Tis master as sure as I stand here alive, and I verily believe I saw him last hight in the town-close.

GARDINER. Ay! how did he appear?

COACH MA N. Like a white horse.

BU T L E R. Pho, Robin, I tell you he has never appear'd yet but in the shape of the sound of a drum.

COACH M A N. This makes one almoft afraid of one's own shadow. As I was walking from the stable t’other night without any lanthorn, I fell across a beam, that lay in my way, and faith my heart was in my mouth-I thought I had ftumbled over a spirit.

BUTLER. Thou might'st as well have stumbled over a straw; why, a spirit is such a little little thing, that I have heard a man, who was a great scholar, say, that he'll dance a Lancasbire horn-pipe upon the point of a needle “As I sat in the pantry last night counting my fpoons, the candle methought burnt blue, and the spay'd bitch jook'd as if she saw something.

COACH M A N. Ay, poor cur, fhe's almoft frighten'd out of her wits.

GARDINER. Ay, I warrant ye, she hears him many a time and often when we don't.'

BU T

BUT LE R. My Lady must have him laid, that's certain, what ever it cost her.

GARDINER. I fancy, when one goes to market, one might hear of somebody that can make a spell.

COACH M A N.
Why may not the parson of our parish lay him?

BU T L E R.
No, no, no, our parfon cannot lay him.

COACH M A N.
Why not he as well as another man?

BU T L E R. Why, .ye fool, he is not qualified he has not taken the oaths.

GARDINER. Why, d'ye think, Jobn, that the spirit would take the law of him?-faith, I could tell you one way to drive him off.

COACH MAN. How's that?

GARDINER. I'll tell you immediately (drinks ]

_fancy Mts, Abigal might scold him out of the house.

COACH MA N. Ay, fhe has a 'tongue that would drown his drum, if any thing could.

BU T L E R. Pugh, this is all froth! you understand nothing of the 'matter--the next time it inakes a noise, I tell you what ought to be done, I would have the steward speak Latin to it.

COACH M A N. Ay, that would do, if the steward had but courage.

GARDINER. There you have it-He's a fearful man. If I had as much learning as he, and I met the ghost, I'll tell him his own! but alack ! what can one of us poor men do with a spirit, that can neither write nor read ?

much

BU TL ER. Thou art always cracking and boasting, Peter; thou doft not know what mischief it might do thee, if such a filly dog as thee should offer to speak to it. For aught I know, he might flea thee alive, and make parchment of thy skin to cover his drum with.

GARDINER. A fiddlestic! tell not me I fear nothing; not I! I Never did harm in my life, I never committed murder.

BUTLER. I verily believe thee, keep thy temper, Peter ; after fupper we'll drink each of us a double mug, and then let coine what will.

GARDINER. Why, that's well said, John, an honest man that is pot quite sober, has nothing to fear Here's to ye why now if he should come this minute, here would I kand. Ha! what noise is that?

BUTLER and COACH MA N.
Ha! where?

GARDINER.
The devil! the devil! Oh no, 'tis Mrs. Abigal.

BU T L E R.
Ay faith! 'tis fhe; 'tis Mrs. Abigal! a good mistake!
Pris Mrs. Abigal.

Enter ARIGA L.

ABIGAL Here are your drunken fots for you! Is this a time to be guzzling when gentry are come to the house! why don't you lay your cloth? How come you out of the Itables? Why are not you at work in your garden?

GAR

GARDIN E R. Why, yonder's the fine Londoner and Madam fetching a walk together, and methought they look'd as if they should say they had rather have my room than my company.

BUTLER And so forsooth being all three met together, we are doing our endeavours to drink this same Drummer out of our heads.

GARDINER. For you must know, Mrs.·Abigal, we are all of opinion that one can't be a match for him, unless one be as drunk as a drum.

COACH M A N. I am resolved to give Madam warning to hire herself another coachman; for I came to serve

my

master d'ye see, while he was alive, but do suppose that he has no further occasion for a coach, now he walks.

BUT LE R. Truly, Mrs. Abigal, I must needs say, that this fame {pirit is a very odd fort of a body, after all, to fright Madam and his old servants at this rate.

GARDINER. And truly, Mrs. Abigal, I must needs say, I served my master contentedly, while he was living: but I will serve no man living, (that is, no man that is not living) without double wages.

A B I G A L. Ay, 'tis such cowards as you that go about with idle stories to disgrace the house, and bring so many ftrangers about it; you first frighten yourselves, and then your neighbours.

GARDIN E R.
Frighten'd! I scorn your word. Frightend quoth-a !

AB I G A L.
What, you fot! are you grown pot-valiant ?

GAR

GARDINER. Frighten'd with a drum! that's a good one! it will do us no harm, I'll answer for it. It will bring no bloodshed along with it, take my word. It sounds as like a train-band drum as ever I heard in

my

life.
BU T L E R.
Prythee, Peter, don't be so presumptuous.

A BI GA L.
Well, these drunken rogues take it as I could wish.

[Afide.
GARDIN E R.
I scorn to be frightened, now I am in fort; if old
Dub-a-dub should come into the room I would take him

BU T L E R. Prythee hold thy tongue:

GARDIN E R. I would take him - [The drum beats, the Gardiner

endeavours to get off and falls. BU TLE R. and COACH M A N. Speak to it, Mrs. Abigal.

GARDIN E R.
Spare my life, and take all I have.

COACH M A N.
Make off, make off, good Butler, and let us go

hide ourselves in the cellar.

[They run of

AB IGAL Sola.

ABIGA L. So, now the coast is clear, I may venture to call out my

Drummer. -But fift let me shut the door, left we be surpriz’d. Mr. Fantome, Mr. Fantome! (He beats. ] Nay, ray, pray, come out, the en, my's fled--I must speak with you immediately don't stay to beat a parley.

[The buck scene opens and discovers Fantome with a drum.

FAN

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