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De a curiofity.

so that it must turn to your advantage one way or another.

L A D Y. I think you argue very rightly. But where is the man? I would fain see him. He inust be a curiosity.

V E L L U M. I have already discours'd him, and he is to be with me, in my office, half an hour hence. He asks nothing for his pains, till he has done his work ;-no cure, no money.

LADY
That circumstance, I must confess, would make one
believe there is more in his art than one would imagine.
Pray, Vellun, go and fetch him hither immediately.

V E L L U M.
I am gone. He shall be forth-coming forthwith.

[Exeunt.

Enter B UTE' E R, COACHMAN,

G A R D IN ER,

and

BU T L E R.
Rare news, my lads, rare news !

G A R D I NE R.
What's the matter ; haft thou got any more vales for

us.

BU T L E R.
No, 'tis better than that.

COACH MA N.
Is there another stranger come to the house !

BUTLER
Ay, such a ftranger as will make all our lives easy.

GARDIN E R.
What! is he a Lord.?

BU T L E R.
A Lord! no, nothing like it, ---He's a Conjurer.

COA CH

COACHMAN A Conjurer! what, is he come a wooing to my Lady?

BUTLER No, no, you fool, he's come on purpose to lay the spirit.

COACH M A N.
Ay marry, that's good news indeed ; but where is he?

BU T L ER He's lock'd up with the Steward in his office, they are laying their heads together very close. I fancy they are catting a figure.

GARDINER:
Pr'ythee, John, what sort of a creature is a Conjurer?

BU T L E R. Why he's made much as other men are, if it was not for his long gray

beard.

COACH M A N. Look ye, Peter, it stands with reason, that a Conjurer Mould have a long gray beard--for did ye ever know a witch that was not an old woman?

GARDIN E R. Why! I remember a conjurer once at a fair, that to my thinking was a very smock'd face man, and yet spew'd out fiity yards of green ferret. I fancy, John, if thoud'ft

get him into the pantry and give him a cup of ale, he'd shew us a few tricks. Doft chink we could not persuade him to swallow one of thy case-knives for his diversion! he'll certainly bring it up again:

BU T L E R. Peter, thou art such a wiseacrel thou dost not know the difference between a Conjurer and a Jugler. This man must be a very great master of his trade. His beard is at least half a yard long, he's drest in a strange dark cloke, as black as a coal. Your Conjurer always goes in mourning.

G A R

GARDINER.
Is he a gentleman? had he'a fword by his fide ?

BU T L E R. No, no, he's too grave a man for that, a conjurer is as grave as a judge-but he had a long white wand in his hand.

COACHMAN. You may be fure there's a good deal of virtue in that wand—I fancy 'tis made out of witch-elm.

GARDINER. I warrant you if the ghoft appears, he'll whisk ye that wand before his eyes, and strike you the drumstic out of his hand.

BU T L E R. No ; the wand, look ye, is to make a circle, and if he once gets the ghost in a circle, then he has him let him get out again if he can. A circle, you must know, is a conjurer's trap.

COACH MA N.
But what will he do with himn when he has him there?

BUT LE R.
Why then he'll overpower him with his learning.

GARDINER. If he can once compass him, and get him in lob's pound, he'll make nothing of him, but speak a few hard words to him, and perhaps bind him over to his good behaviour for a thousand years.

COACH M A N. Ay, ay, he'll send him packing to his grave again with a flea in his ear, I'warrant him.

BU TLE R. No, no, I would advise Madam to spare no cost. If the conjurer be but well paid, he'll take pains upon the ghost, and lay him, look ye, in the red-sea---and then he's laid for ever.

VOL. II.

COACH

COACH M A N.
Ay, marry, that would spoil his drum for him.

GARDINE R.
Why John, there must be a power of spirits in that
Same red-lea- warrant ye they are as plenty as fish.

COACH M A N. Well, I wish after all that he may not be too hard for the conjurer ; I'm afraid he'll find a tough bit of work on top

GARDIN E R. I wish the spirit may not carry a corner of the house off with him.

BU T L E R. As for that, Peter, you may be sure that the steward has made his bargain with the cunning-man beforehand, that he shall stand to all costs and damages but harkt yonder's Mrs. Abigal, we shall have her with us immediately, if we do not get off.

GARDINER. Ay lads ! if we could get Mrs. Abigal well laid too we should lead merry lives.

.

For to a man like me that's stout and bold,
A ghost is not so dreadful as a scold.

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ACT

ACT III.

SCENE 1,

SCENE opens, and discovers Sir George in

Vellum's Office.

I

Wonder I don't hear of Vellum yet. But I know

his wisdom will do nothing rashly. The fellow has been so used to form in business, that it has infected his whole conversation. But I must not find fault with that punctual and exact behaviour, which has been of so much use to me ; my estate is the better for it.

Enter V E L L UM.

Well, Vellum, I am impatient to hear your success.

V E L L U M. First, let me lock the door.

Sir GEORGE. Will your Lady admit me?

V E L L U M. If this lock is not mended soon, it will be quite spoiled.

Sir GEORG E. Pr’ythee let the lock alone at present, and answer me

V E L L U M. Delays in business are dangerous. I must send for the smith next week--and in the mean tiine will take a minute of it.

Sir

GEORGE. What says your Lady?

V EL

La

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