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ACT: V.

SCENE I.

Enter Sir George in his Conjurer's Habit, the

Butler marching before him with two large Can

dles, and the two Servants coming after him, one bringing a little Table, and another a Chair.

BUTLER.
N'T please your worship, Mr. Conjurer, the ftew-

ard has given all of us orders to do whatever you shall bid us, and pay you the same respect, as if you were our master.

Sir GEORGE. Thou say't well.

GARDIN E R. An't please your conjurer's worship, shall I set the table down here ?

Sir GEORGE.
Here, Peter

G A R D IN E R.
Peter ! he knows my name by his learning,

(Afidel COACH MA N. I have brought you, reverend Sir, the largest elbow. chair in the house ; 'tis that the steward fits in when he holds a court.

Sir GEORGE.
Place it there.

BUTLER :
Şir, will you please to want any thing else?

Sir

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Sir GEORGE.
Paper, and a pen and ink.

BUTLER. Sir; 'I believe we have paper that is fit for your purpose! my Lady's mourning paper, that is blacked at the edges--would you choofe to write with a crow-quill?

Sir GEORG E. There is none better.

BUT LE R. Coachman, go fetch the paper and itandish ont of the little parlour.

COACHMAN. [to the Gardiner.] Peter, prythee do thou go along with me, I'm afraid --you know I went with you laft night into the garden, when the Cook-maid wanted a handful of parfley.

BUTLER. Why, you don't think I'll stay, with the Conjurer by myself!

GARDIN ER. Come, we'll all three go and fetch the pen and ink together.

[Exeunt servants. Sir GEORGE, Solus. There's nothing, I fee, makes such Atrong alliances as fear. These fellows are all entered into a confederacy against the ghost. There must be abundance of business done in the family at this rate. But here comes the triple alliance. Who could have thought these three rogues could have found each of 'em an employment in fetching a pen and ink? Enter Gardiner with a sheet of paper, Coachman

with a Standish,' and Butler with a Pen.

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GARDIN E R. Sir, there is your paper.

COACH.

got rid on't.

COACHMAN. Sir, there is your standish.

BU T L ER. Sir, there is your crow-quill pen - I'm glad I have

[Afide. GARDINER. He forgets that he's to make a circle [Afide.) Doctor, shall I help you to a bit of chalk

Sir GEORG E. It is no matter.

BUTLER. Look ye, Sir, I fhowed you the spot where he's heard ofteneft, if your worship can but ferret him out of that old wall in that next room.

Sir GEORGE We shall try.

GARDIN E R. That's right, John. His worship must let fly all his learning at that old wall.

BUTLER. Sir, if I was worthy to advise you, I would have a bottle of good O&tober by me. Shall I set a cup of old ftingo at your elbow?

Sir GEORG E. I thank thee we shall do without it.

GARDINER. Jobn, he seems a very good-natured man for a con jurer. .

BUT LE R. I'll take this opportunity of enquiring after a bit of plate I have loft. I fancy, whilst he is in my Lady's pay, one may hedge in a question or two into the bar. gain. Sir, Sir, may I beg a word in your ear?

Sir GEORGE.
What wouldst thou ?

B'U T. BUTLER Sir, I know I need not tell you, that I loft one of my hlver spoons last week.

Sir GEORG E. Marked with a swan's neck

BU T L E R. My Lady's crest! He knows every thing. [Afde.] How would your worship advise me to recover it again?

Sir GEORGE Hum!

BUTLER.
What mult I do to come at it?

Sir GEORGE.
Drink nothing but small-beer for a fortnight-

BUTLER.
Small-beer! Rot-gut!

Sir GEORG E. If thou drink ft a single drop of ale before fifteen days are expired-it is as much as thy spoon-is worth.

BU T L E R.
I fhall never recover it that way; I'll e'en buy a new

( Afide.
C A H M A N.
D'ye mind how they whisper?

G A R DINER. I'll be hang'd if he be not asking him something about Nell,

COACHMAN. I'll take this opportunity of putting a question to hira about

poor Dobbin: I fancy he could give me better counsel than the farrier.

BUTLER. [to the Gardiner.) A prodigious man! he knows every thing: Now is the time to find thy pick-ax.

GARDIN E R. I have nothing to give him: Does 'not he expect to have his hand crossed with filver ?

COACH

one.

2

COACHMAN. [to Sir George. }
Sir, may a man venture to ask you a question ?

Sir GEORG E.
Alk it.

COACH M A N.
I have a poor horfe in the stable that's bewitched

Sir GEORG E.
A bay gelding.

COACHMAN.
How could he know that?

(Afide. Sir GEORG E. Bought at Banbury.

C.O A CHM A N. Whew-so it was o' my conscience. (Whiples.

Sir GEORGE Six years

old last Lammas.

..COACH M A N. To a day. (Afde.) Now, Sir, I would know whether the poor beast is bewitched by goody Crouch or goody Flye?

Sir GEORG E. Neither.

COACHMAN. Then it must be goody Gurton? for she is the next old woman in the parish.

GAR DI NE R. Haft thou done, Rabin?

COA CHM A N. (lo tbe Gardiner.) He can tell thee any thing.

GARDINER. (to Sir George.) Sir I would beg to take you a little further out of hearing

Sir GEORGE. Speak.

GARDINE R. The butler and I, Mr. Doctor, were both of us in love at the fame time with a certain person.

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