Prince Albert's golden precepts: or, The opinions and maxims of ... the prince consort, selected from his addresses, etc

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Sampson Low & Company, 1862 - 133 pages
 

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Page 46 - ... we are living at a period of most wonderful transition, which tends rapidly to accomplish that great end, to which, indeed, all history points— the realization of the unity of mankind. Not a unity which breaks down the limits and levels the peculiar characteristics of the different nations of the earth, but rather a unity, the result and product of those very national varieties and antagonistic qualities.
Page 2 - ... person ; but it is more peculiarly the duty of those who, under the blessing of Divine Providence, enjoy station, wealth, and education.
Page 45 - I conceive it to be the duty of every educated person closely to watch and study the time in which he lives; and, as far as in him lies, to add his humble mite of individual exertion to further the accomplishment of what he believes Providence to have ordained.
Page 46 - ... placed within the reach of everybody ; thought is communicated with the rapidity, and even by the power, of lightning.
Page 46 - Nobody, however, who has paid any attention to the peculiar features of our present era, will doubt for a moment that we are living at a period of most wonderful transition, which tends rapidly to accomplish that great end to which, indeed, all history points — the realization of the unity of mankind.
Page 3 - Let them be careful, however, to avoid any dictatorial interference with labour and employment, which frightens away capital, destroys that freedom of thought and independence of action which must remain to every one if he is to work out his own happiness, and impairs that confidence under which alone engagements for mutual benefit are possible.
Page 58 - The Exhibition of 1851 is to give us a true test and a living picture of the point of development at which the whole of mankind has arrived in this great task, and a new starting point from which all nations will be able to direct their further exertions.
Page 96 - Please to recollect that this species of bore is a most useful animal, well adapted for the ends for which Nature intended him. He alone, by constantly returning to the charge, and repeating the same truths and the same requests, succeeds in awakening attention to the cause which he advocates, and obtains that hearing which is granted him at last for self-protection, as the minor evil compared to his importunity, but which is requisite to make his cause understood.
Page 107 - ... all, can only embrace a comparatively short space of time, and a small number of experiments. From none of these causes can we hope for much progress ; for the mind, however ingenious, has no materials to work with, and remains in presence of phenomena, the causes of which are hidden from it. But...
Page 12 - The products of all quarters of the globe are placed at our disposal, and we have only to choose which is the best and the cheapest for our purposes, and the powers of production are intrusted to the stimulus of competition and capital.

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