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DYSPEPSY FORESTALLED AND RESISTED:

OR

LECTURES

ON

DIET, REGIMEN, AND EMPLOYMENT;

DELIVERED TO THE STUDENTS OF AMHERST COLLEGE,

SPRING TERM, 1830.

BY EDWARD HITCHCOCK,
Professor of Chemistry, and Natural History in that Institution.

Whatever will cure, will prevent; as water poured on will extinguish

fire, so it will prevent its being kindled.-CHEYNE.

SECOND EDITION.

CORRECTED AND ENLARGED BY THE ADDITION OF AN

ADDRESS

DELIVERED BEFORE THE MECHANICAL ASSOCIATION IN ANDOVER THEO

LOGICAL INSTITUTION, SEPT. 21, 1830;

AND

AN APPENDIX OF NOTES.

AMHERST:
PRINTED AND PUBLISHED BY J. S. & C. ADAMS.

NORTHAMPTON :

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NEW-YORK, J. LEAVITT, J. P. HAVEN, G. &c. & H. CARVILL.-BOSTON, R. LORD AND HOLBROOK, PEIRCE AND PARKER.

1

DISTRICT OF MASSACHUSETTS.... To wit :

District Clerk's Ofice. Be it remembered, that on the eighth day of May, A. D. 1830, in the fifty fourth year of the independence of the United States of America, J. S. and C. Adams, of the said district, bare deposited in this office the title of a Book, the right whereof they claim as Proprietors in the words following, to wit :

Dyspepsy forestalled and resisted: or Lectures on Diet, Regimen and Employment; delivered to the Students of Amherst College ; Spring Term, 1830. By Edward Hitchcock, Professor of Chemistry and Natural History in Amherst College. Whatever will cure, will prevent; as water poured on will extinguish fire, so it will prevent its being kindled.—Cheyne.

In conformity to the act of Congress of the United States, entitled “an act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the times therein mentioned;" and also to an act entitled “an act supplementary to an act,entitled an act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts and books to the authors and proprietors of such copies during the times therein mentioned; and extending the benefits thereof to the arts of designing, and etching historical and other prints."

JNO. W. DAVIS, Clerk of the District of Massachusetts.

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PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION.

Most of the additions to this edition of the following Lectures, consist of An Address on the Physical Culture adapted to the Times, delivered at Andover last autumn: and an Appendix of Notes. The latter contain fuller discussions of some points but partially examined in the Lectures, and also a view of several subjects connected with Hygiene, not treated of at all in the first edition. The whole work has also been divided into numerous sections, with short captions prefixed to each subdivision, indicating its contents, so as to render practicable a rapid examination of the work. To aid in the same object, the subjects treated of are stated briefly, as far as possible, over each right hand page; and a copious summary of the contents of the whole work, will be found in the usual place for a Table of Contents. Short notes have also been occasionally put in the margin of the body of the work, besides those in the Appendix. In only a few cases, however, have new thoughts been inserted in the original text: But the broad end of the Etvioo has been often used, in erasing from thence, what further reflection showed to be erroneous or injudicious.

The author acknowledges his obligations to the Editors of those periodicals and newspapers, who have inserted Reviews, or Notices, of the first edition of these Lectures. This acknowledgement extends, at least, to the following works; and perhaps to others, which may have noticed the Lectures without his knowledge.

American Journal of Education : Quarterly Register of the American Education Society: American Journal of Science and Arts : Spirit of the Pilgrims : Christian Examiner: Journal of Health : Journal of Humanity : Christian Mirror : Southern Religious Telegraph : Village Record ; and Newburyport Herald.

The author, also, is indebted to those very respectable gentlemen in the metropolis of New England, who have generously borne their public testimony in favor of the Fourth Lecture, as it appeared in the form of a Prize Essay.

Whatever suggested amendments of the work are contained in these numerous notices, have been thankfully received ; and either made in the proper place, or the reasons for a different opinion have been given in the Notes.

In preparing thiswork-particularly the second edition-the following works have been more or less thoroughly consulted; and extracts from them all will be found in this edition. The list is here inserted, in the hope that it may assist the intelligent dyspeptic, in the selection of his library.

Journal of Health, 1st and 20 Vols. J. Johnson on Derangements of the Liver and Internal Organs, 1 Vol. 8vo.

Do. Essay on Morbid Sensibility of the Stomach and Bowels,&c. 1 Vol. 12mo.

Do. Influence of Civic Life, Sedentary Habits and Intellectual Refinement on Human Health, &c. 1 Vol. 8vo.

iv

Philip on Indigestion, &c. 1 Vol. 8vo.
Paris on Diet, 1 vol. 8vo.
Cheyne's Natural Method of Curing the Discases of the Body and the
Disorders of the Mind, 1 Vol. 8vo.

Do. Essay on Health and Long Life, 1 Vol. 8vo.
Do. Essay on Diet and Regimen, 1 Vol. 8vo.
Trotter's view of the Nervous Temperament, 1 Vol. 12mo.
Do. Essay on Intemperance, 1 Vol. 8vo.

Sure Methods of Improving Health, and Prolonging Life, &c. 1 Vol. 8vo.

The Manual for Invalids, 1 Vol. 8vo.
The Dyspeptic's Monitor, 1 Vol. 12mo.
Daggett's Abridgement of the writings of Cornaro, 1 Vol. 18mo.
Faust's Catechism of Health, 1 Vol. 12mo.
Rees' Cyclopedia.
Edinburgh Encyclopedia.
Encyclopedia Americana.
Beddoes' Essays on Hygeia, 2 Vols. 12mo.

Lambe's Additional Reports on the Effect of a Peculiar Regimen in Cases, &c. 1 Vol. 8vo.

Reid's Essays on Hypochondriacal and other Nervous Affections, 1 Vol. 8vo.

Sinclair's Code of Health and Longevity, 4 Vols. 8vo. Hufeland's Art of Prolonging Life, 2 Vols. 8vo. Noveaux Elemens D'Hygiene, Par Charles Londe, 2 Vols. 8vo. Paris 1827.

Le Catechisme De La Medicine Physiologique, 1 Vol. 8vo. Paris 1824.

La Physiologie Des Gens Du Monde Par le Chev, Chaponnier, 1 Vol. 8vo. Paris 1829.

Hygiene Des Colleges et Des Maisons D'Education; Par Ch. Pavet De'Courtelle; Paris, 1827.

ΥΓΙΕΙΝ Α. ΠΑΡΑΓΓΕΛΜΑΤΑ ΠΡΟΣ ΧΡΗΣΙΝ ΤΟΥ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΟΥ ΛΑΟΥ; παρα ΚΩΝΣΤΑΝΤΙΝΟΥ ΚΑΡΑΘΕΟΔΩΡΗ, Paris, 1829.

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As the following Lectures were prepared and delivered without solicitation, so they are published upon the private responsibility of the writer ; who has not waited to ascertain what reception they would meet from his hearers. If any explanation is needed for thus printing them, so as to be offered for sale the very day after the last one was delivered, he would say to his auditors, who have given him so full and patient a hearing, that he hopes a desire to accomplish the most in the cause of temperance, has been his leading motive. He thought that the delivery of these Lectures would be likely to produce more effect than their perusal alone. Yet he supposed that no memory would be sufficiently retentive to preserve a distinct recollection, even of all the important rules and maxims, connected with the subject. He wished, therefore, to give all who are disposed, an opportuuity to examine, at their leisure, the system of diet, regimen and employment, which he has advanced; by putting this volume within their reach. And he thought it important, that this should be accomplished, while the interest excited on the sub

ject, was yet fresh. Circumstances of a private and personal nature, conspired also, to urge on this publication thus rapidly. The writer is aware, that such a course has rendered attention to literary niceties more difficult than would be desirable. For the whole business of writing, delivering, and printing these Lectures, has been crowded into the space of a few months; and this too, in addition to ordinary professional duties in College. He hopes, however, that though the style may need correction, the meaning will be found clear and definite--a point that has been kept steadily in view.

The author presumes that these considerations will afford little, or no apology, for errors, in the view of the professed critic. To such, and to all others, into whose hands this volume may fall, he would say, in the words of a distinguished dietetic writer of early times, in his preface to an Essay on Health and Long Life: -"I know not what may be the fate and success of this performance ; nor am I solicitous about it, being conscious the design was honest, the subject weighty, and the execution the best my time, my abilities, and my health would permit, which cannot bear the labor of much filing and finishing. Being careful not to encroach on the province of the physician, I have concealed nothing, my knowledge could suggest, to direct the sufferer, in the best manner I could, to preserve his health, and lengthen out his life : and I have held out no false lights to lead him astray, or torment him unnecessarily."

The reader will perceive, that the fourth Lecture is the same, with a few sliglit additions, as a Prize Essay recently published under the direction of the American Temperance Society. Let him not hence infer, that that Society are acquainted with the sentiments advanced in the other Lectures, and approve of them. For this is not the case : no member of that Society having been consulted, as to any of the opinions advanced. The writer is alone responsible for those opinions; and to him alone belongs the credit, if they are correct, or on him must fall the blame, if they are erroneous.

Amherst College, May 6th, 1830.

Since the above was in type, the following communication has been received from the students of Amherst College. And while I take this pportunity to thank them for their favorable reception of the following Lectures, I am happy in being able thus early to comply with their request. To Prof. E. HITCHCOCK,

S12,—The members of the College, through the medium of the undersigned as their Committee, acknowledge their obligations to you for your interesting and instructive Lectures on the subject of Health. By giving them a permanent form, your wishes for the welfare of the students, it is believed, will be best accomplished, and at the same time, important information be placed within the reach of others.

We are instructed, therefore, to request, in the name of the students, that the discourses in question may be printed.

H. B. HACKETT.
PETER PARKER.

LYMAN GIBBONS.
Amherst College, May 7th, 1830.

H. D. HUMPHREY.

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