A Handbook of Hygiene and Sanitary Science, 274. number

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J. & A. Churchill, 1877 - 490 pages
 

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Page 420 - Any fireplace or furnace which does not as far as practicable consume the smoke arising from the combustible used therein, and which is used for working engines by steam, or in any mill factory dyehouse brewery bakehouse or gaswork, or in any manufacturing or trade process whatsoever; and 8. Any chimney (not being the chimney of a private dwelling-house) sending forth black smoke in such quantity as to be a nuisance...
Page 422 - ... exposed for sale, or deposited in any place for the purpose of sale, or of preparation for sale, and intended for the food of man...
Page 417 - Any house or part of a house so overcrowded as to be dangerous or injurious to the health of the inmates, whether or not members of the same family: 6.
Page 461 - Gives, lends, sells, transmits, or exposes, without previous disinfection, any bedding, clothing, rags, or other things which have been exposed to infection from any such disorder, shall be liable to a penalty not exceeding five pounds...
Page 340 - The whole of the foregoing conclusions combine into one — which may now be affirmed generally, and not only of particular districts — that WETNESS OF SOIL IS A CAUSE OF PHTHISIS TO THE POPULATION LIVING UPON IT.
Page 391 - Acts, so far as such proceedings relate to conditions dangerous or injurious to health, and also an account of the supervision exercised by him, or on his advice, for sanitary purposes over places and houses that the sanitary authority...
Page 416 - For the purposes of this act, 1. any premises in such a state as to be a nuisance or injurious to health; 2.
Page 390 - ... diseased or unsound or unwholesome or unfit for the food of man...
Page 390 - ... inspect and examine any animal, carcase, meat, poultry, game, flesh, fish, fruit, vegetables, corn, bread, flour, or milk...
Page 441 - ... are enabled to taint the food, water, or air, which people consume. Thus, when a case of cholera is imported into any place, the disease is not likely to spread, unless in proportion as it finds, locally open to it, certain facilities for spreading by indirect infection.

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