Life

Front Cover
Macmillan & Company, 1868
A cat accused of taking a piece of cheese sets off a chain of events that involves the whole town.
 

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Contents

Dialogue between the Court and Keymis and the Tower Rack
423
His renewed Interpellation of the Phillips
429
Cobhams intended Purchases ib Pophams Address in passing
435
FARCE AFTER TRAGEDY A COURT BESPEAK ENACTED ON THE SCAFFOLD
440
Execution of Watson and Clerke 440 Markhams Behaviour on
449
Unworthiness of Raleghs own Scene in the Presence Chamber
455
Sir William Waads Reward 457 History of his Dorsetshire Manors
465
Cecils Friendship to Ralegh after Lady Ralegh at Sherborne Castle
472
Sherborne adjudged to the King 474 The Curse of St Osmund
477
Duration of the Imprisonment 482 led to Raleghs Discourses
495
Departure from London of the The Discourse of the Invention
504
Visit of the Countess of Beau Raleghs Cordial Elixir
511
CHAPTER XXIII
516
Design and Plan of the History of Valour of Macedonians
533
History Sacred and Profane 526 Why did the History of the World
541
Raleghs Return to the Connec And of the Assays of Ores in
550
CHAPTER XXIV
556
The offered Service to the King Visits to the new Lions of Lon
564
New Plans for Guiana 500 Imbuiaador of the Dute
575
CHAPTER XIV
586
Ralegh and Secretary Winwood 556 Plymouth with De Buisseaux
597
Survey of Rulegls Fleet for The Chae near Cape St Vincent
604
Desertion of Captain John Bailey The Spanish Attack on the
621
Raleghs Visit to Gomera and their Sons Death
628
The Storm in Brava Roads his Report to Ralegh
639
His Instructions and Departure in London
646
CHAPTER XXVI
652
Contents
653
The Departure from Plymouth ib Clerc
665
And about a new Project of Escape 663 Excitement in Paris on that
672
Yelvertons Accusations of Ra Discharge of Wison on receipt
688
Wilsons Correspondence with James in compliance with
707
Reception of the News of Ra The Spanish Match and
710
English Populace and the English Jacobite Views of Raleghs Cha
720

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Page 130 - Queen ; At whose approach the soul of Petrarch wept, And from thenceforth those graces were not seen, For they this Queen attended ; in whose stead Oblivion laid him down on Laura's hearse. Hereat the hardest stones were seen to bleed, And groans of buried ghosts the heavens did pierce : Where Homer's spright did tremble all for grief, And cursed the access of that celestial thief.
Page 129 - Methought I saw the grave where Laura lay, Within that temple where the vestal flame Was wont to burn ; and passing by that way, To see...
Page 147 - Here die I, Richard Grenville, with a joyful and quiet mind: for that I have ended my life as a true soldier ought to do, fighting for his country, queen, religion, and honour: my soul willingly departing from this body, leaving behind the lasting fame of having behaved as every valiant soldier is in his duty bound to do.
Page 188 - I never saw a more beautiful country, nor more lively prospects, hills so raised here and there over the valleys, the river winding into divers branches, the plains adjoining without bush or stubble, all fair green grass, the ground of hard sand easy to march on, either for horse or foot, the deer crossing in every path, the birds towards the evening singing on every tree with a thousand several tunes...
Page 144 - I, that was wont to behold her riding like Alexander, hunting like Diana, walking like Venus, the gentle wind blowing her fair hair about her pure cheeks, like a nymph, sometimes sitting in the shade like a goddess, sometimes singing like an angel, sometimes playing like Orpheus ; behold the sorrow of this world! once amiss hath bereaved me of all.
Page 273 - And therefore I think the best course is to set it at liberty, and leave every man free, which is the desire of a true Englishman.
Page 160 - Of him, that first was raisde for vertuous parts, And now broad spreading like an aged tree, Lets none shoot up, that nigh him planted bee : O let the man, of whom the Muse is scorned, Nor alive, nor dead be of the Muse adorned.
Page 116 - The Spaniards had an army aboard them, and he had none ; they had more ships than he had, and of higher building and charging ; so that, had he entangled himself with those great and powerful vessels, he liad greatly endangered this kingdom of England.
Page 125 - I know not right: Whom when I asked from what place he came And how he hight, himself he did yclepe The Shepherd of the Ocean by name And said he came far from the main-sea deep.
Page 53 - I do not determine, but true it is, he had gotten the queen's ear in a trice, and she began to be taken with his elocution, and loved to hear his reasons to her demands, and the truth is, she took him for a kind of oracle, which nettled them all...