Lady of the Lake

Front Cover
Ginn, Heath, & Company, 1885 - 219 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

I
v
II
xv
III
xli
IV
1
V
3
VI
37
VII
74
VIII
108
IX
142
X
178

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 16 - In all her length far winding lay, With promontory, creek, and bay, And islands that, empurpled bright. Floated amid the livelier light, And mountains that like giants stand To sentinel enchanted land. High on the south, huge Benvenue Down to the lake in masses threw Crags, knolls, and mounds, confusedly hurled, The fragments of an earlier world...
Page 30 - Soldier, rest ! thy warfare o'er, Sleep the sleep that knows not breaking ; Dream of battled fields no more, Days of danger, nights of waking. In our isle's enchanted hall, Hands unseen thy couch are strewing, Fairy strains of music fall, Every sense in slumber dewing. Soldier, rest ! thy warfare o'er, Dream of fighting fields no more : Sleep the sleep that knows not breaking, Morn of toil, nor night of waking.
Page 156 - Now, truce, farewell! and ruth begone! — Yet think not that by thee alone, Proud Chief! can courtesy be shown; Though not from copse, or heath, or cairn, Start at my whistle clansmen stern, Of this small horn one feeble blast Would fearful odds against thee cast. But fear not, doubt not, which thou wilt — We try this quarrel hilt to hilt.
Page 11 - Vanished game ; But, stumbling in the rugged dell, The gallant horse exhausted fell. The impatient rider strove in vain To rouse him with the spur and rein, For the good steed, his labors o'er, Stretched his stiff limbs, to rise no more...
Page 209 - Yet, once again, farewell, thou Minstrel Harp ! Yet, once again, forgive my feeble sway, And little reck I of the censure sharp May idly cavil at an idle lay. Much have I owed thy strains on life's long way, Through secret woes the world has never known, When on the weary night dawned wearier day, And bitterer was the grief devoured alone. — • That I o'erlive such woes, Enchantress ! is thine own.
Page 151 - It seemed as if their mother Earth Had swallowed up her warlike birth. The wind's last breath had tossed in air, Pennon, and plaid, and plumage fair, — The next but swept a lone hill-side, Where heath and fern were waving wide ; The sun's last glance was glinted back, From spear and glaive, from targe and jack, — The next, all unreflected, shone On bracken green, and cold grey stone.
Page 150 - Instant, through copse and heath, arose Bonnets and spears and bended bows; On right, on left, above, below, Sprung up at once the lurking foe; From shingles...
Page 139 - I depart from honour's laws ; To assail a wearied man were shame. And stranger is a holy name; Guidance and rest, and food and fire. In vain he never must require. Then rest thee here till dawn of day ; Myself will guide thee on the way, O'er stock and stone, through watch and ward, Till past Clan-Alpine's outmost guard, As far as Coilantogle's ford ; From thence thy warrant is thy sword.
Page 55 - Moored in the rifted rock, Proof to the tempest's shock, Firmer he roots him the ruder it blow ; Menteith and Breadalbane then Echo his praise agen, " Roderigh Vich Alpine dhu, ho ! ieroe...
Page 55 - And Bannochar's groans to our slogan replied; Glen Luss and Ross-dhu, they are smoking in ruin, And the best of Loch Lomond lie dead on her side.

Bibliographic information