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" The following proposition seems to me in a high degree probable — namely, that any animal whatever, endowed with well-marked social instincts, the parental and filial affections being here included, would inevitably acquire a moral sense or conscience,... "
The Living Age ... - Page 87
1871
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The Edinburgh Review: Or Critical Journal, 134. köide

1871
...natural history : — ' The following proposition seems to me in a high degree probable — namely, that any animal whatever, endowed with well-marked social...developed, or nearly as well developed, as in man. For, firstly, the social instincts lead an animal to take pleasure in the society of its fellows, to...
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The Intellectual repository for the New Church. (July/Sept. 1817 ...

New Church gen. confer - 1871
...fellows, as well as enabling him to think concerning these instincts. Hence Mr. Darwin says :— " Any animal whatever, endowed with well-marked social...developed, or nearly as well developed, as in man." The argument is peculiar: — "As soon as the mental faculties had become highly developed, images...
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The Wesleyan-Methodist Magazine

1871
...all." Mr. Darwin thinks that " any animal whatever, endowed with well-marked social instincts, wonld inevitably acquire a moral sense or conscience as...developed, or nearly as well developed, as in man." * In enunciating this dictum our author pretty well contradicts himself; for he says, that such a creature...
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The Quarterly Review, 131. köide

1871
...speaking of the adherents to his own views, when we do not remember, for example, a word of praise bestowed upon Prof. Owen in the numerous quotations...the intellect of a man would perceive the qualities men's intellect is capable of perceiving, and, amongst them — moral worth. Mr. Darwin, in a passage...
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The General Baptist repository, and Missionary observer [afterw.] The ...

1877
...endowed with well-marked social instincts, the parental and filial affections being here included, would inevitably acquire a moral sense or conscience,...soon as its intellectual powers had become as well, or nearly as well, developed, as in man." Now before we can discuss that proposition itself, we must...
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The Eclectic Magazine of Foreign Literature, Science, and Art, 14. köide

1871
...race. '' The following proposition," he says, " seems to me in a high degree probable — namely, that any animal whatever, endowed with well-marked social...developed, or nearly as well developed, as in man." For, firstly, the social instincts lead an animal to take pleasure in the society of its fellows, to...
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The Contemporary Review, 43. köide

1883
...past generations have undergone. And the late Mr. Darwin thought it probable in a high degree that any animal whatever, endowed with well-marked social...as well developed, or nearly as well developed, as man's. DAMON. I have the greatest respect for all facts, and consider that we owe much, both to Mr....
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The London Quarterly Review, 130–131. köide

1871
...speaking of the adherents to his own views, when we do not remember, for example, a word of praise bestowed upon Prof. Owen in the numerous quotations...the intellect of a man would perceive the qualities men's intellect is capable of perceiving, and, amongst them — moral worth. Mr. Darwin in a passage...
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The Quarterly Review, 131. köide

1871
...speaking of the adherents to his own views, when we do not remember, for example, a word of praise bestowed upon Prof. Owen in the numerous quotations...the intellect of a man would perceive the qualities men's intellect is capable of perceiving, and, amongst them — moral worth. Mr. Darwin, in a passage...
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MacMillan's Magazine, 24. köide

Sir George Grove, David Masson, John Morley, Mowbray Morris - 1871
...race. " The following proposition," he says, "seems to me in a high degree probable — namely, that any animal whatever, endowed with well-marked social...developed, or nearly as well developed, as in man." For, firstly, the social instincts lead an animal to take pleasure in the society of its fellows, to...
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