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My soul is up in arms, ready to charge And bear amidst the foe, with conquering troops. - Congreve. The Mourning Bride (Osmyn),

Act III., Sc. II.

My soul's in arms and eager for the fray. Colley Cibber. Richard III., altered by. (Rich

ard), Act V., Sc. III.

As cold waters to a thirsty soul,
So is good news from a far country.

- Proverbs., Ch. XXV.

Though absent, present in desires they be ; Our soul much further than our eyes can see. -M. Drayton. The Baron's Wars, Bk. III.,

XX.

In the soul
Are many lesser faculties, that serve
Reason as chief; among these Fancy next

Her office holds.
-Milton. Paradise Lost, Bk. V., line 100.

Charms strike the sight, but merit wins the soul. -Pope. The Rape of the Lock, Can. V., line 33.

(For) when the power of imparting joy
Is equal to the will, the human soul
Requires no other heaven.

-Shelley. Queen Mab, II.

Every subject's duty is the king's ; but every subject's soul is his own. -Shakspere. Henry V. (King Henry),

Act IV., Sc. I,

Time Works miracles. In one hour many thousands Of grains of sand run out; and quick as they, Thought follows thought within the human soul.

- Coleridge. The Death of Wallenstein.

Star to star vibrates light; may soul to soul Strike thro' a finer element of her own ?

-Tennyson. Aylmer's Field.

The pure soul Shall mount on native wings, disdaining little

sport, And cut a path into the heaven of glory, Leaving a track of light for men to wonder at.

-Blake. King Edward the Third.

Life makes the soul dependent on the dust ;
Death gives her wings to mount above the

spheres.
--Young. Night Thoughts, Night III.,

line 458.

Hands of invisible spirits touch the strings
Of that mysterious instrument, the soul,
And play the prelude of our fate.
—Longfellow. The Spanish Student,

Act I., Sc. I.

Man is his own star, and the soul that can

Be honest is the only perfect man. -Fletcher. Upon an Honest Man's Fortune.

I count myself in nothing else so happy,
As in a soul remembering my good friends.
-Shakspere. King Richard II. (Boling-

broke), Act II., Sc. III.

There's a strange secret sweet self-sacrifice
In any desecration of one's soul
To a worthy end.
--R. Browning Mr. Sludge, the Medium.

What is the elevation of the soul ? A prompt, delicate, certain feeling for all that is beautiful, all that is grand ; a quick resolution to do the greatest good by the smalles means ; a great benevolence joined to a great strength and great humility.

-Lavater.

Far from mankind, my weary soul, retire,
Still follow truth, contentment still desire.
Who climbs on high, at best his weakness shows,
Who rolls in riches, all to fortune owes.
Read well thyself, and mark thy early ways,
Vain is the muse, and envy waits on praise.

- Chaucer.

The body,--that is dust; the soul,-it is a bud of eternity.

- Nathaniel Culverwell,

Where are Shakspere's imagination, Bacon's learning, Galileo's dream? Where is the sweet fancy of Sidney, the airy spirit of Fletcher, and Milton's thought severe? Methinks such things should not die and dissipate, when a hair can live for centuries, and a brick of Egypt will last three thousand years, I am content to believe that the mind of man survives, somehow or other,

his clay.

-Barry Cornwall.

17

SLEEP.

God gave to earth no greater boon than sleep ;

Pain's panacea, sorrow's healing balm.
O'er slumber, angels fair their vigils keep,
And bring to weary hearts God's infinite calm.

-J. C.H.

He giveth His beloved sleep.

- Bible.

Sweet pillows, sweetest bed ; a chamber deaf to noise, and blind to light; a rosy garland, and

a weary head.

Sir P. Sidney.

To sleep,—there is a drowsy mellifluence in the very word that would almost serve to interpret its meaning,—to shut up the senses and hoodwink the soul; to dismiss the world ; to escape from one's self; to be in ignorance of our own existence; to stagnate upon the earth, just breathing out the hours, not living them, -"doing no mischief, only dreaming of it”; neither merry nor melancholy, something between both, and better than either. Best friend of frail humanity, and, like all other friends, it is best estimated in its loss.

-Longfellow.

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