Manual of Geology: Treating of the Principles of the Science with Special Reference to American Geological History, for the Use of Colleges, Academies, and Schools of Science

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American book Company, 1894 - 1088 pages
 

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Page 11 - Mechanics, printed in our printing-offices, would serve for the universe. The universe, if open throughout to our explorations, would vastly expand our knowledge, and science might have a more beautiful superstructure, but its basement-laws would be the same. The earth, therefore, although but an atom in immensity, is immensity itself in its revelations of truth : and science, though gathered from one small sphere, is the deciphered law of all spheres. It is well to have the mind deeply imbued with...
Page 219 - I ascertained, in 1829, some facts which throw light on the rate at which the sea gains upon the land. It was computed, when the present inn was built, in 1805, that it would require seventy years for the sea to reach the spot : the mean loss of land being calculated, from previous observations, to be somewhat less than one yard annually.
Page 1036 - WILL, while we have no knowledge of any other primary cause of force, it does not seem an improbable conclusion that all force may be will-force ; and thus, that the whole universe is not merely dependent on, but actually is, the WILL of higher intelligences or of one Supreme Intelligence.
Page 1007 - The encasing in ice of huge elephants, and the perfect preservation of the flesh, shows that the cold finally became suddenly extreme, as of a single winter's night, and knew no relenting afterwards...
Page 457 - ... standing not far below the water's surface, if not above it. Hence, in the very inception of the continent, not only was its general topography foreshadowed, but its main mountain chains appear to have been begun, and its great intermediate basins to have been defined — the basin of New England and New Brunswick on the east; that between the Appalachians and the Rocky Mountains over the great interior; that of Hudson's Bay between the arms of the northern V. The evolution of the grand...
Page 1026 - ... away, it must be admitted that the balance of causes which would result in the sun radiating heat just fast enough to preserve the earth in its present state has probably not existed more than 10,000,000 years.
Page 713 - ... of coal. Sporangia and spores are common enough in American coals but they are an inconsiderable part of the whole. Dana,54 reasoning from chemical analyses, objected to Dawson's suggestion that coal was derived largely from bark or material of that nature. Though nearer coal in composition than is true wood, bark resists alteration longer and is less easily converted into coal. The occurrence of stumps and stems outside of the coal beds, " while proof that the interior wood of the plants was...
Page 463 - ... a young geologist, and for many years worked with admirable devotion to his chief, and carried his banner through Scotland, and Germany, and across the Alps, with the same spirit as he had shown when bearing the colours for Wellington at Vimiera. Important communications on Arran and the north of Scotland, including Caithness (1828) and the Moray Firth, others on Gosau and the eastern Alps (1829-1831), and still later, in 1837, a great memoir on the Palaeozoic Strata of Devonshire and Cornwall,...
Page 533 - Thg line of the axis presents now no conspicuous topographical feature; but the direction of the draining streams, which follow the strike of the strata on either side, indicates that it once formed a watershed that gave the initial bearing to their flow. The part of the arch about Cincinnati has been more deeply and extensively removed than farther north, though higher now than elsewhere, and, therefore, •• this probably was originally the highest part of the arch within the limits of the state...
Page 607 - The water flows into the well on top of the gas, until the pressure of the confined gas becomes greater than the weight of the superincumbent water, when an explosion takes place, and a column of water and gas is thrown to a great height.

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